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1996 



The United Methodist Church 
General Conference 



Daily Christian Advocate 
Advance Edition I 



f 

Daily Christian Advocate 
Advance Edition I 

THE GENERAL CONFERENCE OF THE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 
Volume 1 Nashville, Tennessee 



To: General Conference delegates and members of the church 
From: The Commission on General Conference 

This Advance Edition of the Daily Christian Advocate contains reports from general agencies and 
study committees along with legislative proposals from the agencies and annual conferences. This 
volume is sent to all delegates, first lay and clergy reserves, and subscribers. Delegates and first 
reserves must bring this Advance Edition with them to General Conference. Additional free copies 
will not be disfributed. 

The GCFA quadrennial report will be in the material given to delegates in Denver. This information 
should be bound with these reports. 

A second edition containing all proposals from local churches, individuals, and UM groups will be 
mailed to subscribers on the opening day of conference. Delegates will find copies of this volume at 
their desks upon arrival in Denver. 

During General Conference, delegates and first reserves will be issued free copies of the DCA "Daily 
Reports." If other reserve delegates are seated, they may use the material provided by the person they 
replace, or they may purchase copies at the DCA booth. 

All issues of the DCA are issued by authority of the Commission on General Conference. 
Grace and peace, 



^u^^ ^. ^*-^^?U— ctH^iy 



John J. Thomas, chair 
Commission on General Conference 



DCA Advance Edition 



Table of Contents 



Delegate Information 

Agenda Page 3 

Important information Page 4 

Bishops Page 5 

Commission on General Conference Page 5 

Local Committee Page 6 

Judicial Comicil Page 6 

Seating assignments Page? 

Maps Page 10 

Alphabetical list of delegates Page 15 

Delegates and reserves by conference Page 32 

Legislative Committees Page 72 

Nominations to the Committee on Episcopacy . . . Page 80 

Legislative process Page 82 

Abbreviations and codes Page 83 

Parliamentary procedures Page 86 

Plan of Organization and Rules of Order 

Report of the Committee Page 87 

Plan of Organization Page 88 

Rules of Order Page 100 

Report Number Two Page 106 

Church and Society Legislative Committee 

Report of the Board of Church and Society Page 107 

Proposed changes in Discipline Page 117 

Proposed resolutions Page 130 

Conferences Legislative Committee 

Report on Global Nature of UMC Page 168 

Proposed changes in Discipline Page 175 

Proposed resolutions Page 203 

Discipleship Legislative Committee 

Report of the General Board of Discipleship .... Page 207 

Report of the Baptism Study Committee Page 227 

Proposed changes in Discipline Page 236 

Proposed Resolutions Page 259 

Financial Administration Legislative Committee 

Reports of the Council on Finance and Admin. . . . Page 267 

Reports of the General Board of Pensions Page 337 

Reports of the General Board of Publication .... Page 345 

Proposed changes in Discipline Page 356 

Proposed resolutions Page 384 



General/Judicial Administration 

Reports of the General Council on Ministries . . . Page 533 

Report of Site Selection Task Force Page 683 

Proposed changes in Z)isci>/iMe Page 691 

Proposed resolutions Page 711 

Global Ministries Legislative Committee 

Report of the General Board of Global Minstries . Page 719 

Report of the Committee on Hispanic Ministries . Page 735 

Report of Asian-American Language „ 

Ministry Study ..... Page 739 

Report of National Comm. 

onDevelopmgDeafMimstry Page 742 

Report of Interagency Task Force on AIDS .... Page 744 

Proposed changes in Dtsc!/)/iMe Page 749 

Proposed resolutions Page 762 

Higher Education and Chaplaincy Committee 

ReportoftheBoardof Higher Ed. And Min. . . . Page 813 

Proposed changes in Z)ist*/)/i«e Page 821 

Proposed resolutions Page 825 

Independent Commissions Legislative Committee 

Report of the Com. on Archives and History . . . Page 828 

Report of die Com. On Christian Unity Page 830 

Report of the Com. on Pan Methodist Coop. . . . Page 837 

Report of the Commission on Religion and Race . Page 839 

Racism in Rural Areas Task Force Page 849 

Membership in UMC and in Supremacist Groups Page 868 

Report of the Com. on Status and Role of Women Page 871 

Report of United Methodist Communications . . Page 882 

Proposed changes in Dtsd/)/««e Page 901 

Proposed resolutions Page 915 

Local Church Legislative Committee 

Proposed changes in Z)ts«>/«ne Page 941 

Ministry Legislative Committee 

Report of the Committee to Study Ministry .... Page 969 
Ministry Study proposed changes in Discipline . Page 982 

Ministry Study proposed resolutions Page 1026 

Proposed changes in Discipline Page 1039 

Proposed resolutions Page 1098 

Central Conference Commission 

Proposed resolutions Page 1106 

Quadrennial Report of the General Council 
on Finance and Administration 

(Under separate cover) Page 1113 



DCA Advance Edition 



General Conference Agenda and Program 

Following is the overall program of the General Conference. 

The Committee on Agenda plans each day's business schedule beginning Wednesday, April 17. 

All plenary sessions, legislative committees, and offices will be in the Colorado Convention Center, 700 14th Street, Denver, Colorado. 



Registration 

Monday, April 15 2 p.m. - 4 p.m. 

Tuesday, AprW 16 8 a.m. - 8 p.m. 

Wednesday, April 17 8 a.m. - noon 

Monday, A^ril 15 

7:00 p.m. Reception for Bishops 

Tuesday, April 16 
1:30 p.m. Holy Communion and Memorial Service 

2:45 p.m. Organization of General Conference 

Roll Call 

Report of the Committee on Plan 
of Organization and Rules of Order 

Nominations 

Report of Committee on Agenda 
4:30 p.m. Organization of legislative committees 

6:00 p.m. Training of legislative committee officers 
7:45 p.m. Hymn sing 
8: 15 p.m. Episcopal Address 

9:15 p.m.. Meeting of legislative committee officers 

Wednesday, AprH 17 
8: 15 a.m. Choral Music 
8:30 a.m. Worship 
9:00 a.m. Address of the Laity 



10:00 a.m. Report on Study of the Ministry 
Thursday, ./^ril 18 

9:00 a.m. Call to Witness and Prayer in celebration 

of The United Methodist Church's 
historic stance in support of civil and 
human rights for all persons 

April 18-26 

In accordance with the Rules of Order, the daily schedule 
of General Conference is as follows: 



8:15 a.m. 


Choral Music 


8:30 a.m. 


Devotional Service 


9:00 a.m. 


Conference business or committee 
meetings 


12:30 p.m. 


Lunch recess 


2:30 p.m. 


Conference business or committee 
meetings 


5:00 p.m. 


Dinner recess 


7:30 p.m. 


Conference business or committee 
meetings 




Sunday, April 21 


All day 


Host Area Program 


7:00 p.m. 


Host Area Program 




Tuesday, April 23 


9:00 a.m. 


Presentation of ecumenical representatives 




Friday, April 26 


10:00 p.m. 


Adjournment of General Conference 



Daily Christian Advocate Advance Edition Workbook 

This volume contains information for delegates to the 1996 General Conference. Included are reports and legislative proposals of the quadrennial study commissions, annual 
conferences, and general boards and agencies of The United Methodist Church. 



J. Richard Peck 
Joan M. Shoup 
Sheila W. McGee 
Neil Alexander 
Robert K Feaster 
Billy Murphy 



Editor 

Associate Editor 

Managing Editor 

Book Editor 

Publisher 

Production Manager 



Carolyn Marshall General Conference Secretary 

Odell Thompson Petitions Secretary 

Roger Kruse General Conference Business Manager 

John Brawn Computer Assistant 



Copy Editors: Martha Cooper, Marvin Cropsey, Michael Fleenor, Mary Ann Haney, Sheila Hewitt, Patty Meyers, Marjorie 
Pierson, John Rudin, Beverly Salmon, Phyllis Weeby 

Daily Ckristian Advocate is published in two advance editions, plus daily editions produced April 16-26 (except Sunday) in Denver. Colorado, during the 1996 General 
Conference, plus a Round-Up edition. Subscriptions: Advance Edition I: $20.00; Advance Edition II: $15.00; Daily Reports mailed first class: $50.00; individual copies sold ii 
Denver. S3. 50; RtmndUp Edition: S2.00 each or $1.50 per copy for 10 or more copies. Nashville Office: 201 Eightfi Avenue South, Nashville, TN 37203. For subscriptions ( 
1-80M72-1789. For editorial matters, call 615-749.6007. 



DCA Advance Edition 



Local Committee, Denver Area 



Bishop of the Denver Area: Mary Ann Swenson 
Chairperson: Paula Johnston 
Interpretation & Education Vice Chair: Sally Geis 
Staffing & Equipment Vice Chair: Tommy Gleaton 
Program Vice Chair: Eddie Kelemeni 
Hospitality Vice Chair: Virginia Chase 
Courtesy Vice Chair: Judy Davis 



Bishop's Hospitality Co-Vice Chairs: David & Jo Pat Dolsen 
Finance Vice Chair: Donald Strait 
Members At Large: Lucia Guzman 

Edward Paup 

Nolan Smith 

Ralph Zimmer 



Judicial Council 



Officers 

President: Tom Matheny, P.O. Box 221, Hammond, LA 

70404 

Vice-President: Sally Curtis Askew, 1603 Montevideo Rd. 

N.E.,Elberton,GA 30635 
Secretary: Wayne Coffin, 4937 N.W. 62 Terrace, Oklahoma 

City, OK 73122 

Members 

Wesley Bailey, 707 Ransom Rd., Winston-Salem, NC 27106 



Evelynn S. Caterson, 904 Marlborough Ave., Absecon, NJ 

08201 
John G. Cony, Box 507, Meharry Medical College, 

Nashville, TN 37208 
Susan T. Henry-Crowe, 316 Cannon chapel, Emory 

University, Atlanta, GA 30322 
Zan W. Holmes, Jr., P.O. Box 150425, Dallas, TX 75315-0425 
Theodore H. Walter, 4809 Colonial Dr., Columbia, SC 29203 



°AV«^cTai|^R«|jH^^^«^ 




REMOVE BACK COVEH AND 
' FASTENER TO INSERT 
NEW EDITIONS 



Delegate Information 



Seating Assignments 
Voting Delegates 



Conference/ 


No. 








Conference/ 


No. 








Concordat Delegates 


Sec 


Row 


Seats 


Concordat 


Delegates 


Sec 


Row 


Seats 


Alabama-West Florida 


14 


D 


5 


1-7 


Eastern Pennsylvania 


14 


B 


7 


1-7 






D 


6 


1-7 






B 


8 


1-7 


Alaska Missionary 


2 


B 


10 


10-11 


Estonia Provisional 


2 


D 


12 


11-12 


Austria Provisional 


2 


B 


12 


7-8 


Finland-Finnish Provisional 2 


C 


10 


11-12 


Baltimore-Washington 


20 


A 


9 


1-10 


Finland-Swreden Provisional 2 


A 


1 


9-10 






A 


10 


1-10 


Florida 


28 


A 


12 


9-12 


Bicol Philippines 














A 


13 


1-12 


Provisional 


2 


B 


11 


8-9 






A 


14 


1-12 


Bulacan Philippines 


2 


B 


3 


11-12 


German East 


2 


D 


7 


9-10 


Bulgaria Provisional 


2 


D 


1 


7-8 


German North 


2 


B 


4 


11-12 


Burundi 


2 


A 


17 


11-12 






















German South 


2 


C 


9 


11-12 


California-Nevada 


12 


c 


19 


1-12 






















German Southwest 


2 


A 


18 


11-12 


California-Pacific 


16 


C 


3 


1-8 






















Great Britain 


4 


C 


3 


9-12 






c 


4 


1-8 






















Holston 


16 


D 


7 


1-8 


Caribbean/the Americas 


2 


A 


19 


9-10 






n 


fi 


1-8 


Central Illinois 


16 


A 


2 


1-8 






LJ 


o 






A 


3 


1-8 


Hungary Provisional 


2 


D 


5 


8-9 






Iowa 


22 


D 


3 


1-12 


Central Luzon 


2 


C 


6 


11-12 






D 
D 


4 
11 


1-10 
1-8 


Central Pennsylvania 


16 


C 


17 


8-12 


Kansas East 


8 






c 


18 


3-12 






















Kansas West 


10 


C 


5 


1-10 


Central Texas 


12 


B 


2 


6-12 






















Kentucky 


8 


D 


1 


9-12 






B 


3 


6-10 






D 


2 


9-12 


Central Zaire 


12 


D 


13 


1-12 






















Liberia 


8 


A 


20 


1-8 


Czech and Slovak 




















Republics 


2 


D 


5 


10-11 


Little Rock 


6 


D 


2 


1-6 


Dakotas 


4 


C 


8 


9-12 


Louisiana 


12 


B 


1 


1-12 


Denmark 


2 


D 


4 


11-12 


Louisville 


8 


A 


2 


9-12 


Desert Southwest 


6 


B 
B 


5 
6 


10-12 
10-12 


Macedonia-Yugoslavia 




A 


3 


9-12 












Provisional 


2 


C 


11 


11-12 


Detroit 


12 


B 


9 


1-12 






















Memphis 


10 


D 


9 


8-12 


East Mindanao 




















Philippines Provisional 


2 


A 


1 


7-8 






D 


10 


8-12 


East Ohio 


22 


C 


1 


1-12 


Mexico 


2 


C 


14 


11-12 






C 


2 


1-10 


Middle Philippines 


2 


A 


19 


7-8 


East Philippines 


2 


A 


10 


11-12 


Mindanao 


2 


D 


15 


9-10 


Eastern Angola 


2 


A 


18 


9-10 


Minnesota 


12 


C 


7 


1-12 



DCA Advance Edition 



Conference/ 
Concordat 

Mississippi 



Missouri East 

Missouri West 
Mozambique 
Nebraska 
New England 

New Mexico 
New York 

Nigeria 
North Alabama 



North Arkansas 
North Carolina 



North Central 
New York 

North Central 
Philippines 

North Georgia 



North Indiana 



North Shaba 

North Texas 
Northeast Philippines 
Northeast Zaire 
Northern Illinois 

Northern New Jersey 

Northern Philippines 



No. 
Delegates Sec Row 



18 



10 

10 

2 

10 

14 

4 
16 

4 
14 



18 

10 

2 
24 

14 



16 

12 
2 
2 

14 



6 

7 

8 

2 

3 

16 

13 

14 

9 

10 

4 

4 

5 

11 

4 

5 

6 

18 

5 

6 



D 12 



19 
16 
17 
7 
8 
9 
11 
12 
18 
14 
11 
10 
11 
1 



Seats 

1-6 

1-6 

1-6 

1-5 

1-5 

1-10 

11-12 

1-10 

1-7 

1-7 

9-12 

1-8 

1-8 

9-12 

9-12 

9-12 

9-12 

1-8 

1-9 

1-9 

1-10 

11-12 

1-12 

1-12 

7-12 

7-12 

11-12 

1-8 

1-8 

1-12 

7-8 

10-11 

1-7 

1-7 

1-6 

11-12 



Conference/ 
Concordat 

Northwest Philippines 
Northwest Texas 
Norway 
Oklahoma 

Oklahoma Indian 
Missionary 

Oregon-Idaho 

Pacific Northwest 

Palawan Provisional 

Peninsula-Delaware 

Philippines 

Poland 

Puerto Rico 

Red Bird Missionary 

Rio Grande 

Rocky Mountain 

Sierra Leone 

South Carolina 

South Georgia 

South Indiana 

Southern Illinois 
Southern New Jersey 
Southern Zaire 
Southwest Philippines 
Southwest Texas 
Sweden 

Switzerland-France 
Tanganyika 
Tennessee 

Texas 

Troy 
Upper Zaire 



No. 
Delegates Sec Row Seats 



2 

6 

2 

20 

2 
6 



2 
2 
2 
2 
2 

10 
2 

22 

14 

16 

6 

10 

8 

2 

10 

2 

2 

2 

10 

24 

6 
2 



B 
A 
D 
C 
C 

C 
B 
D 
D 
C 
D 
C 
D 
B 
B 
B 
D 
B 
B 
B 
B 
C 
C 
D 
C 
D 
B 
B 
D 
B 
A 
B 
B 
C 
C 
B 
D 



10 
17 
8 
10 
11 

18 
14 
20 
6 
6 
6 
2 
7 
15 
12 
4 
2 

21 
22 
19 
20 
8 
9 
1 

13 
19 
14 
15 
15 
19 
11 
7 
8 
20 
21 
20 



8-9 

5-10 

11-12 

1-10 

1-10 

1-2 

1-6 

1-8 

10-11 

3-10 

8-9 

11-12 

11-12 

11-12 

9-10 

1-10 

7-8 

1-12 

1-10 

1-8 

1-6 

1-8 

1-8 

1-6 

1-10 

5-12 

9-10 

1-10 

11-12 

9-10 

9-10 

8-12 

8-12 

1-12 

1-12 

7-12 

9-10 



Delegate Information 



Conference/ 


No. 








Conference/ 


No. 








Concordat 


Delegates 


Sec 


Row 


Seats 


Concordat 


Delegates 


Sec 


Row 


Seats 


Virginia 


30 


C 


15 


1-12 


Wyoming 


6 


B 


12 


1-6 






C 


16 


1-12 


Yellowstone 


2 


B 


14 


11-12 






c 


17 


1-6 


Zimbabwe 


2 


C 


6 


1-2 


Visayas-North Mindanao 
Philippines 

West Michigan 


2 
10 


c 

B 


9 
10 


9-10 
1-10 


Russian Observers 


2 


D 


16 


11-12 


West Middle 
Philippines 

West Ohio 


2 
30 


C 
D 


5 

17 


11-12 
1-12 


General Secretaries 

UMPH General 

Secretary TBA 1 D 


21 


1 






D 


18 


1-12 


Judith Weidman 


1 


D 


21 


2 






D 


19 


1-4 


Thorn White Wolf Fassett 1 


D 


21 


3 


West Virginia 


16 


A 


21 


1-10 


Barbara Boigegrain 


1 


D 


21 


4 


West Zaire 


2 


A 
A 


22 
11 


1-6 
11-12 


GCFA General 
Secretary TBA 




D 


21 


5 


Western Angola 


4 


B 
B 


12 
13 


11-12 
11-12 


C. David Lundquist 
Bruce Robbins 




D 
D 


21 
21 


6 

7 


Western New York 


6 


A 


19 


1-6 


Roger Ireson 




D 


21 


8 


Western North 
Carolina 


28 


A 


15 


1-12 


Barbara Thompson 
Ezra Earl Jones 




D 
D 


21 
21 


9 
10 






A 


16 


1-12 


Stephanie Hkon 




D 


21 


11 






A 


17 


1-4 


Cecelia Long 




D 


21 


12 


Western Pennsylvania 


20 


D 


14 


1-12 


Randolph Nugent 




D 


22 


1 






D 


15 


1-8 


Charles Yrigoyen 




D 


22 


2 


Wisconsin 


12 


C 


12 


1-12 
















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DCA Advance Edition 



Back to Basics 

Lord, Teach Us: The Lord's Prayer & the Christian Life 

by William H. Willimon and Stanley Haueiwas 

This brief introduction to the Christian faith includes Christian behefs, 
practices, character, and ways in which we become and remain Christian. 
After a short introduction, the authors work through each phrase of the 
Lord's Prayer, using it as a framework for the Christian hfe. Providing 
basic faith understanding, this helpful book is appropriate for inquirers, 
as well as Sunday school classes. The book will help the user experience 
Christianity as attractive and inviting, not distant, difficult, 
or foreboding. 



William H. Willimon is Dean of the Chapel and professor of Christian 
Ministry at the Divinity School at Duke University, Durham, 
North Carolina. 



LORD, 

TEACH USi 




@ Cokesbury 



Stanley Hauerwas is professor of Theological Ethics at Duke 

University. He is a well-known teacher, author, seminar ^^^^ qj^ y,gj.p yoUR COKESBURY STORE 

speaker, and cultural critic. 

Published by /O^ ORDER TOLL FREE: 1-800-672-1789 



ISBN 0-687-00614-7. Paper, $7.95 



y-" 



Satisfaction Quaranteed! 



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Essential Elements of United Methodism 



The Book of Discipline of The United Methodist Church, 1996. 

Includes all changes in law established by the 1996 
General Conference. 
DD6-0I9222. $14.95 

The Book of Resolutions of The United Methodist Church, 1996 . 

Features all Resolutions from the 1996 General Conference. 
DD6-019I76. $12.95 

The 1997 United Methodist Directory. Features include 

• Membership information of all UMC jurisdictional offices, news 
services, publications, caucuses, and affiliated ecumenical groups 

• Detailed list of contact persons for UMC agencies, programs, and resources 

• Leader names and addresses of all UMC schools, colleges, and seminaries 

• Alphabetical index of names 
DD6-019192. $8.95 



BOOK of 
DISCIPLINE 



DIRFXTORY 



2-Pack Special— Save 5$! 

DD6-019273. The Book of Discipline and 
The Book of Resolutions. $22.90 
3-Pack Special— Save $8! 

DD6-0 19281. The Book of Discipline. 

The Book of Resolutions. & 1997 UM Directorv. 

$28.85 



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CALL OR VISIT YOUR COKESBURY STORE 
ORDER TOLL FREE: 1-800-672-1 
Satisfaction Quaranteed'. Pnas subject tn L/ian?e with: 

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m 




Delegate Information 



15 



Alphabetical list of Voting Delegates and Reserves 



Clergy are in italics. Committee number follows name. 



Abaya, Efren Mindanao Philippines 

Abemathy, H. S Virginia 

Abesamis, Leodegario R. . . . . Southwest Philippines Prov. 

Abraham, William Southwest Texas 

Abram, Charlotte (9) Nebraska 

Abrams, Marvin B. California-Pacific 

Abrams, Geraldine (8) West Ohio 

Acevedo.JorgeA Florida 

Ackerson, Merlin J. (1) Iowa 

Ackley-Killian, Deborah L Western Pennsylvania 

Acosta, Rebecca S Central Luzon 

Adair. Sharon W. (10) North Texas 

Adams, L Cecile (10) Detroit 

Adams, Freda L (10) New York 

Addison, Rubielee L. South Carolina 

Ade, Hans (2) German Southwest 

Adkins, Paula B Memphis 

Admussen, Betty J. (8) Missouri West 

Afonso, Eduardo Western Angola 

Agbisit, Andrea Mindanao Philippines 

Agnew, Theodore L (8) Oklahoma 

Agtarap, Bener B. Philippines 

Aguayo, Leonardo Mindanao Philippines 

Agustin, Romeo Mindanao Philippines 

Aherrera, Lydia S East Philippines 

Akers, Mary E. (6) Northern Illinois 

Albers, Siegfiied German North 

Albright, John 'Jack' E. (3) Texas 

Albury, Kay F. Baltimore- Washington 

Aldridge, Jr., Julian M. (9) Western North Carolina 

Alegria, Frank Texas 

Alejo, David East Mindanao Philippines Prov. 

Alers, Vanessa Puerto Rico 

Alexander, Anthony C,8) Central Pennsylvania 

Alexander, Dennis J. Minnesota 

Alexander, Betty M. (7) Tennessee 

Alford, Ben /?. (3) Tennessee 

Alford, Joyce L (6) Wisconsin 

Alfred, Champo Southern Zaire 

Aliwalas, Ricardo Bulacan Philippines 

Alkuino, Aurora S. (3) . . . Visayas-North Mindanao Phlpns 

Allen, Georgia Central Texas 

Allen, Robert L Oklahoma 

Alloway, Wayne Nebraska 

Allread, Ardith California-Nevada 

Aim, Beatrice Sweden 

Alsted, Christian (1) Denmark 

Altunian, Bedros Bulgaria Provisional 

Alvarez, Maximo C. Bicol Philippines Provisional 

Alvord, Alec M (6) Western North Carolina 

Ahvine, Betty Western Pennsylvania 



Amerson, Philip A. (8) South Indiana 

Ames III, Guy C. (8) Oklahoma 

Amon, Darlene V. (3) Virginia 

Anderson, James (5) East Ohio 

Anderson, Douglas J. Iowa 

Anderson, Barry //. (3) North Alabama 

Anderson, Rodney Rocky Mountain 

Anderson, Gregory L Southern New Jersey 

Anderson, Gail 0. (7) Wyoming 

Andres, Delfin L (2) .... East Mindanao Philippines Prov. 

Andrews, Christopher H. (3) Louisiana 

Andrews, Duane N. (1) Texas 

Aniag, Pacifico E Bulacan Philippines 

Aoen, Job Mindanao Philippines 

Appleby, Charlie L (2) South Carolina 

Arallano, Billy Mindanao Philippines 

Arant, James S. (10) South Carolina 

Archambeau, Trudy M. (3) West Michigan 

Archer, Anita K. (5) Memphis 

Archibald, Jr., Julius A Troy 

Arciaga, Simeon L Central Luzon 

Argo, A. David Baltimore-Washington 

Arjona,JuanJ. California-Nevada 

Armstrong, Charles /?. (3) South Indiana 

Arnold, Kathy S. (10) Minnesota 

Arnold, Paul J. North Indiana 

Arnold, Jr., W. E. (Buddy) (5) North Arkansas 

Ampriester, Marvin D Iowa 

Arter, Dixie A. (3) North Indiana 

Arthur, Algernon H. G Northern New Jersey 

Ashmos, Donde Plowman (7) Southwest Texas 

Ashton, Mark A. Oklahoma 

Asparuchov, Asparuch Bulgaria Provisional 

Atha, Grayson (',10) West Ohio 

Atienzar, Agustin L East Mindanao Philippines Prov. 

Atkinson, George M. Texas 

Atwood, Judy K. Kansas East 

Aubuchon, David R (4) East Ohio 

Austin, Fred L (2) Holston 

Auvenshine, William R. (3) Central Texas 

Avery, DonaldR. (2) Louisiana 

Ayaki, Andjadiumi West Zaire 

Ayers, Steve California-Pacific 

Aying, Muland K. (10) Southern Zaire 

Backman, Lara Ch Finland-Finnish Provisional 

Bagwell, Timothy J (10) South Georgia 

Bailen, Gregorio R. Central Luzon 

Bailen, Esperanza B Central Luzon 

Bailey, Paul C. (10) Virginia 

Baird, Larry R. Western New York 

Baker, Ted F. Holston 



Legislative Committees 



(1) Church and Society 

(2) Conferences 

(3) Discipleship 

(4) Financial Administration 

(5) General/Judicial Administration 



(6) Global Ministries 

(7) Higher Education and Chaplaincy 

(8) Independent Commissions 

(9) Local Church 

(10) Ordained and Diaconal Ministry 



16 



DCA Advance Edition 



Baker, Lynn R. (1) North Arkansas 

Baker, Jonathan E. (10) Peninsula-Delaware 

Baker, Sandra W. (10) Virginia 

Baker, Jr., Rudolph R. (5) North Georgia 

Batch, William H. Holston 

Baldridge, Mary (1) Baltimore-Washington 

Balentine, Becky (9) North Carolina 

Bales, Linda (6) West Ohio 

Bales, Harold K. (3) Western North Carolina 

Baluntong, Glofie Southwest Philippines Prov. 

Baluntong, Glorioso Southwest Philippines Prov. 

Bamsey, Alfred T. (7) Detroit 

Bank, Genie S. (3) Western New York 

Banks, David A (1) North Carolina 

Bankston, L. James (1) Texas 

Barden, Kathleen B. (3) North Central New York 

Barden, Barbara S Western North Carolina 

Barham, Michp.el P Mississippi 

Barker, Gary C North Carolina 

Bama, David S Wyoming 

Barnes, William S. (6) Florida 

Barnes, Thekna P Mississippi 

Bamett, Jeanne (10) California-Nevada 

Bamett, Vemie T. (3) Central Illinois 

Barney, Bill (1) Troy 

Barr, Robin E. (8) Pacific Northwest 

Barr, Roger W. Pacific Northwest 

Barrera, Miriam A. . . . . Visayas-North Mindanao Phlpns 

Barrett,JoyA. (10) Detroit 

Barrett, Robbie W North Carolina 

Barrier, Edna M Northern New Jersey 

Barrow, Barbara B. Virginia 

Bartel,BruceA (3) Wisconsin 

Bartlow, Michele W. Eastern Pennsylvania 

Barto, Suella C. (10) Central Pennsylvania 

Barton, Patsy Baltimore-Washington 

Base, Darlene Texas 

Bass, Ressie Mae (8) Florida 

Bass, James L Tennessee 

Bassano.Jiri Czech and Slovak Republics 

Baszner, Rob North Indiana 

Bates, Kathryn Texas 

Bates, Jr., William L. (5) Dakotas 

Batiste,Jr., Harold E. (6) Southwest Texas 

Bauknight, Brian K (1) Western Pennsylvania 

Bauman, Dianne R Oklahoma 

Baur, Peter Switzerland-France 

Bauserman, Ralph E. West Ohio 

Baxter, Harlan M. Southern New Jersey 

Bean, Robbie (2) Rocky Mountain 

Beard, Frank North Indiana 

Beard, Herschel Oklahoma 

Beard, Clyde W. West Virginia 

Beck, Brian E. (2) Great Britain 

Beck, Michael R South Indiana 

Becker, Gene R. (9) West Michigan 

Beckley, David L. (4) Mississippi 

Beckum, Robert J. South Georgia 

Beers, Sally J Western Pennsylvania 

Beilke, Nancy C Wisconsin 

Beisner, Judith (3) Baltimore-Washington 

Bell, Sr., Ronald Peninsula-Delaware 

Bender, Kelly B Kansas West 

Benedyktowicz, Olgierd Poland 

Benham, Beth 0. (2) North Central New York 

Bennett, Bruce W. Little Rock 

Bennett, Hazel C South Carolina 

Benoza, Melody Southwest Philippines Prov. 



Benson, Judy J. (6) Oklahoma 

Beppler, Ron (9) Southern New Jersey 

Berbano , Jr. , Mark V. Iowa 

Berck.Jan Nebraska 

Bergdoll, James R Virginia 

Bemes, Dale East Ohio 

Berry, George L Mississippi 

Berte, Neal R. (7) North Alabama 

Besserer, Armin (10) German South 

Bethke, Christine A Wisconsin 

Beveridge, RaeLynn Schlief (10) West Ohio 

Bevins, C. Rex (5) Nebraska 

Biasbas, Lucrecia F Central Luzon 

Bickerton, Thomas J. (5) West Virginia 

Biggins, Moira (6) Great Britain 

Biggs, Jr, Marvin Mouzon (7) Oklahoma 

Bildmann,Jurgen German South 

Bilog, Fidela L East Mindanao Philippines Prov. 

Bilog, Francisco B. East Mindanao Philippines Prov. 

Binder, Peter Switzerland-France 

Birkhahn-Rommelfanger, Betty J. Northern Illinois 

Bishop, Nathaniel L (5) Virginia 

Bjomevik, Per Endre Norway 

Black, Charlene R. (7) South Georgia 

Black, Sr., Aaron D Nebraska 

Blackburn, Jr., Robert M. Western North Carolina 

Blacklock, Gloria J. (6) Southern Illinois 

Blackwell, Shay Missouri East 

Blackwell, Dennis L Southern New Jersey 

Blackwell, Roberta E. (3) Western North Carolina 

Blair, B. Ann (3) Holston 

Blaker, Fallon Eastern Pennsylvania 

Blankenship, Paul F. (10) Memphis 

Blanton, Georjean H. North Texas 

Bledsoe, W. Eari (10) Texas 

Bloem, Claudia A. (1) Switzerland-France 

Boayue, Charles S.G Detroit 

Bobo, Jr., Hiram (5) North Georgia 

Boe, Donna H. (1) Oregon-Idaho 

Boehm, James W. (1) West Michigan 

Bohringer, Norbert German South 

Bolay, Winfried German Southwest 

Boiler, Thomas i?. (4) Yellowstone 

Bond, R. H Memphis 

Bondo, Ndayi North Shaba 

Bonner, Byrd L (5) Southwest Texas 

Booker, R. Jeremiah Texas 

Boone, Ben F. Memphis 

Boozer, Asa Alabama-West Florida 

Bom, Ethel W Virginia 

Bortell, James B. (10) Central Illinois 

Bose, Trina California-Pacific 

Bouton, William D Wyoming 

Bove, Jose P Florida 

Bowdan, Mel (10) Kentucky 

Bowers, Phyllis M. (4) Central Pennsylvania 

Bowers, Troy L Kansas West 

Bowers, Flora J. Pacific Northwest 

Bowersox, Ronald E. (3) Central Pennsylvania 

Bowles, Paul D. (4) Oklahoma 

Bowles, Jr, Albert J. (10) Holston 

Boyd, Gail Central Texas 

Boyd, Troy E. Louisiana 

Boyd, Candi (3) Mississippi 

Boyd, Lane Northwest Texas 

Bradley, Carol Ann (10) West Ohio 

Brady, Edgar Kentucky 

Brady III. Hal N. NorthTexas 



Delegate Information 



17 



Brandt, Robert B. (3) Northern New Jersey 

Branscome, James L. (4) Virginia 

Brantley, Douglas 'Mac' (3) North Georgia 

Braswell, Kermit L (4) North Carolina 

Braun, Reinhold German South 

Brawn, Mel California-Nevada 

Bray, Jr., Jerry G. (7) Virginia 

Brazelton, David L. (8) Florida 

Bretsch, Ronald (6) North Central New York 

Brewer, David T. Florida 

Brewer, Jackson (7) Kentucky 

Brewer, Scott Nebraska 

Briggs, Margie M Missouri West 

Bright, Joyce W Florida 

Brim, Jay Southwest Texas 

Briscoe, I. Carolyn (7) South Carolina 

Brito, Ana Baltimore-Washington 

Brittain, Thomas N. South Carolina 

Brockwell,Jr, Charles W. {^) Louisville 

Brodbeck, Gerhard German South 

Branson, Oswald P. Florida 

Brooks, Gennifer New York 

Brooks, Jane N. North Georgia 

Brooks, Philip D. (1) WestOhio 

Brought, Byron P. Baltimore-Washington 

Browa, Johannes German South 

Brovm, Ruth S. (8) Alabama-West Florida 

Brown, Eva K. Kansas East 

Brown, Kimi (8) Tennessee 

Brown, George S West Ohio 

Broum, Michael B. (7) Western North Carolina 

Brown, Jr, Warner H. (7) California-Nevada 

Brown, Jr., Andrew W. Western North Carolina 

Browne, Amos Missouri West 

Brubaker, Ellen A (4) West Michigan 

Brunkow, Thomas L. Baltimore-Washington 

Bryan, James J Missouri West 

Bryant, Norma L. (8) Texas 

Bryson, Claudette S North Georgia 

Bueg, Donald J Western New York 

Buie, Becky L South Carolina 

Bulaya, Shimba (8) North Shaba 

Bullard, Mary Ellen Alabama-West Florida 

Burdette, Carole East Ohio 

Burgess, Robert L Louisiana 

Burkhart,J. Robert (10) Iowa 

Burkholder, Anne L Florida 

Burlew, Elizabeth J North Central New York 

Burrer, Helmut German South 

Burton, Jeanie P. UtdeRock 

Bunnell, Susanne L. (1) Wisconsin 

Buskirk, James B. (3) Oklahoma 

Butaca, Domingo Palawan Provisional 

Buder, Phyllis (8) Baltimore-Washington 

Butz, Janice 1 Northern Illinois 

Buwalda, Dennis G West Michigan 

Buwalda, Jr., Herb J. North Indiana 

Buxton, Sue Detroit 

Byers, Shirley D. (3) Troy 

ByholtThorsen, Helen Norway 

Byrd, Julian L. (8) Texas 

Caasi, Harrison M. Central Luzon 

Cabaltica, Romeo Mindanao Philippines 

Cabotaje, Amante Visayas-North Mindanao Phlpns 

Cacho, Warlito D Central Luzon 

Cadle, Shirley K. WestOhio 

Cahoon, Pamela A Florida 

Cain, Alfred E. (8) Northern Illinois 



Cajiuat, Toribio C. East Philippines 

Cajiuat, Purita O East Philippines 

Calagui, Domingo Middle Philippines 

Caldwell, Gilbert H. New York 

Caldwell, Kirbyjon (9) Texas 

Callahan, Seoia Louisiana 

Calvert, Jr., Robert A. (7) North Georgia 

Camaso, Trefilo Central Luzon 

Camazo, Tomas C. Philippines 

Campbell, Alonzo J. Louisiana 

Campbell, Randall E. Louisiana 

Campbell, Rufits /?. (1) Minnesota 

Campbell, Dennis M. North Carolina 

Campbell, J Gary WestOhio 

Campbell Hyde, Catherine (10) Great Britain 

Campbell-Marshall, Linda (1) New England 

Campher, Lorena W Southern New Jersey 

Canete, Alejandro P. East Philippines 

Canlas, S. J. Earl P Philippines 

Cansino, Regina R Visayas-North Mindanao Phlpns 

Caole, Simeon C. Central Luzon 

Capen, Beth (1) New York 

Capistrano, Melanio R. (1) Bulacan Philippines 

Capistrano, Eliseo Bulacan Philippines 

Carcano, Minerva G. (5) Rio Grande 

Cardinez, Bernardo M. . . . East Mindanao Philippines Prov. 

Carlet, Romeo C. Central Luzon 

Carlos, Elpidio Visayas-North Mindanao Phlpns 

Carlos, Edward V Visayas-North Mindanao Phlpns 

Carlstrom, Berit (3) Sweden 

Carmichael, M. Susan Western North Carolina 

Camicer, Estelita East Mindanao Philippines Prov. 

Carpenter, Jr., Robert B. (4) Virginia 

Carrico, Ruben G Desert Southwest 

Carrington, John E. (4) New York 

Carruth, Nancy (4) Louisiana 

Carruth, Amanda (7) Memphis 

Carson, Kit (7) Florida 

Carter, Lemuel C. South Carolina 

Carter, Fletcher South Carolina 

Caruso, George North Indiana 

Carver, Rebecca C. (T) Iowa 

Casad, Mary Brooke (3) North Texas 

Casady, Robert L (3) Missouri West 

Case, John M. (3) Mississippi 

Case, Martin A. (I) Mississippi 

Case, Riley (8) North Indiana 

Casey, Robert T. (2) Virginia 

Casipit, Abraham F. Central Luzon 

Castorillo, Nelson East Philippines 

Casuco, Marcelino M. Philippines 

Cauffman, Shirley Virginia 

Causby, Jimmy (5) Western North Carolina 

Caywood, Larry B. North Georgia 

Ceballos, Jesus Rex Central Luzon 

Cera,Jr.,HermogenesC. East Philippines 

Cerdan, Francisco C Central Luzon 

Cervenak, Josef (X) Czech and Slovak Republics 

Chalker, Kenneth W. (J) East Ohio 

Chamberlain, Ray W. Q) Virginia 

Chambers, Chester V. West Ohio 

Chambers, Linda B. Western Pennsylvania 

Chamness, Ben R (T) Texas 

Chandler, J. Edward Alabama-West Florida 

Chaplin, jr., Hammie L (4) South Carolina 

Chase, Dottie (6) East Ohio 

Chatham, Betty J. (9) Mississippi 

Chattin, Terri Rae (1) Baltimore-Washington 



18 



DCA Advance Edition 



Chen, Peter F. (5) California-Nevada 

Chin, Anne California-Nevada 

Chinyam, Yirung Southern Zaire 

Chisangam, Mbal Yav Southern Zaire 

Cho, Seog Whan California-Pacific 

Cho, Brandon I. California-Pacific 

Chow, W.Jing West Ohio 

Christian, Tom L. (2) North Texas 

Christner, Hannelore German South 

Christoph, Gerry B Wisconsin 

Christopher, Ula D Eastern Pennsylvania 

Christy, Betty C Western North Carolina 

Christy, Jr., John H. (9) Western North Carolina 

Chun, Young-Ho Kansas East 

Church, Daniel East Ohio 

Ciampa, Donald J. (2) Central Pennsylvania 

Civalier, Ms A. Troy 

Clapp, Sylvia L (9) Western North Carolina 

Clardy, Jr., James Tennessee 

Clark, Dorothy Davis (10) Baltimore-Washington 

Clark, Terry L (9) Centrallllinois 

Clark,JanetB. Wyoming 

Clark, Jr., Russell M. (9) West Ohio 

Clarke, Lambuth M Virginia 

Clausen, Henning Denmark 

Clayton, Paul F. Memphis 

Clem, Kelly A. (6) North Alabama 

Cleveland, J Fay i4) Western New York 

Clinard, Hubert C. Western North Carolina 

Cloud, Kay (4) Peninsula-Delaware 

Cloyd, Katie J Missouri East 

Cobb, Pat Louisiana 

Cofer, Jr., Charles H. (6) South Georgia 

Colhy, Rhonda 7. (6) Virginia 

Cole, Calvin H. Central Pennsylvania 

Coleman, Robert P. (6) South Indiana 

Colescott, Ted G. Minnesota 

Collett, John H. Tennessee 

Collier, Mark H. East Ohio 

Collier, Theodore C. (5) Missouri West 

Collins, Dorothy (2) Florida 

Collins, Gary A. Minnesota 

Collins, John A New York 

Collins, Janet H Western North Carolina 

Compton, Philip W West Ohio 

Conard, A. Mark Kansas West 

Conklin, Brooke (5) Troy 

Conley, Ellis E. West Virginia 

Connell, Gladwin little Rock 

Connolly, Phillip F. (10) West Ohio 

Conoway, Merlin £>. (7) Mississippi 

Cook, Shirley (2) Detroit 

Cook, M. Olin North Arkansas 

Cook, Beth L (2) North Georgia 

Cook, Carol A Oklahoma 

Cook, Jr., William B. (3) Oregon-Idaho 

Cooke, John D. (5) Western New York 

Cooper, K. Jeannette' West Ohio 

Copeland, Delmas M. Florida 

Corderman, Delos D. (A) South Carolina 

Corley, Cynthia A Virginia 

Comito, Joseph Visayas-North Mindanao Phlpns 

Correia, Franco Eastern Angola 

Corson, John E. California-Nevada 

Cosmiano, David Visayas-North Mindanao Phlpns 

Costill, Chrissy Eastern Pennsylvania 

Cotant, William A Troy 

Cotto, Irving Eastern Pennsylvania 



Cotton-Winn, Carole (5) Louisiana 

Cottrill, Donald C. (6) Louisiana 

Couch, Bill J. Northwest Texas 

Coulter, Vicki S Oklahoma 

Courtoy, Charles W. (4) Florida 

Cox, Danny F. Central Illinois 

Cox, Elizabeth E Florida 

Cox, Stephen L. Missouri West 

Coyner, Michael J. (1) North Indiana 

Craft, Precious B. (8) California-Nevada 

Grain, DightW. (4) New England 

Grain, Judy (8) Wisconsin 

Cramer, Andreas German South 

Cramer-Heuerman, Jean A Centrallllinois 

Crane, Charles W North Alabama 

Crane, David F South Indiana 

Crawford, Kenneth Central Illinois 

Crawford, Avon (9) Iowa 

Crawford, Timothy D Red Bird Missionary 

Crawford, Jim H. Texas 

Crawford, Sr., Joseph L. (6) North Georgia 

Crickard, Elsie (4) Kansas West 

Crisostomo, Salvador East Philippines 

Crocker, Hugh D Western Pennsylvania 

Cromwell, Alice (8) EastOhio 

Cronin, Deborah K. (9) Western New York 

Croom, Ronald Nebraska 

Crosse, James E.W. South Georgia 

Crouch, William C. (10) North Texas 

Crouch, Timothy C North Texas 

Crowder, Merry W. Troy 

Crump, Anita (9) Louisiana 

Crutchfield, Charles (4) New Mexico 

Cruz, Benedicto V East Mindanao Philippines Prov. 

Cruz, Dalila Rio Grande 

Cruz, Remegio F Visayas-North Mindanao Phlpns 

Csemak, Istvan (6) Hungary Provisional 

Csemak, Eva (6) Hungary Provisional 

Cuckler, Nancy East Ohio 

Cummings, Mabel M North Carolina 

Cummins, Marlene Simms Centrallllinois 

Cunanan, Jose Pepito Philippines 

Cunningham, Molly California-Nevada 

Curtis, Bud Detroit 

Gushing, Regina New England 

da Cruz, Bemarda Western Angola 

da Silva, Elvira M. Western Angola 

Daniel, Wesley S.K. Iowa 

Daniels, Lillian M Iowa 

Darby, James E. Kansas East 

Darko, Morrell J North Georgia 

Daroy,Josue Mindanao Philippines 

Darst, Betty (6) West Ohio 

Dass, Emmanuel R. Iowa 

Daughenbaugh, Jr., Howard L. (6) Centrallllinois 

Daugherty, Ruth A. (10) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Daughtery, Vergil L. (3) South Georgia 

Davies, Susan F. (4) Nebraska 

Davis, Rosemary A. California-Pacific 

Davis, Lindsey (3) Kentucky 

Davis, Judy (1) Rocky Mountain 

Davis, Elwood G. (7) Southern New Jersey 

Dawes, Inez (1) Iowa 

Day, R. Randy (1) New York 

Day, Inday (5) New York 

Day, Barbara (10) North Georgia 

de Gusman, Ruben .... East Mindanao Philippines Prov. 
de los Santos, Edna Flor M East Philippines 



Delegate Information 



19 



Deal, Pat M. (1) North Texas 

Deckard, Stephen T. (5) North Central New York 

Declaro, Rhoda Bicol Philippines Provisional 

Deel, WiUiam S. (3) West Virginia 

Deer, Alvin B. (4) Oklahoma Indian Missionary 

Del Pino, Jerome K. (2) New England 

dela Pena, Sonny Palawan Provisional 

Dell, Gregroy R. Northern Illinois 

delos Santos, Elias L Bulacan Philippines 

DeMarcus, Jamima P. (5) Western North Carolina 

Denting, Joan C. (7) Wisconsin 

DeMore, Philip D North Georgia 

Dent, Joel H. South Georgia 

Deocampo, Jeanne G. (3) . . . East Mindanao Phlpns Prov. 

Deriso, Jr., Walter M. (4) South Georgia 

Derr, Donna F Eastern Pennsylvania 

Devadhar, Sudarshana North Central New York 

DeWitt-Droke, Nadine California-Nevada 

Dharmaraj, Glory Central Illinois 

Diaz, Evelyn G East Mindanao Philippines Prov. 

Diaz de Arce, Gabriel H Florida 

Dickert, Marion N Eastern Pennsylvania 

Dillard, Kay B. (1) Northern Illinois 

Dillard,Jr,F. Douglas (5) Virginia 

Dillman, Ilse German South 

Dillon, C. A. (1) North Carolina 

Dillozon.Joel Palawan Provisional 

Dimalanta, Gloria B East Philippines 

Dimas, Jacqueline Northern Illinois 

Dinkins, JoJ North Georgia 

DiPaolo, Joseph (1) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Dirdak, Paul R. (6) California-Nevada 

Disbrow, Rebecca L Desert Southwest 

Diur,Ngaj Southern Zaire 

Dkon, J. D. (7) Louisville 

Dfacon, Floyd Texas 

Dizon, Juanita C Central Luzon 

Djamba, Mundeke Central Zaire 

Djundu, Lunge (7) Central Zaire 

Djungandeke, Pese Central Zaire 

Dockery, Lucille New York 

Dodd, Jr., Chester C West Virginia 

Dodge, David A. Florida 

Dodson, E. Malone (3) North Georgia 

Dolsen, David Rocky Mountain 

Donner, James L Western Pennsylvania 

Dooling, Jerry M. Alabama-West Florida 

Dorris, Karen S Texas 

Dorsey, Frank L. (6) Kansas East 

Douglas, Jr., WillardH. (8) Virginia 

Dove, Carolyn (7) Louisiana 

Dowdy, Roger C. (9) Virginia 

Dowdy, Kristen E. (7) Virginia 

Dowell, Jean (9) Minnesota 

Downs Rosa, Melanie A Rocky Mountain 

Doyle, Lin (1) Yellowstone 

Drachler, Stephen E. (8) Central Pennsylvania 

Drewry, Virginia P North Georgia 

Dude, Karleen L Central Illinois 

Duel, Nancy D. (10) Northern Illinois 

Dufresne, Sandra F. Eastern Pennsylvania 

Duger, Sharon L. (1) North Central New York 

Dumag, Rolando Southwest Philippines Prov. 

Dumlao, Eleanor S East Mindanao Philippines Prov. 

Duncan, Jean-Pierre (1) Wyoming 

Dundas, Charlie O. (2) Minnesota 

Dungalen, Osias L East Philippines 

Dungan, Karen N. Iowa 



Dunlap, Catherine (10) East Ohio 

Dunlap, Nancye K. (10) Missouri East 

Dupitas, Benjamin Mindanao Philippines 

Durham, Jr., Frederick L North Texas 

Duro-on, Pedro N. East Mindanao Philippines Prov. 

DuVall, George (9) Baltimore-Washington 

Dyck, Sally (1) East Ohio 

Earl, Dorothy M. (6) Wyoming 

Easley,Ida South Indiana 

Eberhart, Penelope (3) Dakotas 

Eberhart, Diane W. (4) Iowa 

Ehlen, Thomas W (10) Louisville 

Edgar, John W. West Ohio 

Edgerly, Cynthia (8) New England 

Edmonds, Claude A Eastern Pennsylvania 

Edmondson, Christina California-Pacific 

Edwards, Alma B. (5) Detroit 

Edwards, Neriah G East Ohio 

Edwards, P. Jackson Holston 

Edwards, Barbara J New York 

Edwards, Marion M. (6) South Georgia 

Edwards, Tena R. Southern Illinois 

Egler, Gerhard German South 

Ehlers, Don C. (10) Missouri West 

Ehrman, James W East Ohio 

Ehrman, Kenneth P. East Ohio 

Ekoko, Onema (6) Central Zaire 

Eliasson, Ann-Marie Sweden 

Elkins, Lyman E. (9) West Virginia 

Elliot, Patricia West Ohio 

Elliott, Roger V. North Carolina 

Elliott, Ruth F North Central New York 

Ellison, Betty G North Georgia 

Ellisor,J. Walter (Si) Alabama-West Florida 

Els, Albrecht German Southwest 

Emmett, Maty Grey Western Pennsylvania 

Emswiler, Sharon Neufer (5) Central Illinois 

Engelhardt, Carolyn H New York 

England, Stan B. (8) North Georgia 

Englund, Hakan Sweden 

Ernst, Sally (5) Western Pennsylvania 

Ervin,Jr.,PaulR. (3) North Georgia 

Erwin, Max G. (7) Western North Carolina 

Eschbach, Urs Switzerland-France 

Eschmann, Holger German South 

Espinoza, Lorena East Ohio 

Espinoza, Modesto East Ohio 

Espinoza, Samuel J. Virginia 

Estioko, Adelina A. Central Luzon 

Estioko, Jr., Manuel B. Central Luzon 

Etherton, Rayford L. North Alabama 

Etter, Martha B. (3) Southwest Texas 

Eubank, Rocky Southwest Texas 

Euper, Jacqueline K. (3) Detroit 

Euper, Terry A Detroit 

Eurey, Charles W. (4) Western North Carolina 

Evans, Kyle B. Missouri West 

Evans, Jr., CasharW. (4) North Carolina 

Evdng.Jack Dakotas 

Ewing, E. Keith (2) Florida 

Exiomo, Edwin Mindanao Philippines 

Extrum-Femandez, Paul (2) California-Nevada 

Extrum-Femandez, Renae D. (10) .... California-Nevada 

Fagan, Larry R. (2) Missouri West 

Fajardo, Benjamin Mindanao Philippines 

Fang, Marcus (5) Wisconsin 

Farmer, Penny Dollar (8) North Carolina 

Farrell, Leighton K. (4) North Texas 



20 



DCA Advance Edition 



Farris, Patricia E. (5) California-Pacific 

Fauser, Kurt German South 

Feist, Caroline North Alabama 

Felder, Charles B. Mississippi 

Fellers, Jim Alaska Missionary 

Fenn, Philip J. (10) Oklahoma 

Fenner, Elizabeth A. (6) Missouri West 

Fenstermacher, Mark North Indiana 

Fenstermacher, Anita North Indiana 

Ferguson, Sandra (5) Baltimore-Washington 

Ferguson, Tyson Detroit 

Ferguson, Phyllis S. (3) Pacific Northwest 

Fernandez, Arturo M. Oregon-Idaho 

Fernando, Ruben West Middle Philippines 

Ferrer, Rufino Visayas-North Mindanao Phlpns 

Ferrer, Jr., Comelio R Philippines 

Fields, Lynette (8) Florida 

Finklea, W. Ray Florida 

Finlayson-Schuler, Ted North Central New York 

Fischer, Bemd D. (1) German South 

Fisher, Violet L. (10) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Fisher, A. Mickey South Carolina 

Fisher, Mark A South Indiana 

Fisher, Tom (2) Tennessee 

Fitch, Douglass E. California-Nevada 

Fitch, Marion 0. (2) West Ohio 

Fleming, Gert German East 

Fleming, Christina J West Michigan 

Flinn, Jr., Thomas W Baltimore-Washington 

Flores, Jose M. Bulacan Philippines 

Flores, Maximo M. East Philippines 

Flores, Anastacio Mindanao Philippines 

Flynn, Shirley E West Virginia 

Fogle, Dolly (3) South Carolina 

Foley, Emma DeU (9) California-Pacific 

Foockle, Harry F. (9) Missouri West 

Fooshee, Dale L. (2) Kansas East 

Forbes, Janet (.5) Rocky Mountain 

Ford, Pamela H. Central Pennsylvania 

Ford, Lenora Thompson (4) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Forrest, Martha H. (7) North Georgia 

Foster, Nancy K. (7) Oklahoma 

Foster, L. Daniel Pacific Northwest 

Foster, James W. {2) Texas 

Foster, S. Stephen (10) Wisconsin 

Fowler, Lloyd (Bud) F Florida 

Fowler, James A. South Indiana 

Fowlkes, Nancy (6) New York 

Fox, Robert H. Florida 

Fox, H. Eddie Holston 

Francis, Lufunda (9) Southern Zaire 

Francisco, Ciriaco Q Bulacan Philippines 

Frazee, Bill C Missouri East 

Frazer, E. Eugene (4) West Ohio 

Frazier, William O. Southern Illinois 

Frazier, Sr., Robert C. (3) North Carolina 

Frederick, Jr., Austin (10) Southwest Texas 

Fredsby, Bent (4) Denmark 

Freeman, Robert K. '. . . Central Illinois 

Fujiu, Kiyoko Kasai Northern Illinois 

Fukomoto, Jo Ann Y. (1) California-Pacific 

Fuller, Cynthia R. (6) Central Pennsylvania 

Funk, Thomas L Western Pennsylvania 

Furman, Jr., Frank H. (4) Florida 

Fux, Gottfiied Austria Provisional 

Gagarin, Josephine M Central Luzon 

Gagno, Reyn^do A. (3) Mindanao Philippines 

Galang, Ernesto Middle Philippines 



Gallagher, Marianne J Oregon-Idaho 

Galloway, Mary Ann (9) West Ohio 

Ganzle, Sigrid German South 

Garcia, Barbara P. (10) Tennessee 

Gardner, Andrew J. (10) Kansas East 

Garibay, Dante C Central Luzon 

Garibay, Limerio C (6) East Philippines 

Gam, Cyndy L West Ohio 

Gamhart, Thomas O. Wisconsin 

Garrett, Doris Ann Mindanao Philippines 

Garrett, Joel S. (8) Western Pennsylvania 

Garrison, LangdonH. Alabama-West Florida 

Gary, Vicki L Mississippi 

Caspar, Miguel Western Angola 

Gaspard,Joan Central Texas 

Gates, Mary H Minnesota 

Gates, Jim R Pacific Northwest 

Gause, Carolyn Baltimore-Washington 

Gaylord, Frank R. Wisconsin 

Gentry, James E. (9) South Indiana 

Georgi, Christoph German East 

Gerente, Nestor S East Philippines 

Gerhard, June A. (9) West Ohio 

Gibson, Thomas D. (9) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Gibson, Mildred W. (6) Western North CaroUna 

Gilbert, Ron W Oklahoma 

Giles, Ruth L Baltimore-Washington 

Gilland,Jim C. Western North Carolina 

Gillis,Jr.,R. Franklin Virginia 

Gilreath, Judy M North Texas 

Gleason, Carol California-Nevada 

Gleaton, Tommy D Rocky Mountain 

Cleaves, Edith L North Carolina 

Goehring, Carol W. North Carolina 

Gains, Sr., Edgar S. Louisville 

Goldman, June P. (5) Iowa 

Goldschmidt, Victor W. (5) North Indiana 

Gomes, Antonia Z. (6) Western Angola 

Gomez, Julita R. Philippines 

Gomez, Roberto L Rio Grande 

Gonzales, Annie J. Northern Illinois 

Gonzalez, Jr., Manuel E Philippines 

Good, Menno E. (2) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Good, Mary Hicks Wisconsin 

Goodgame, Gordon C (5) Holston 

Goodpastor, Larry M. (10) Mississippi 

Goodwin, Tom P Alabama- West Florida 

Goodwin, Dick (3) New Mexico 

Goodwin, Galen L. (10) Northern New Jersey 

Gordon, Jinny (3) Central Illinois 

Gordon, Tyrone T. (9) Kansas West 

Gordon, Betty S West Virginia 

Goss, Nettie J North Arkansas 

Gotz, Matthias German North 

Goudie, Robert F. (9) Detroit 

Gragg, James P. Oklahoma 

Granger, Philip /?. (3) North Indiana 

Grasle, Paul German South 

Gray, Stefanie A. (7) California-Pacific 

Gray, Jon R. (1) Missouri West 

Gray, Aaron M. (9) Rocky Mountain 

Gray, Kay C. Tennessee 

Gray, Eileen (6) Western Pennsylvania 

Greathouse, Lowell R. (.5) Oregon-Idaho 

Green, Mareyjoyce (7) East Ohio 

Green, John H. Florida 

Green, James R. Holston 

Green, H. Sterling (9) Peninsula-Delaware 



Delegate Information 



21 



Greene, Paul S Central Illinois 

Greene, Daryle E. (2) Missouri East 

Greenway, J^ey £ (3) Western Pennsylvania 

Gregory, Terry P North Arkansas 

Grey, ITielnia (8) Western Pennsylvania 

Grieb, Thomas fi. (4) Louisville 

Grier, Dianne B Iowa 

Griffith, Daniel (2) East Ohio 

Griffith, Jr., Frank J. (10) South Carolina 

Groseclose,AlanD. (4) Holston 

Gross, Richard F. (3) New England 

Grossman, Gail F Pacific Northwest 

Grubb, Donna Central Pennsylvania 

Gruneke, Christel (3) German North 

Guarin, Abraham C. Central loizon 

Guerrero, Anacleto G East Philippines 

Guest, Donald F. Northern Illinois 

Guidry, Francis E.W. Texas 

Gulick, Tom North Texas 

Gulinello, Frank (7) New England 

Gunther, Thomas German East 

Gunther, Andreas German East 

Gustafson, Gus M. North Georgia 

Guzman, JosueR. East Mindanao Philippines Prov. 

Guzman, Noel Mindanao Philippines 

Gwinn, Al (6) Kentucky 

Haas, Jerry P. Desert Southwest 

Haase, Becky (8) California-Pacific 

Habacon, AraceU E East Philippines 

Hagiya, Grant J. (8) California-Pacific 

Hairston, William I. (5) West Virginia 

Hakeem, Berty Northern Illinois 

Halderman, Sharon D. (J) Central Pennsylvania 

Hall, Darlene Nebraska 

Hall, Russell C. North Central New York 

Holler, Laurie A West Michigan 

Hallett, Helga P. (10) West Virginia 

Halloway, Eke A. (5) Sierra Leone 

Halter, Kenneth Detroit 

Hamill, Raymond L Wyoming 

Hamilton, Hattie G. (6) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Hamilton, Tom W. (10) Florida 

Hamilton, Richard M. New England 

Hamilton-Kenney, Thomas M. Central Illinois 

Hamley, Scott Western Pennsylvania 

Hamon, C. Mac South Indiana 

Hamrick, Leon (2) North Alabama 

Han, James (2) East Ohio 

Han, Sang-Hyu West Ohio 

Hand, Donald J Southwest Texas 

Handy, Doris M Western Pennsylvania 

Hanke, Gilbert C. (3) Texas 

Hansen, Lei/A Norway 

Hardcastle, James (7) Peninsula-Delaware 

Hardin, Jr., E. Wannamaker . . . . Western North Carolina 

Hardinger, Adam Baltimore-Washington 

Hardman, Ronald L Virginia 

Hardwick, Judy L Central Illinois 

Hargrave, Michelle M. Minnesota 

Harman, Christine (1) Louisville 

Hamish,John E. Detroit 

Hamish,JamesA. (9) Florida 

Harper, Barbara E. North Alabjmia 

Harper, Ruth E. North Carolina 

Harper, Polly G. (5) South Carolina 

Harr, Bonnie D Western Pennsylvania 

Harrell, Sr.,James A. (2) Western North Carolina 

Harris, Joseph L (1) Oklahoma 



Hartman, Shawn (3) Central Pennsylvania 

Harvey, William R. East Ohio 

Harvey, Andrew C. Western Pennsylvania 

Hasemeyer, Bill (3) Nebraska 

Hassinger, Susan W. (3) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Hataway,Joan (9) Texas 

Hataway, Bill Texas 

Hatcher, William 'Bill' S. (5) South Georgia 

Hathcock, Philip L. (10) North Arkansas 

Hausman, Sharon i4. (2) West Ohio 

Haverstock, Zedna M. (4) Central Pennsylvania 

Hawke, Marybelle Western Pennsylvania 

Hayenga, Mary (1) Dakotas 

Hayes, Jr., Robert E. (5) Texas 

Haygood, David T South Georgia 

Heare, Jerry (8) Southwest Texas 

Hearin, Gerry Af. (5) North Alabama 

Hechanova, Sharon C. . . . Visayas-North Mindanao Phlpns 

Hecker, Frigyes Hungary Provisional 

Hefley, Chuck E. (1) North Indiana 

Heidler, Hartmut German East 

Heisler, Benton R. West Michigan 

Heissler, Udo German South 

Helliesen, Oyvind (10) Norway 

Hembrador, Phoebe L . . Visayas-North Mindanao Phlpns 

Henderson, Curtis J. (3) Alabama-West Florida 

Henderson, Betty A Eastern Pennsylvania 

Henderson, Jean (10) Holston 

Henderson, Dolores H. {8) New York 

Henderson, Gwen C. (8) North Carolina 

Henderson, Cornelius L (8) North Georgia 

Henderson, Ronald D. (jo) North Texas 

Henderson, Michael B South Carolina 

Henry, Earnest L Mississippi 

Henry, Daniel (3) Northern Illinois 

Henry, William R. (2) Oklahoma 

Henry, Sr., Luther W. Central Texas 

Hensler, Gisela German Southwest 

Hensley, Basil A West Virginia 

Hermano, Santos C. .... East Mindanao Philippines Prov. 

Hernandez, Andrew Texas 

Herrmann, Hans-Wilhelm German North 

Herrmann, Siegfried German Southwest 

Herrrmann, Ludwig German East 

Hershberger, Jill S Kansas East 

Hershberger, Nyle (10) Western Pennsylvania 

Hess, Kay South Indiana 

Hetzner, Armin German South 

Hicks-Caskey, W. Sue Holston 

Hill, Judith C. (6) Central Pennsylvania 

Hill, Teresa E. Florida 

Hill, Philip D. LouisvUle 

Hill, Robert North Central New York 

Hill, Ed H. (5) Northwest Texas 

Hill, Shirley Southwest Texas 

Hill, L Douglas (2) Virginia 

Hill, Martha West Ohio 

Hilliard, David M (3) Memphis 

Hillman, Byrd (4) Mississippi 

Hines, William A. {%) West Ohio 

Hinshaw, M. Creede South Georgia 

Hinson, William H. (3) Texas 

Hinton,Jr., CoyH. North Georgia 

Hipwell, Ronald J. Western Pennsylvania 

Hirata, Richard Baltimore-Washington 

Hodges, Larry T. (9) Oklahoma 

Hoffinan, Irene Peninsula-Delaware 

Hoffman, Elizabeth (4) Southern New Jersey 



22 



DC A Advance Edition 



Hoffman, David L West Ohio 

Hogberg,Bo Sweden 

Hoke, Sandra F. Northern Illinois 

HolifieldJ- Anthony (7) North Arkansas 

Holliday, Jerry Kansas East 

Hollins, McCallister {2) North Georgia 

Hollis, C. Waymon North Arkansas 

Holmes, William A. {7) Baltimore-Washington 

Holmes, Lucinda S Oklahoma 

Holsinger, Jim (5) Kentucky 

Holston, Charles A. Alabama-West Florida 

Holston, L Jonathan North Georgia 

Holt, Nathan Desert Southwest 

Holt, Gloria (1) North Alabama 

Holtsclaw, Thomas G. (3) North Carolina 

Hood, Andrea New York 

Hook,JayW Detroit 

Hopkins, David CentralTexas 

Hopkins, Carolyn J. (7) South Georgia 

Hopkins, John L (4) South hidiana 

Hopson, Cyntha B Memphis 

Hopson, Roger A (1) Memphis 

Home, Edward C. New York 

Horst, Mark L Minnesota 

Horton,JohnE. (9) South Georgia 

Horton,AlvinJ (8) Virginia 

Hoshibata, Robert T. (1) Pacific Northwest 

House, Donald R. (4) Texas 

Howard, J N. (.9) Holston 

Howard, Charles E North Alabama 

Howell, H. Sharon (5) Kansas East 

Howell, Jr, Robert J South Carolina 

Howie, Bill F. (1) Western North Carolina 

Howie, Richard A. Western North Carolina 

Hsu, Leo L California-Pacific 

Huber, PaulW Virginia 

Huber-Hohls, Ruth (9) CentralTexas 

Huckaby, Jr., Robert L (10) North Carolina 

Huffman, Joel E. (4) Desert Southwest 

Hughen, Richard New England 

Huie,JaniceRiggleK (9) Southwest Texas 

Hulick, Elizabeth 'Betsy" (8) Virginia 

Hunsinger, Robert G New York 

Hunter, Craig A East Ohio 

Hunter HI, George G. (2) Florida 

Huntington, Marilynn M. California-Pacific 

Huston, Joseph D. (2) West Michigan 

Hutchins, Charles A. (10) South Carolina 

Hutchinson, Larry R. Louisville 

Hutchinson, William (10) New Mexico 

Hutchinson, Charles L. (1) South Indiana 

Hutchison, Larry (2) Southern Illinois 

Hutton, Lynn W Holston 

Ibasco, Abelardo Philippines 

Icaza-Willetts, Migdalia L Florida 

Iceman, Anita L (5) Desert Southwest 

ldom,Jr,Matt Texas 

Ilunga, Kaseya (1) North Shaba 

Ingram, Betsy (3) New York 

Imnan,JackC Florida 

Ireland, Jeffrey Iowa 

Irwin, Jr., Thomas H. Central Pennsylvania 

Mil, Takayuki New York 

Isnes, Anders (9) Norway 

Iwig, James H. Kansas West 

Jackson, Betty R California-Pacific 

Jackson, Gregory K. Pacific Northwest 

Jackson, Robert M Texas 



Jackson, Kenneth J. (9) Virginia 

Jackson, Ward (3) Virginia 

Jacob, Angel Palawan Provisional 

Jacobs, Thomas H. Central Pennsylvania 

Jacobsen, Svein Norway 

James, Rachel S. (8) Louisville 

Janka,JohnA Southern New Jersey 

Jantzen, Vernon G Kansas West 

Jarrett, Joseph AM. (1) Sierra Leone 

Jarrett, Sue C. (2) West Virginia 

Jarvis, David F. Virginia 

Jarvis, Patricia A West Virginia 

Jasper, David E. West Virginia 

Jayne, Carlos C. (6) Iowa 

Jelinek, Robert V North Central New York 

Jelinek, Patricia B North Central New York 

Jenkins, Alonza C. South Carolina 

Jenkins, Harry R. West Virginia 

Jennings, Irwin £. (9) East Ohio 

Jennings, James F. (9) Florida 

Jennings, W. R Kentucky 

Jensen, Irene Khin Khin Minnesota 

Jesus de, Edgar A. Philippines 

Jetter, Armin German South 

John, Emmy L Northern Illinois 

Johns, JuneA. Florida 

Johnson, Peggy Ann (2) Baltimore-Washington 

Johnson, Duane R. (4) California-Pacific 

Johnson, C. Annie Central Illinois 

Johnson, Alfred (5) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Johnson, Dan (7) Florida 

Johnson, Jane H. (6) North Carolina 

Johnson, Norman R. North Georgia 

Johnson, Charles I North Indiana 

Johnson, Carolyn E. (6) North Indiana 

Johnson, Charles L (5) South Carolina 

Johnson, H. Sam (9) South Carolina 

Johnson, Mary Texas 

Johnson, Thelma L. (5) West Ohio 

Johnson, Michael D West Ohio 

Jones, Everett Baltimore-Washington 

Jones, Cynthia A (8) Central Illinois 

Jones, Jon W. (5) Kansas West 

Jones, Dale (4) Kentucky 

Jones, Donna Kentucky 

Jones, Chester R. (3) Little Rock 

Jones, Ida F. T North Georgia 

Jones, James J. North Indiana 

Jones, Scott J. (9) North Texas 

Jones, Brian N. (3) South Indiana 

Jones, Richard H. (9) Wisconsin 

Josselyn, Lynne New England 

Joyner,Jr.,F. Belton (10) North Carolina 

Juan, Rodolfo (Rudy) A Philippines 

Junga, Klaus E German North 

Junk, Tom M. (1) Oklahoma 

Justice, Jean Fitch (10) Minnesota 

Ka-Kabamba, Kazadi North Shaba 

Kabwende, Numbi North Shaba 

Kafimbo, Shimbi (5) North Shaba 

Kail, Edward A (9) Iowa 

Kalume Mayombo, Mwepu North Shaba 

Kamara, Abass Western Pennsylvania 

Kammerer, Charlene P. (10) Florida 

Kang, Youngsook C. (8) Rocky Mountain 

Kapend, Musumb (1) Southern Zaire 

Kapumba, Isolo (5) Southern Zaire 

Kasiguran, Aluida L East Philippines 



Delegate Information 



23 



Kasiguran,Jr.,CiriloR. East Philippines 

Kasongo, Disashi Central Zaire 

Katemuna, Monga (2) North Shaba 

Katokane, Mande North Shaba 

Katokane, Mande (4) North Shaba 

Kavund, Kapend Southern Zaire 

Kavwala Matanda, Ngoy (7) Tanganyika 

Kawasaki, Matt Louisiana 

Kayeke, Nguz Southern Zaire 

Kayinda, Mujinga (4) Southern Zaire 

Kea, Donald M. South Georgia 

Keahey, La Verne Little Rock 

Keaton, Jonathan D. (5) Northern Illinois 

Keck, Duane J. (10) Alabama-West Florida 

Keck, Matthew C Northern Illinois 

Keels, Bernard 'Skip' (6) Baltimore-Washington 

Keels, Christine (6) Baltimore- Washington 

Kelemeni, Eddie Rocky Mountain 

Kellerman, James G Detroit 

Kelley, Erin E Western North Carolina 

Kelsey.JoanT West Michigan 

Kelso, Scott r. (7) West Ohio 

Kemha, Djamba West Zaire 

Kennedy, Judy Central Pennsylvania 

Kent, Harry R South Carolina 

Kerber, Joyce B Missouri West 

Kerscher, Horst (9) German Southwest 

Kester, Susan K. (6) Peninsula-Delaware 

Kettner, Hans-Peter German Southwest 

Key, Jewell C Western North Carolina 

Kichibi, Mukalayi (4) Tanganyika 

Kiebling, Dieter (8) German East 

Kiesey, Deborah L (8) Iowa 

Kilimbo, Kajoba Southern Zaire 

Kilpatrick, Joe W. (9) North Georgia 

Kim, MyungJ. (9) Virginia 

Kim, In Muk Western North Carolina 

Kimba, Kasongo (3) North Shaba 

Kimbrough, Walter L North Georgia 

Kimmelman, Linda S. New York 

Kincaid, Sr.,J. LaVon (2) Western Pennsylvania 

Kinchaloe, Beatrice (1) Holston 

Kindschi, Rik (1) Wisconsin 

King, Ryann Kansas East 

King, Charles B. Virginia 

King, Jr., James R. (5) Tennessee 

Kinkundulu, Nyembo North Shaba 

Kirk, R.L(9) Northwest Texas 

Kirkwood, William C New York 

Kitenge Moma, Lusanga Tanganyika 

Kitterman, Sarah (8) Iowa 

Kizer, Mary K. Western North Carolina 

Kjemald, Margareta Sweden 

Klein, Robert E California-Pacific 

Weinhempel, Maria German East 

Klement, Birgit German East 

Klix, Christian German South 

Knight, Gary //. (9) Mississippi 

Knight, Margaret F. (1) North Georgia 

Knight, Suzanne P. (10) West Virginia 

Knoller, Heidelore German South 

Knoller, Horst German South 

Knowles, Grady (4) California-Nevada 

Kober, Friedhelm (6) German East 

Kohlhammer, Reiner German South 

Kohlhepp, Glenn B. (4) Western Pennsylvania 

Konge, Makese (9) North Shaba 

Kra/i, Irene German North 



Krause, Mary Lou Texas 

Krill, Caryl West Ohio 

Krizova, Jana (3) Czech and Slovak Republics 

Kroslid, Sigmund Norway 

Kumbe, Alua (9) Central Zaire 

Kwak, Cheol H. California-Pacific 

Kwon, Duk Kyu (10) Northern Illinois 

LaBarr,Joan G. (5) North Texas 

Labasan, Imelda F. Central Luzon 

LaBoone, Faye Mississippi 

Lacaria,J. F. (1) West Virginia 

Lacaulan,JosueM. (9) Central Luzon 

Ladd, Keith M. (7) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Ladia, Roberto (1) Mindanao Philippines 

Ladia, Vinaflor Mindanao Philippines 

LaGree, Kevin R. North Georgia 

Laishi, Bwalya Southern Zaire 

Lamorena, Crispiniano E Central Luzon 

Lanberg, Georgi Estonia Provisional 

Landis, C. Robert Red Bird Missionary 

Lane, James Oim) W. (3) North Arkansas 

Longford lU, Thomas (Andy) A. (5) Western North Carolina 

Lapac.Jose Visayas-North Mindanao Phlpns 

Lasch, Gabriele German East 

Lasher, William A Troy 

Lathem, Warren R. North Georgia 

Latonero, Simeon L East Philippines 

Lau,AnneH California-Nevada 

Lauchle,PaulA Central Pennsylvania 

Lautzenheiser, Ray East Ohio 

Lawson, Jr., James M. (1) California-Pacific 

Laycock, Evelyn (3) Holston 

Leatherman, Sharon (4) Baltimore-Washington 

Leathrum, Nancy R. Peninsula-Delaware 

Lee, Linda Detroit 

Lee, Kum (9) New England 

Lee, Charles H. (8) North Alabama 

Lee, Frank T Tennessee 

Leeland, Paul L North Carolina 

Lefelar, Donald E. (10) East Ohio 

Legaspi, Noel S East Philippines 

Legaspi, Dominador C. Philippines 

Lehman, Donald A. (1) Alabama-West Florida 

Lehman, Katharine (10) North Indiana 

Lemmel, Barbara (10) Troy 

Lenga, Okodiembo Central Zaire 

Lenge, Kasongo (1) North Shaba 

Lenk, Stefan German East 

Leonhardt, Theo German South 

Letana, Reynaldo F. Bicol Philippines Provisional 

Letana, Ruben M. Philippines 

Lett, Steven T. (5) West Michigan 

Leverett, H. Robert North Alabama 

Lewis, Sinclair E. South Carolina 

Lewis, Patricia ^4. (2) Western North Carolina 

Lightner, Roy Tennessee 

Lilja, Joan M Minnesota 

Lilleoja, Tarmo (6) Estonia Provisional 

Lindell,Rolf{2) Sweden 

Ling, Stanley T. (2) West Ohio 

Link, Joanne M. Central Pennsylvania 

Linn, Cheryl E Kansas West 

Lippse, Charles £. (4) Holston 

Litalema, Bogenda (9) Upper Zaire 

Little, Laura J North Carolina 

Litton, Alice Kentucky 

Livingston, David S. (7) Kansas East 

Livingston, Lawrence M. Peninsula-Delaware 



24 



DCA Advance Edition 



Loberiano, Abel Visayas-North Mindanao Phlpns 

Lx)ckaby, Bob Holston 

Locke, Toni L Tennessee 

Lodewigs, Siegfried German North 

Lodi. Pungumbu (2) Central Zaire 

Loel), Carol Southwest Texas 

Logan, James C. (7) Virginia 

Lomami, Pena Central Zaire 

Long, Nellie Oklahoma Indian Missionary 

Lopemba, Anker T. Upper Zaire 

Lopez, Warlita A. Central Luzon 

Lorico, Samuel J. (1) Bicol Philippines Provisional 

Loudner, Bonnie L West Ohio 

Lourenco, Engracia A. Western Angola 

Lowry, Jerry North Carolina 

Lowry, John M. (1) Southwest Texas 

Lowther, MaryV West Virginia 

Loy, 0. F. (4) Louisiana 

Loyd, Marilynn N. (4) Little Rock 

Lucas, Pag-AsaT East Philippines 

Lucas, Aubrey K. (7) Mississippi 

Lucena, Harvey M. (6) .... Bicol Philippines Provisional 

Lucero, Rhodie A East Mindanao Philippines Prov. 

Luckert, Dorothy Soufliem Illinois 

Luis, Segunda Western Angola 

Lukamba, Kalonda Central Zaire 

Luke, Jr., Wendell New England 

Lumasa, Shala Central Zaire 

Lundgren, Christer Sweden 

Lupaka, Tshita (1) Central Zaire 

Lupdag, Anselmo D Central Luzon 

Lutz, Sandra W. (10) East Ohio 

Lutz, Benis (4) West Ohio 

Lux, William E owa 

Lyght, Ernest S. (6) Northern New Jersey 

Lyman, Mary Grace New York 

Lynn, Shirley G Memphis 

Macabuag, Rafael M. (3) Palawan Provisional 

Macadenden, Benjamin A. Visayas-North Mindanao Phlpns 

Macelhannon, Jean 'Dodie' B South Georgia 

Magdowski, Axel German North 

Magna, Catalino Middle Philippines 

Magno, Elvira West Middle Philippines 

Magtanong, Ricardo West Middle Philippines 

Mahle, Kathi Austin (5) Minnesota 

Maj, Ryszard (3) Poland 

Malale Mupika, Ngoie North Shaba 

Malicki, Andrzej Poland 

Mallory, Gabrielle G. (1) West Ohio 

Mallory, Margaret M. (8) West Ohio 

Moloney, Alfred S. Eastern Pennsylvania 

Mamaclay, Amelia Mindanao Philippines 

Manabat, Cristina N Bulacan Philippines 

Mande, Makonga North Shaba 

Mann, Reinhold German East 

Manson, Carolyn P South Georgia 

Manuel, Nathaniel S. Philippines 

Manuel, Rodrigo Visayas-North Mindanao Phlpns 

Manya, Diamba Central Zaire 

MarceUus, Etta W Western North Carolina 

Marchbanks, Paul K (6) Holston 

Maregmen, Maximino . . . Visayas-North Mindanao Phlpns 

Mariano, Carol A Pacific Northwest 

Mariano, liz P Philippines 

Marlowe, Deborah A North Georgia 

Marquardt, Manfred German North 

Marques, Regina (4) Western Angola 

Marquez, Cesar Mindanao Philippines 



Marr, Betty Southwest Texas 

Marshall, Carolyn M. (10) South Indiana 

Marshall, Linda Yellowstone 

Martin, Stephen East Ohio 

Martin, Flo S. (2) Soudi Georgia 

Martinez, Rolando C. East Philippines 

Masengele, Ngoy North Shaba 

Mason, Betty Sue (6) Florida 

Mason, Howard (3) Peninsula-Delaware 

Mason, John A. (1) West Virginia 

Massey, Mary Alice (3) Florida 

Masters, Sr., Henry L North Texas 

Mate, William T. Minnesota 

Mathison,John Ed (J) Alabama-West Florida 

Matthews, Marcus (5) Baltimore-Washington 

Matthews, Eugene W. (10) Baltimore-Washington 

Matthis, Morris F. (4) Texas 

Mauney, Jimmy H. (3) Western North Carolina 

Maxwell, Cecil (9) East Ohio 

Mays, Joe W. (S) Mississippi 

Mays, Orville (5) Southern Illinois 

Mayfield, James Southwest Texas 

Mayo, Margaret J South Indiana 

Mayo,JerryH. (1) Tennessee 

Mays, Harriett A. South Carolina 

Mbembe.Rev. Central Zaire 

Mbukula, Koy (8) Central Zaire 

McAden, Robinson H. Virginia 

McAIilly, Stephen L (2) Mississippi 

McAIpin, Jackie L Northwest Texas 

McCabe, John S. (4) Northern Illinois 

McCall, Morris Texas 

McCallum, Marvin H. (ff) Detroit 

McCartney, William A East Ohio 

McCartt (34700,,) Holston 

McCauley, Ronald M (6) West Virginia 

McClain, George D New York 

McCleary, Renee L (10) Southern New Jersey 

McCleUan,JoEva(3) Kansas West 

McClendon, William T. (10) South Carolina 

McCleskey,J. Lawrence (10) Western North Carolina 

McClung, William L Virginia 

McCoy, Myron F. (J) Northern Illinois 

McCray, Holly S. (5) Oklahoma 

McCullough, June D. (5) Southern New Jersey 

McDonald, Steven C. Mississippi 

McDowell, Jr., Edward H. South Carolina 

McEntire, W. David Florida 

McGarvey, Gregory (7) South Indiana 

McGee, Elijah Tennessee 

McGuirt, Betty Moss B South Carolina 

McKain, Tom South Indiana 

McKeown, Leland P. (3) Florida 

McKinney.J. Eric (10) Central Texas 

McKonly, Melinda L (6) Eastern Pennsylvania 

McMahan, Dorothy S. (5) New England 

McReynolds, Russell F. (6) West Michigan 

Meador, Donald M. Texas 

Meadows, Pat North Alabama 

Means, Barbara L. (6) Texas 

Meeks, Donald L (10) Southern Illinois 

Meisel, Ulrich German East 

Mella, Frank Mindanao Philippines 

Mendenhall, Don W. (6) Iowa 

Mendillo, Benjamin G. Philippines 

Mendillo, Menre R. Philippines 

Mendonca, Benvinda (9) Eastern Angola 

Mercier, Anna M Western North Carolina 



Delegate Information 



25 



Merrick, Tracy (4) Western Pennsylvania 

Messer, Donald E. (4) Rocky Mountain 

Meuschke, Paul J. Western Pennsylvania 

Meyer, Margaret E. (10) Iowa 

Meyer, Mary Ellen (4) Missouri East 

Meyers, Robert C Oregon-Idaho 

Michailova, Mariella Bulgaria Provisional 

Michalski, Hans German North 

Mklat, Roberto Mindanao Philippines 

MiddletonJaneA. (5) New York 

Miesse, Helen West Ohio 

Miguel, Renato C. East Mindanao Philippines Prov. 

Miguel, Jose Mindanao Philippines 

Miguel, Romeo G Philippines 

Miguel, Samuel .... Visayas-North Mindanao Philippines 

Mikombe, Nseya Central Zaire 

Millan, Chita R Central Luzon 

Millan, Arsenio C Central Luzon 

Millard, M. Kent South Indiana 

Miller, Cindy Central Pennsylvania 

Miller, Maynard L (5) Minnesota 

Miller, Clayton Z. (10) New York 

Miller, Mary H. (4) South Indiana 

Miller, Patricia L (5) South Indiana 

Miller, Jack P. South Indiana 

Miller, L Thomas Virginia 

Miller. Sue Ellen West Ohio 

Miller, John D. (10) Western Pennsylvania 

Miller, Sarah S. (4) Wyoming 

Millikan, Charles R. Texas 

Mills, Carl L Holston 

Mills, Tom N. Northwest Texas 

Millsaps, Luther Mississippi 

Milton, Dorothy L Louisville 

Mims, L F. (Harry) (6) Western North Carolina 

Minor, Ute (7) German North 

Mitchell, Connie Kentucky 

Mitchell, Beth W. (9) Northern New Jersey 

Mitchell, Peter T South Carolina 

Mittelstadt, Holger German North 

Moe, Sharon L (10) Pacific Northwest 

Moffatt, Jessica F. Oklahoma 

Moffet, Gretta M Desert Southwest 

Mohr, Karsten W. German North 

Moma, Moma Wa (2) Southern Zaire 

Moman, Mary Ann South Indiana 

Moncure, Jr., Rhymes H. (6) Missouri East 

Mones, Johnson Middle Philippines 

Monteloyola, Renato P Philippines 

Montgomery, Darlene T. (1) Kansas East 

Montgomery, Pamela South Indiana 

Montgomery, Samuel (7) Texas 

Moon, Scott A Missouri East 

Mooneyhan, James B. (1) North Georgia 

Moore, Mary Elizabeth (10) California-Pacific 

Moore, Frances H. (3) North Alabama 

Moore, James W. (i) Texas 

Moore, Joy J. (10) West Michigan 

Moore, John E West Ohio 

Moorefield, Jr., Eugene Virginia 

Moorehead.J. Donald Memphis 

Moreno Rivas, Rafael Puerto Rico 

Morey, Janet C. Minnesota 

Morgan, T. Michael North Alabama 

Morgan, Willie E North Indiana 

Morgan, Sharie (10) North Indiana 

Morris, Sam Mississippi 

Morris, Carolyn W. (10) North Georgia 



Morris, Jim W. (2) Red Bird Missionary 

Morris, Patricia (3) Western Pennsylvania 

Morrison, Martha (Twick) (6) Mississippi 

Morrison, Susan (3) New England 

Mortel, Yolanda Palawan Provisional 

Mortel, Isidro Palawan Provisional 

Moss, Danny J. Oklahoma 

Mostoles, Rhodita M East Philippines 

Motombo, Ngoy North Shaba 

Mott, Stephen C. New England 

Moxley, Jody P. (5) Florida 

Moyer, Bonda D. (9) North Arkansas 

Mpiana, Makonga North Shaba 

Muchopa, Naboth (1) Great Britain 

Mueller, Michael Wisconsin 

Mukala, Musenge (10) North Shaba 

Mukazu, Mayonde Southern Zaire 

Mukenge, Liwa (10) Central Zaire 

MuUer, Marianne German North 

Mumba, Djamba (3) Central Zaire 

Munda, Ukunda (4) Northeast Zaire 

Munyangwe, Kabamba (7) North Shaba 

Munza, Kasongo (7) North Shaba 

Murphy, Jim Kentucky 

Murphy, Sandra L Southern New Jersey 

Murphy, Jr, E. Thomas (1) Virginia 

Mustonen, Antti R. Finland-Finnish Provisional 

Muthiah, Marion Dakotas 

Mwema, Kanonge North Shaba 

Myers, Mark C. (3) Southern Illinois 

Nabors, Jack M. Mississippi 

Nabua, Jaime F Central Luzon 

Nailor, Steven F Northern Illinois 

Nalbantski, Daniel Bulgaria Provisional 

Namoc, Nicholas B. .... East Mindanao Philippines Prov. 

Nato, Arnold Central Luzon 

Nausner, Helmut (10) Austria Provisional 

Nausner, Michael Sweden 

Navas, John M Western New York 

Nawej, SulA. (3) Southern Zaire 

Ndalamba, Ilunga North Shaba 

Neaves, Norman E. Oklahoma 

Nebran, Patrocinio O. . . . East Mindanao Philippines Prov. 

Neels,Jorg Egbert German East 

Neese, Betty (9) North Central New York 

Nelson, Betty J. (9) Kansas East 

Nesbitt, Quentin West Ohio 

Neto, Evalina J. Western Angola 

Newman, Jared A. (7) Rocky Mountain 

Newsome.JackL Central Illinois 

Newton, Douglas C. Alabama-West Florida 

Ngandu, Kasongo Central Zaire 

Ngeleka, Mpanga (4) North Shaba 

Ngoie Wa Kuvid, Monga North Shaba 

Ngoy, Kazadi (2) North Shaba 

Ngoy Kyungu, Matanga (5) North Shaba 

Nibbelink.Jim (5) West Ohio 

Nichols, Charlotte A Peninsula-Delaware 

Nicholson, Anne D. (5) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Nicholson, Charles W. Mississippi 

Nicodemus, Richard (2) New York 

Nicolas, Efi-aim Mindanao Philippines 

Nielsen, Grethe-Lis Denmark 

Nilo,JeremiasB. Central Luzon 

Nilo, Giovanni Montini S East Philippines 

Nixon, Harold D. (1) Northwest Texas 

Nkemba, Ndjungu (6) Southern Zaire 

Nkulu Ntanda, Ntambo (6) North Shaba 



26 



DCA Advance Edition 



Nolla, Jaime Wsconsin 

Nolle, Beverly M. (2) Iowa 

Norak.Andrus Estonia Provisional 

Nordhy, Lars Erik Norway 

Norris.J. Allen (7) North Carolina 

Norton, Richard (1) little Rock 

Norton, Wilbum (Bill) L North CaroUna 

Nshimpundu, Musonda Southern Zaire 

Ntambo, Mutwale Tanganyika 

Nual, Carmelina R. .... Yisayas-North Mindanao Phlpns 

Nugent, Jr., Randolph W. {2) New York 

Nunnelee, M. Diane Missouri West 

Nussbaumer Marc Switzerland-France 

Nutter.JudyA. (6) West Virginia 

Nutter, Randy P. (4) West Virginia 

O'Connor-Slater, Deborah L (8) . . North Central New York 

O'Dell, Paulette W. (.10) Uttle Rock 

OToole, Jr., Ed North Alabama 

Oakland, Barbara L Iowa 

Oakland, Jerry E. Iowa 

Ocampo, Generoso C. (6) Bulacan Philippines 

Oden.Tal (10) Oklahoma 

Odimba, Kalema (5) Central Zaire 

Odland.Tove Norway 

Oglesby, Anthony R. (1) South hidiana 

Okoko, Luhata Northeast Zaire 

Olds, J Howard Louisville 

Oleko, A. Nyembo Northeast Zaire 

Olin, Judith A East Ohio 

Oliphant, George Holston 

Olive, George E. (8) Northern New Jersey 

Oliveira, Costa (2) Eastern Angola 

Oliver, Mary Brown (9) Baltimore-Washington 

Oliver, Les North Arkansas 

Olpindo, Jonathan D. . Visayas-North Mindanao Philippines 

Olsen, Oystein Norway 

Ohon, Richard L Iowa 

Olson, Harrett Jane (5) Northern New Jersey 

Olson-Bunnell, Heather L North Indiana 

Ombaku, Onema (4) Central Zaire 

Orphe, Martha M. Western Pennsylvania 

Ortiz Vidal, Victor (4) Puerto Rico 

Osbom,JohnP. West Ohio 

Ott, Louise R. Detroit 

Ot^es, Jim H. (4) North Indiana 

Ough, Bruce R. (2) Iowa 

Outlaw, Frederick G. (5) Alabama-West Florida 

Outslay, Marilyn J. (6) Oregon-Idaho 

Owen-Bofferding, Sue J. (2) Oregon-Idaho 

Owens, Ray Central Illinois 

Pableo, Franelli C. East Mindanao Philippines Prov. 

Pablo, EliasF. Philippines 

Pace, Kimberly R (8) Mississippi 

Pacey, Stephen R. (5) Central Illinois 

Packer, Vera Louisiana 

Padilla,Romulo Bulacan Philippines 

Padua, Aida Mindanao Philippines 

Page, jr., Conrad M. (5) Central Pennsylvania 

Pague, linda Visayas-North Mindanao Phlpns 

Pague, Loreto Visayas-North Mindanao Phlpns 

Pajaro, Joaquina T Philippines 

Palafox, Benny C. Central Luzon 

Palafox, Nerissa S Central Luzon 

Palaganas, Leon L (4) Central Luzon 

Palik, Marija Macedonia-Yugoslavia Provisional 

Palik-Kuncak, Ana .... Macedonia-Yugoslavia Provisional 

Palmberg, Mervi Finland-Swedish Provisional 

Palmer, Gregory K (5) East Ohio 



Palmer, Ruth G. (10) Texas 

Panganiban, Marita Bulacan Philippines 

Panganiban, Rustico V. (5) East Philippines 

Paraso, Glen V East Philippines 

Park, Hankyu California-Nevada 

Park, Song Ja (3) California-Pacific 

Park, Young Ok {2) Northern Illinois 

Park, Jeremiah J. Northern New Jersey 

Park, Yoon S. (1) Virginia 

Parker, Joe (6) New England 

Parker, Richard S. (6) New York 

Parker, Nancy P South Georgia 

Parker, Sr., Robert L Oklahoma 

Parks, Lewis A (9) Central Pennsylvania 

Parks, Arnold G Missouri East 

Pamamets, Olav (7) Estonia Provisional 

Parris, Shirley (9) New York 

Parris,MarkD North Alabama 

Parsons, III, James N Texas 

Pascua, Lelita R Central Luzon 

Pascual, Crisolito S Philippines 

Pasley, B. J. (9) South Carolina 

Pastores, Nimfe Mindanao Philippines 

Patterson, Dottie Western Pennsylvania 

Pattugalan, Roland I East Philippines 

Paul, Doris B. (6) North Georgia 

Paulsmeyer, Jason A (1) Missouri East 

Paup, Edward W. {V3) Rocky Mountain 

Paustian, Donna CentralTexas 

Payne, lillie CentralTexas 

Peabody, Joe P. North Georgia 

Peak, Diane New England 

Pearce, Charles (1) Florida 

Peckham, Galen £. (4) Iowa 

Pedracio, Danilo T. East Philippines 

Peel, Dorothy (6) Memphis 

Peeples, William D. (1) Louisiana 

Pegalan, Mario Visayas-North Mindanao Phlpns 

Penalva, David E. South Indiana 

Penetrante, Apolinario Philippines 

Pennel,Jr.,JoeE. (9) Tennessee 

Pennell, James T. (4) South Georgia 

Peralta, Dominador M Central Luzon 

Percell,EmeryA (4) Northern Illinois 

Perry, Rubin (4) North Georgia 

Perry, James M. (2) Troy 

Peters, Rhoda A. (9) Louisville 

Peters, Frieda K. Oklahoma 

Peters, John B. Virginia 

Petrak, Ruth Anne Iowa 

Petreski, Kitan (3) .... Macedonia-Yugoslavia Provisional 

Pevahouse, Joe N Memphis 

Phillips,}. D. (6) CentralTexas 

Phillips, Cheryl (6) CentralTexas 

Phillips, J. Taylor (3) South Georgia 

Pickett, William A (4) Florida 

Pier-Fitzgerald, Lynn West Michigan 

Pierson, Robert D. (6) Oklahoma 

Pike, Don M (1) CentralTexas 

Pimentel, FeC. Southwest Philippines Provisional 

Pineda, Al (6) California-Pacific 

Pitney, Deborah G. (10) Oregon-Idaho 

Plowman, Jack W. (7) Western Pennsylvania 

Plummer, Sr., Kenneth H Central Pennsylvania 

Pokropp, Horst German Southwest 

Polk, Sherrie D Oklahoma 

Poll, Lothar Austria Provisional 

Ponder, Reginald W. North Carolina 



Delegate Information 



27 



Ponzani.Joe East Ohio 

Porquillo, Rogelio A East Mindanao Philippines Prov. 

Porter, James R. Central Texas 

Porter, John F Louisiana 

Porterfield, Charles W South Indiana 

Poto, Umembudi (6) Central Zaire 

Potter, Robert L. Louisiana 

Potter, Helen E. (4) West Ohio 

Potter-Miller, Jaime (7) Western Pennsylvania 

Potts, Bertha M (9) Oklahoma 

Powell, Robert L Alabama-West Florida 

Powell, Joseph C. Florida 

Powell, Ida B Virginia 

Powell, Sr., Larry P. (3) Desert Southwest 

Poy, Emundu (2) West Zaire 

Predas, Manuel E. Central Luzon 

Presnell, William M (9) North Carolina 

Price, Pearl L (9) Red Bird Missionary 

Pritts, Deborah L (10) North Central New York 

Prochazka, Pavel Czech and Slovak Republics 

Prochazkova, Miroslava .... Czech and Slovak Republics 

Prussner, Roberta Central Illinois 

Puno, Carlito S Philippines 

PupoOrtiz, Yolanda Baltimore-Washington 

Purushotham, Gwen New England 

Puslecki, Edward (6) Poland 

Putzke, lugeborg German North 

Pyron, Marvin R. Missouri East 

Queen, Dolores B. (10) Western North Carolina 

Quemado, Virginia P. . . . Visayas-North Mindanao Phlpns 

Quibonda, Francisco (9) Western Angola 

Quick, William K. (&) Detroit 

Quick, Jeff (4) North Arkansas 

Quilling, Debra A S. (8) South Carolina 

Quitlong, MarcelinaA. Central Luzon 

Radde, Henry W. {S) Central Texas 

Raguindin,JoseQ Central Luzon 

Rahuvarm, Andreas Estonia Provisional 

Rainier, Helen L. (2) Southern New Jersey 

Rainwater, Dorothy (5) Mississippi 

Rajamaa, Tapani J. (7) Finland-Finnish Provisional 

Rajamaa, Iris Ch. (8) Finland-Finnish Provisional 

Ramoran, Jaime C. East Mindanao Philippines Prov. 

Ramos, Libertino Bicol Philippines Provisional 

Ramos, Norberto M. Bulacan Philippines 

Ramos, Ernesto Mindanao Philippines 

Ramos, Imelda Visayas-North Mindanao Phlpns 

Ramos, Jr., Norberto S Bulacan Philippines 

Rankin, Donald E. Louisville 

Rankin, Nancy Burgin (8) Western North Carolina 

Rapisura, Manuel Mindanao Philippines 

Rasmussen,Jorgen Denmark 

Rathod. Samuel R. (10) Nebraska 

Ravenhorst, Dorothy A. (2) Virginia 

Read, Riley R Minnesota 

Readdean, Shirley E. (6) Troy 

Reasner, William S. (6) Southern New Jersey 

Redding, LaVada S. (6) Rocky Mountain 

Redmond, John A. South Carolina 

Reed,JamesR. (7) Kansas West 

Reed, Charlotte Nebraska 

Reese, William £>. (9) Missouri East 

Reeves, Sr., Richard E. (10) Central Illinois 

Regala, Riolito C Philippines 

Reich, Eldon Dakotas 

Reid, William C. (1) South Carolina 

Reid, William W. Wyoming 

Renders, Helmut German North 



Renfro, Mary W Southern Illinois 

Renshaw, Earl R. (9) Southern Illinois 

Reyes, Ruben T Philippines 

Reyes, Gilbert West Middle Philippines 

Reynolds, Cynthia (9) North Indiana 

Rhodes, Arnold A. (6) Western Pennsylvania 

Rhodes-Wickett, Sharon K. (10) California-Pacific 

Rhonemus, Alfred C. (1) West Ohio 

Ribe, Torbjom Norway 

Ricards, Betty P Southern New Jersey 

Rice, Mattie M. (6) Little Rock 

Richards, Alys P. (7) North Texas 

Richardson, David L. (2) California-Pacific 

Richardson, Emma M Oklahoma 

Richardson, Gerald (10) Western New York 

Rickardsson, Ulf Sweden 

Ricks, Christian T. (3) Missouri East 

Riddle, Barbara W. (10) Florida 

Ridenour, Don (3) Iowa 

Rieker, Wolfgang German South 

Riley, Jr., Henry E. Virginia 

Rinehart, Joetta F. (2) Western North Carolina 

Ripski, Mike Memphis 

Rish, Billy Joe Alabama-West Florida 

Riss. TimothyJ. New York 

Rivera, EliS.{T) New York 

Roberson, Joseph South Georgia 

Roberts, Henry E. Alabama-West Florida 

Roberts, Rodell F. (6) Florida 

Roberts, Sandra Kams New Mexico 

Roberts, Tibbie North Carolina 

Robertson, Eugene B. Central Texas 

Robertson, Suzi (2) Texas 

Robinson, Randall F. (4) Central Illinois 

Robinson, Bumham Central Texas 

Robinson, Emmadell Kansas West 

Robinson, George P. Western North Carolina 

Rochlitzer, Klaus German East 

Roder, Thomas German East 

Rodriguez, Erlincy €..... East Mindanao Philippines Prov. 

Rodriguez, Phyllis R. (4) Wisconsin 

Rogers, Lois North Indiana 

Rogers, Lois B Peninsula-Delaware 

Rogers, Sheila Z). (6) South Carolina 

Rojas, Marivic H. (1) Palawan Provisional 

Rollins, Benita (6) East Ohio 

Roman, David P Oklahoma 

Roper, Jocelyn M West Ohio 

Rosario, Virgilio S East Mindanao Philippines Prov. 

Rosas, Robert R. (9) Pacific Northwest 

Rose, Barbara J. (1) Kansas West 

Rosquita, Florencio East Mindanao Philippines Prov. 

Rosquita, Faustino (6) Visayas-North Mindanao Philippines 

Ross, Ernest (7) Baltimore-Washington 

Ross, Vance P. West Virginia 

Roughface, Thomas Oklahoma Indian Missionary 

Roughton, Philip //. (1) Florida 

Rouse, Jeanne North Carolina 

Rowlett.Jr, Peyton L Holston 

Ruach, Susan W.N. (10) South Indiana 

Rubemb, Nawej Southern Zaire 

Rubio, Fe East Philippines 

Ruckert, Harold German South 

Rudisill, Maria Jean West Ohio 

Ruedas, Prudencio .... Southwest Philippines Provisional 

Ruff, Jerry D. (8) Southern New Jersey 

Rufino, Isabelo Mindanao Philippines 

Ruggiero, John New York 



28 



DCA Advance Edition 



Ruhnow, Wol^ang German East 

Rumford, Steve L South Georgia 

Rttof, Klaus U. German South 

Rush, James H. (8) South Georgia 

Russel, Remedios Visayas-North Mindanao Phlpns 

Russell, Timothy A Central Texas 

Russell Jerald W. Holston 

Russell, Willard Peninsula-Delaware 

Ryon, Susan Iowa 

Sabado, Hilario East Philippines 

Sadio, Sydney S. Southern New Jersey 

Sadler, Herb (3) Alabama-West Florida 

Sadsad, Domingo Bulacan Philippines 

Sadsad, Catalina Bulacan Philippines 

Sager, Stan (5) New Mexico 

Sales, Esrom S Central Luzon 

Salley, James (1) South Carolina 

Salter, Diane Central Pennsylvania 

Salvador, Eduardo Philippines 

Salyer, Ronald (4) North Central New York 

Samson, Ramon Bulacan Philippines 

Samson, Jr., Gerardo R Bulacan Philippines 

Samuel, Kayombo (9) Southern Zaire 

Samuelson, David Texas 

Sanchez, Federico A East Mindanao Philippines Prov. 

Sanchez, Jorge E. Northern New Jersey 

Sanden,Hilde Norway 

Sands, Judith CentralTexas 

Sansano, David Philippines 

Sarangaya, Ismael M. Bulacan Philippines 

Sarazin, Duane K (3) Minnesota 

Saunkeah, Ann (5) Oklahoma Indian Missionary 

Scavuzzo,DavidJ. East Ohio 

Schaarschmidt, Christian German Southwest 

Schall, Dan Western Pennsylvania 

Schauermann, Henrik Hungary Provisional 

Scheer, Dennis H. (2) Kansas West 

Schempp, Ulrich German North 

Schenck, Carl L (5) Missouri East 

Schert, Siegfried German South 

Schieck, Lothar German East 

Schlagenhauf, Karin German South 

Schlicher, Nancy L West Ohio 

Schmdz, Werner German South 

Schmdz, Rainer German South 

Schnase, Robert Southwest Texas 

Schock, Louise K (10) Northwest Texas 

Schoeffler, Sarah Louisiana 

Schreiber, Gerhard German Southwest 

Schwab, Penney (6) Kansas West 

Schwab, Sharon L Western Pennsylvania 

Scott, Zane (8) Holston 

Scott, Jack J Louisville 

Scott, Ralph L Missouri West 

Scott, Donald L Oklahoma 

Scott, Gail F. (3) Wyoming 

Scott III, William D. (1) Mississippi 

Seamands, David (1) Kentucky 

Segrest, Dale (7) Alabama-West Florida 

Seifert, Lois C Califomia-PacLSc 

Self, Eddie (5) North Alabama 

Selle, Man/red German North 

Selleck, Richard A West Michigan 

Selman, Scott North Alabama 

Sendwe, Ilunga (7) West Zaire 

Serafica, Eugene Palawan Provisional 

Sessions, Jeff B. (7) Alabama-West Florida 

Sessums, T. Terrell (7) Florida 



Severance, Robert J. (8) Kansas West 

Severe, David L. (5) Oklahoma 

Sewell, Peggy 1. (3) Rocky Mountain 

Seymour, James T. (1) Peninsuk-Delaware 

Seymour, Jr., Joseph (Jody) C. . . . . Western North Carolina 

Shamana, Beverly J. (6) California-Pacific 

Shank, Donald R. East Ohio 

Sharp, Christie C. (6) Desert Southwest 

Sharpe, Susan Af. (2) Memphis 

Shaw, Bobbye R. Northwest Texas 

Shaw, Jr., Caswell E. (2) North Carolina 

Sheaffer, Lee B. (4) Virginia 

Sheets, Herchel S. (9) North Georgia 

Sheldon, Barbara P Kansas West 

Sheldon, Frank E West Michigan 

Shelly, GussJ Mississippi 

Shelton 111, Henry C Memphis 

Shepherd,Jim (8) Kentucky 

Shepherd, Robert E Western North Carolina 

Sherbrooke, Sue Pacific Northwest 

Sherrer, John Alabama-West Florida 

Sherrill, Katherine C. Western North Carolina 

Shervanick, Nancy L Southern New Jersey 

Shettle.JohnT. (2) North Indiana 

Shingler, Sara S. (6) South Carolina 

Shivers, Constance A. (1) Southern New Jersey 

Short, Riley P. (5) Horida 

Shufflebarger, Emmett G Holston 

Shuler. Albert (6) North Carolina 

Siaba, Judith E. (2) Northern Illinois 

Siegrist, Roland (6) Austria Provisional 

Sieweck, Kriemhild German North 

Sigmon, Thomas R. Western North Carolina 

Sikes, Scott (7) Holston 

Sikes, Marget H North Georgia 

Silva, Mary (6) Rio Grande 

Simmons, Charles B. (10) Louisiana 

Simmons, Angelin J (7) South Carolina 

Simmons, Jennifer J West Virginia 

Simon, John P. Florida 

Sims, Jeanne' Southern Illinois 

Sims, Margaret Texas 

Sineath, Charles A North Georgia 

Sitts, Jeff (4) Minnesota 

Sizemore, James A. Virginia 

Skeen, W.M. 'BiU' (9) Holston 

Skelley-Watts,JoanE. (8) East Ohio 

Skinner, James G. (4) East Ohio 

Skoldh Jonsson, Ulla Sweden 

Slaughter, Michael B. (3) West Ohio 

Sleeth, James R. West Virginia 

Smalley, Susan (6) Alaska Missionary 

Smith, Louise Baltimore-Washington 

Smith, Patti M Baltimore-Washington 

Smith, Robert California-Pacific 

Smith, Hiram (10) Central Texas 

Smith, Alice I Florida 

Smith, Tompsie K. (5) Iowa 

Smith, Sandy Little Rock 

Smith, Carol A. (8) Missouri East 

Smith, Rodney New Mexico 

Smith, Bucky North Georgia 

Smith, Scott North Texas 

Smith, Jim W. (6) Northwest Texas 

Smith, Nolan Rocky Mountain 

Smith, Jerry J (4) Southwest Texas 

Smith, Randy (3) Texas 

Smith, Sandra W. Texas 



Delegate Information 



29 



Smith, David H. Virginia 

Smith. Theodore (5) Virginia 

Smith, Velma Wisconsin 

Snider, Mariin L Central Pennsylvania 

Snyder, Clyde A Central Illinois 

Snyder, Herbert}. Eastern Pennsylvania 

Soderstrom, Marcus (6) . . . . Finland-Swedish Provisional 

Soderstrom, Gosta Finland-Swedish Provisional 

Sololo, Nduu Southern Zaire 

Sorensen, Ove S. Denmark 

Soriano, Leo Mindanao Philippines 

Soriano, Dania Mindanao Philippines 

Sowards, Charlotte M. (6) Louisville 

Sowers, Gary D. (1) Central Pennsylvania 

Sowers, Geoffrey L Eastern Pennsylvania 

Spachman, Amy L. (7) West Michigan 

Sparkman, Jr., Robert H. North Alabama 

Speck, Heinz German South 

Spelman, Jeffrey R Northern New Jersey 

Spence, Elizabeth Lopez New Mexico 

Spence, Dennis North Arkansas 

Spencer, Sharon R Central Pennsylvania 

Spencer, Beverly J. (6) Iowa 

Spencer, Eugene P West Virginia 

Spinti, Robert J Wisconsin 

Sprague, Mary B West Michigan 

Sprague. C. Joseph (5) West Ohio 

Spranger, Friedrich German East 

Springer, Joann L Florida 

SL Clair, Liz (5) Peninsula-Delaware 

Stabler, Monty (9) North Alabama 

Stadler, Jr., Leonard E. Western North Carolina 

Stahl, Reiner German South 

Stambach, Paul E Central Pennsylvania 

Standiford, James W. (10) Desert Southwest 

Stanfield, Clyde New Mexico 

Stanley, David Iowa 

Stanovsky, Elaine J. W. (S) Pacific Northwest 

Stanton, Harold (4) Detroit 

Stames, Paul M Holston 

Stedman, Cathy N (2) Central Illinois 

Steeger, Hans-Albert German North 

Steele, Rodney G North Arkansas 

Stegall, Karl K. (A) Alabama-West Florida 

Stein, Hans-Ulrich German North 

Stein, Neil L Missouri East 

Steinert, Ruthild German North 

Stengel, Cathy Hall Western New York 

Stephenson, Janet E. (7) Iowa 

Stephenson, Roy (9) Memphis 

Stevens, Garrie F. North Central New York 

Stevens, Robert W. (4) Pacific Northwest 

Stewart, E. Allen Baltimore- Washington 

Stewart Carl E. (8) Louisiana 

Stewart, Mollie M. (4) North Alabama 

Stewart, Jr., Donalds. (8) Baltimore- Washington 

Still, Billy (3) Alaska Missionary 

Stilwell, Robert £. (3) South Carolina 

Stith in, Frank A Western North Carolina 

Stokes, Nancy D Desert Southwest 

Stone, Ruth Ellen North Indiana 

Stoneking, John D Kansas East 

Stookey, Laurence H. Peninsula-Delaware 

Story, Bettie W. (6) Central Illinois 

Stout, David B. (10) Iowa 

Stover, Gregory £>. (3) West Ohio 

Strait, Nancy Rocky Mountain 

Strait, Goerge E. South Carolina 



Straka, Gabriel German North 

Streetman, Charles (Bud) E Western North Carolina 

Streiff, Fritz East Ohio 

Streiff, Patrick Ph. {2) Switzerland-France 

Strickland, Don (5) Texas 

Sfroman, Pat (7) Central Texas 

Stultz, Valerie W (3) East Ohio 

Stutes, Robert G Texas 

Sublette, Jean S. (6) Alabama-West Florida 

Suits, L. David Troy 

Summers, Jr., Vance West Ohio 

Summers, Jr., Kenneth T Wyoming 

Summerville, Margaret (2) Baltimore-Washington 

Susag, Philip New England 

Suzuki, Betty (6) California-Nevada 

Swanson, James E. (1) South Georgia 

Sweet, Elizabeth A. (6) New England 

Sweet, Robert New England 

Swiggett, Ernest L (4) New York 

Swisher, Ronald E. (9) California-Nevada 

Sykes, Roslyn K. (7) Missouri East 

Tabbert, Russell Florida 

Takoy, Onalunge Central Zaire 

Talbott, Bert South Indiana 

Talley, Kathryn F. Virginia 

Tamang, Evelina Bulacan Philippines 

Tamayo, Qualita Palawan Provisional 

Tan, Wee-Li (10) New England 

Tangonan, Lito C. East Philippines 

Tanksley, Lem A. Tennessee 

Tapia, Elizabeth S. Bulacan Philippines 

Tappan, Marion East Ohio 

Tatem, Dorothy W. Eastern Pennsylvania 

Taylor, Mary Virginia (1) Holston 

Taylor, Lois New England 

Taylor, Wesley D Oregon-Idaho 

Teano, Veronica C Philippines 

Terrell, Charles Mississippi 

Tews, Jane A. (1) Desert Southwest 

Thai, Josef Czech and Slovak Republics 

Tharpe, Nina S Western North Carolina 

Theysohn, Reinhard German North 

Thielking, William B. (3) Southern New Jersey 

Thomas, Daniel M Mississippi 

nomas, David W. Oklahoma 

Thomas, John J. (9) South Indiana 

Thomas, Clara E Southern New Jersey 

Thompson, Janelle A. Detroit 

Thompson, Marjorie H. (6) Minnesota 

Thompson, James N. (4) North Georgia 

Thompson, George E. Western North Carolina 

Thompson, Odell (6) Wisconsin 

Thomburg, John D North Texas 

Tibalbag, Roy Visayas-North Mindanao Phlpns 

Tibbits, Lewis (1) Detroit 

Tichenor, Lisa W North Texas 

Tindall, Mary C Mississippi 

Tinoco,DavidA. (9) California-Pacific 

Titus, Phylemon Z). (3) Detroit 

Todd, Steve Nebraska 

Tomlinson, K. Edward North Georgia 

Tonkel, D. Keith Mississippi 

Topolewski, John L (10) Wyoming 

Toquero, Solito K. Bulacan Philippines 

Torres, Ulises New England 

Torres, Presentacion J Philippines 

Toschak, Patricia Morton (8) Minnesota 

Trajkovski, Boris (1) Macedonia-Yugoslavia Prov. 



30 



DCA Advance Edition 



Traver, Melissa S South Georgia 

Trevino-Teddlie, Jeannie (4) Central Texas 

Trigg, 0. Gerald Rocky Mountain 

Trotter, Mark C. (3) California-Pacific 

Trotter, Jr., Franks. (4) Baltimore-Washington 

Trumble, BetteT. (5) Nebraska 

Tserenkov, Juri Estonia Provisional 

Tshilombo.Rev Central Zaire 

Tubach, Jerry A. (4) Kansas East 

Tucker, Mary Frances (6) Holston 

Tucker, A. Arthur West Virginia 

Tullhage, Leif Sweden 

Turhyfill, Margaret A Virginia 

Turkington, Will Kentucky 

Turner, Richard D. (6) Nebraska 

Turner-Lacy. Nathaniel L. (9) West Virginia 

TuttleJoellynW North Central New York 

Twigg, Aimee W. (9) Western Pennsylvania 

Twite Kanonge, Ngoy North Shaba 

Tyler, Ann (10) Western North Carolina 

Uhlmann, Herbert German East 

Ullo, Arsenic East Philippines 

Ulmer, Susan South Carolina 

Umembudi, Akasa (7) Central Zaire 

Undo, Yemba (6) Northeast Zaire 

Underwood, Donald W. {4) North Texas 

Underwood, Cecil H West Virginia 

Urbom, Warren (7) Nebraska 

Valderama, Noe C. .... Visayas-North Mindanao Phlpns 
Valderama, Mamita C. . . Visayas-North Mindanao Phlpns 

VanDussen, D. Gregory Western New York 

Van Stone, Jack (2) South Indiana 

Vanzant, Lucille V. (2) Oklahoma 

Vaughn, Carole Virginia 

Vazquez-Garza, Virgilio Southwest Texas 

Velasco, Rolando C. Bulacan Philippines 

Velez, Miguel A. (6) Puerto Rico 

Vengco, Nonato U. Philippines 

Vesen, Peter German Southwest 

Vetter, Jeremy (1) Nebraska 

Vidal, R. Kathleen S Central Luzon 

Viduya, Trinidad Southwest Philippines Provisional 

Vigneaux, Randy W Missouri West 

Villa, Samuel B. Philippines 

Villalon, Marie-Sol S. . . Southwest Philippines Provisional 
Villalon,Jr,AnicetoR. (1) ... Southwest Philippines Prov. 

Villamayor, Aurora A. East Philippines 

Villamin,LilyM. California-Pacific 

Villanueva, Lima Mindanao Philippines 

Villanueva, Myma G. . . . Visayas-North Mindanao Phlpns 

Vineyard, George D Western New York 

Vinluan, Victor C. Central Luzon 

Vinte e Cinco, Gabriel Western Angola 

Vogel,UndaJ Iowa 

Vogt.JeroldW. (10) Kansas West 

Voigt, Karl Heinz German North 

Vose, Marvin R. Rocky Mountain 

Vun Cannon, L. Lewis (8) Western North Carolina 

Wagner, Ray (7) Dakotas 

Waitzmann, Ludwig German South 

Walden, Thomas L North Carolina 

Walker, Robin A. Kansas West 

Walker, Beverly J Oregon-Idaho 

Walker, Dorothy (9) Western Pennsylvania 

Walker, Jr., Robert C. (3) West Ohio 

Walker, Sr., Robert C West Ohio 

Walkup, Vincent Tennessee 

Wall, James Randy North Carolina 



Wallace, Davids. North Alabama 

Waller, L. Glenn Missouri West 

Walu, Onema Central Zaire 

Wangawang, Noemi Mindanao Philippines 

Ward, Robert B. Iowa 

Ward, Martha Z). (3) Iowa 

Ward, GaryT. (4) North Alabama 

Ward, Hope M. North Carolina 

Warfield,Jr., Stanley M. Oklahoma 

Washington, Rosa California-Nevada 

Washington, Stanley (3) East Ohio 

Wata, Kongolo (9) North Shaba 

Waters, Carolyn Nebraska 

Waters, Dale C. (3) West Virginia 

Watkins, Bradley F. (T) Central Illinois 

Watkins, Richard West Ohio 

Watson, B. Michael (10) Alabama-West Florida 

Watson, Tom (8) Nebraska 

Watt, Sharon M (6) Texas 

Waugh, James E. (8) West Ohio 

Waymire, Mona Mae (4) Oklahoma 

Weatherall, Sylvester Southern Illinois 

Weatherspoon, Dale (1) California-Nevada 

Weaver, Michael (6) Virginia 

Weaver, Peter D. (5) Western Pennsylvania 

Webb, Nancy J. Baltimore-Washington 

Webb, Thomas C. (1) Central Pennsylvania 

Webb, Jason Iowa 

Webb, Marilyn F. North Arkansas 

Webb, Arthur A. Northern Illinois 

Webb, Foye W Virginia 

Webster, David M. Missouri East 

Weeks, Patricia M North Indiana 

Weems, Stanley North Alabama 

Weems,Jr,LovettH. (4) Missouri West 

Wegelius, Fredrik (5) Finland-Swedish Provisional 

Weibbach, Christian German East 

Weigle, Jennifer Central Pennsylvania 

Weinberg, Nancy L Florida 

Welti, Erika Switzerland-France 

Wembo, Lushima Northeast Zaire 

Wembo, Mundeke Northeast Zaire 

Wembudinga, Gilbert U. (6) Upper Zaire 

Wende, Stephen P. (2) Southwest Texas 

Wendel, Jorunn Norway 

Wendland, Barbara (5) Central Texas 

Wenner, Rosemarie German Southwest 

Werlein,Jr.,Ewing (4) Texas 

West, Maria J Kansas West 

West, Brenda G. (T) Missouri West 

West,Jr,J. Pete (,9) NorthAlabama 

Westad, Ola Norway 

Westby, Jeremy Minnesota 

Westmoreland, Mark A North Georgia 

Weston, Jr., Charles H West Ohio 

Wetzel, Nancy D Louisville 

Wheatley, Dossie F. (8) Memphis 

Whitaker, Keith C. Texas 

Whitaker, Timothy W. Virginia 

White, RaymonE. Holston 

White, George A Iowa 

White, Paul D. (5) Louisiana 

White, Sara A South Carolina 

White, David L (6) South Indiana 

White, Chris (1) Western Pennsylvania 

White, William F Wisconsin 

White, Wesley J Wisconsin 

White, Jr., Charles (Denny) D. (4) . Western North Carolina 



Delegate Information 



31 



Whitehurst, Betty C. (6) Virginia 

Whitehurst, Walter A Virginia 

Whiteside, Robert E. (2) Mississippi 

Whitfield, D. Max (6) North Arkansas 

Whitlow, Mark (4) Memphis 

Whittemore, Joe M. (5) North Georgia 

Whittle, Charles Z). (3) Northwest Texas 

Wiberg, Linda (3) California-Nevada 

Wiborg, Margaret New England 

Wier, Delight B. (1) Central Illinois 

Wigel, Betty L (2) West Virginia 

Wiggans, Barbara T North Texas 

Wilcock, Deborah M. (3) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Wilcox, Timothy D Iowa 

Wilder, GamettM. (10) North Georgia 

Wiley, RebaD Alabama-West Florida 

Wilkes, Talmadge J South Georgia 

Wilkinson, Larry Z). (4) Western North Carolina 

Willey, Larry G Iowa 

Williams, Edna Alabama-West Florida 

Williams, John H. Baltimore- Washington 

Williams, Scott A. Central Pennsylvania 

Williams, Marie P. Louisiana 

Williams, Aileen L (3) Minnesota 

Williams, Jerry R Missouri East 

Williams, Idalene Nebraska 

Williams, Wesley (1) New England 

Williams, Raymond (8) North Texas 

Williams, Margaret A. (6) Northern Illinois 

Williams, Tullalah F. (9) Northern Olinois 

Williams, Danny South Carolina 

Williams, Joe (4) Tennessee 

Williams, Donald (8) West Michigan 

Williams, Jr., Jacob C. (7) North Indiana 

Williamson, Richard 'Dick' North Georgia 

Willimon, William H. (2) South Carolina 

Wills, Jr, Richard J. (3) Florida 

Willson, June B South Carolina 

Wilson, J. LaVon (7) Central Illinois 

Wilson, Peary Dakotas 

Wilson, David B. (5) UttleRock 

Wilson, James M. Northern Illinois 

Wilson, L Cean (7) West Ohio 

Wilson, Jr., Earl iX) Western North Carolina 

Wilson-Parsons, Mary Jane South Georgia 

Wiltse, David A. West Michigan 

Windham, Jr., James C Western North Carolina 

Winkmann, Gunter German Southwest 

Winston, Joseph M. (2) Wisconsin 

Witman,Jan S Yellowstone 

Witwer, Brian (5) North Indiana 

Witzig, Hartmut German South 

Wogaman, J Philip (3) Baltimore-Washington 

Wolf, Rexford Virginia 

Wolfe, Thomas V. (7) North Central New York 

Wolring, Elsbeth German North 



Womeldorff, Porter J. (9) Central Illinois 

Wood, Arlene Alaska Missionary 

Wood, Anita West Ohio 

Woodruff, John H. Central Illinois 

Woods, Margie McDaniel Missouri East 

Woods, Vicki (10) New England 

Woods, Carol North Texas 

Woodward, Sewell Kentucky 

Woolridge, Jr., Eugene R. (10) Virginia 

Workman, Anna G. (5) North Carolina 

Wright, Richard S. (1) Alabama-West Florida 

Wright, Peggy J Northwest Texas 

Wright, Juanita B. (6) Tennessee 

Wright, Elizabeth A. 8.(1) Virginia 

Wright, Richard L. (7) West Virginia 

Wright, Betty (2) Western New York 

Wright, Jr., WasenaF. Virginia 

Wrisley, Norton (Bud) California-Pacific 

Wuchterl, Rudolf German South 

Wyatt, Mary New England 

Wynn, Samuel (5) North Carolina 

Wynne, Margaret Little Rock 

Xavier, Geraldo Eastern Angola 

Yamamoto, Dean S. H. Oregon-Idaho 

Yannayon, Harold (2) Western Pennsylvania 

Yasay, Wilfredo A Southwest Philippines Prov. 

Yav,Nzam Southern Zaire 

Yav, Ditend Southern Zaire 

Yebuah, Lisa (8) South Carolina 

Yeoh, Jenni M. (6) Pacific Northwest 

Ygar, Teresita A. (4) Southwest Philippines Prov. 

Yohan, Shantilata R. F. (6) North Georgia 

Yoost, Charles D. (10) East Ohio 

Yoost, Timothy (1) East Ohio 

York, Billy L (10) North Alabama 

Yost, James Florida 

Yost, Lois A. Florida 

Young, Jean S Baltimore-Washington 

Young, T. Michael (2) Central Texas 

Young, Betty J. Northern New Jersey 

Young, Carl W. (3) Oklahoma 

Young, C. Garland Western North Carolina 

Young, Jack (8) Western North Carolina 

Youngblood, Ed Mississippi 

Youngblood, Rebecca C (6) Mississippi 

Yrigoyen, Charles (,8) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Yuhe, Mbundja Upper Zaire 

Zagray, Allan H. East Ohio 

Zeiders, G. Edwin (10) Central Pennsylvania 

Zimmerli, Mary Jo Baltimore-Washington 

Zimmerman, Emily Ann (9) Florida 

Zimmerman, Marti Rocky Mountain 

Zombil, Mwez (8) Southern Zaire 

Zucker, Walter German Southwest 

Zumo, Afonso (2) Western Angola 



32 



DCA Advance Edition 



Voting and Reserve Delegates 
to the 1996 General Conference 
ofThe United Methodist Church 



In parentheses following the name of the annual conference or concordat church is the number of persons in the 

delegation. Voting delegates are listed in lay and ministerial groups in order of election with choice of legislative 

committee indicated in parenthesis. Reserves are those elected in accordance with ^ 37 of the Constitution. 



Alabama-West Florida (14) 

Sec. D Row 5 Seats 1-7 
Row 6 Seats 1-7 

Segrest, Dale (7), circuit judge; 501 Lilly Avenue, Tallassee, 

AL 36078 
Henderson, Curtis J. (3), CCOM associate director; 6207 

Sarah Drive, Pensacola, FL 32503 
Keck, Duane J. (10), retired; 505 Amelia Street, FL Walton 

Beach, FL 32547 
Lehman, Donald A. (1), retired; 2245 McCutchen Place, 

Pensacola, FL 32503 
Sublette, Jean S. (6), retired teacher; 135 Hillcrest Drive, 

Titus, AL 36080 
Brown, Ruth S. (8), executive director; 512 Florence Street, 

Dothan,AL 36301 
Sessions, Jeff B. (7), Alabama Attorney General; 16 South 

Lafayett Street, Mobile, AL 36604 
*Stegall, Karl K. (4) , pastor; 2416 West Cloverdale Park, 

Montgomery, AL 36106 
Mathisonjohn Ed (7), pastor; 6000 Atlanta Highway, 

Montgomery, AL 36117 
Sadler, Herb (3), pastor; P.O. Box 338, Gulf Breeze, FL 

32562 
Wright, Richard S. (1) , district superintendent; 3005 Watson 

Drive, Marianna, FL 32446 
Watson, B. Michael (10), pastor; P.O. Box 6845, Mobile, AL 

36660-0845 
Ellisor,/. Walter (9), district superintendent; 1924 Reeves 

Street, S-232, Dothan, AL 36303 
Outlaw, Frederick G. (5), pastor; P.O. Box 1351, Tuskegee 

Institute, AL 36087 

Reserves 

BuIIard, Mary Ellen, retired; 3359 Warrenton Road, 

Montgomery, AL 36111 
Rish. Billy Joe, attorney; P.O. Box 39, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 
Sherrer, John, corporation vice-president; 137 Satterfield, 

Selma,AL 36701 
Williams, Edna, library director; 2801 Bulls Avenue, 

Tuskegee Instihite, AL 36088 
Holston, Charles A, retired management counsultant; 106 

Natchez Drive, Montgomery, AL 36117 
Goodwin, Tom P., retired; 621 Merioneth Drive, FL Walton 

Beach, FL 32547 
Powell, Robert L., businessman; 7583 South Park, Dothan, 

AL 36301 
Newton, Douglas C, district superintendent; P.O. Box 2044, 

Selma.AL 36702 
Wiley, Reba D., pastor; P.O. Box 65, Silas, AL 36919 
Garrison, Langdon H., district superintendent; P.O. Box 

2727, Pensacola, FL 32513 
Chandler,;. Edward, pastor; P.O. Box 278, Niceville, FL 

32588 



Dooling, Jerry M., pastor; 1380 West Main Street, Dothan, 

AL 36301 
Boozer, Asa, district superintendent; P.O. Box 6128, 

Montgomery, AL 36106 
Roberts, Henry E., pastor; 6 East Wright StreeL Pensacola, 

FL 32501 

Alaska Missionary (2) 

Sec. B Row 10 Seats 10-11 

Smalley, Susan (6), teacher; 105 Linwood, Kenai, AK 99611 
* Still, Billy (3), superintendent; 3402 Wesleyan Drive, 
Anchorage, AK 99508 

Reserves 

Wood, Arlene, school food services; 3416 West 83rd, 

Anchorage, AK 99502-4435 
Fellers, Jim, pastor; 1801 0'Malley Road, Anchorage, AK 

99516-1372 

Austria Provisional (2) 

Sec. B Row 12 Seats 7-8 

SiegrisL Roland (6), administrator; A-4020 linz, Figulystr. 

32, Austria 
*Nausner, Helmut (10), pastor; A-llOO Wien, Landgutgasse 

39/8, Austria 

Reserves 

Fux, Gottfried, manager; A-4030 Linz, Willingerstrabe 21, 

Austria 
Poll, Lothar, pastor; A-4020 Linz, Wienerstrabe 260a, Austria 

Baltimore-Washington (20) 

Sec. A Row 9 Seats 1-10 
Row 10 Seats 1-10 

Ferguson, Sandra (5), associate council director; 5124 

Greenwich Avenue, Baltimore, MD 21229-2393 
Butier, Phyllis (8), homemaker; Route 6, Box 130, 

Martinsburg WV 25401-9239 
Keels, Christine (6), probation officer supervisor; 20 

Millstone Road, Randallstown, MD 21133-1519 
Beisner, Judith (3), homemaker; 11904Tildenwood Drive, 

RockviUe, MD 20852-4300 
DuVall, George (9), retired; 5129 - 12th Street, NE, 

Washington DC 20011-6411 
Leatherman, Sharon (4), Appalachian ministries; 16125 

Cloverton Lane, Williamsport, MD 21795-1134 
Clark, Dorothy Davis (10), diaconal minister; 302 Slitting 

Mill Place, Catonsville, MD 21228-2432 
Baldridge, Mary (1), retired; 716 Matawa Court, 

Millersville, MD 21108-2133 



Delegate Information 



33 



Ross, Ernest (7), retired; 534 Pinedale Drive, Annapolis, 

MD 21401-6817 
Summerville, Margaret (2), retired; 3208 Yosemite Avenue, 

Baltimore, MD 21215-7513 
*Keels, Bernard 'Skip' (6), district superintendent; 20 

Millstone Road, Randallstown, MD 21133-1519 
Matthews, Marcus (5), council director; 5124 Greenwich 

Avenue, Baltimore, MD 21229-2393 
Matthews. Eugene W. (10), pastor; 1709 Verbena Street, 

NW, Washington DC 20012-1048 
WogamanJ. Philip (3), pastor; 4620 - 45th Street, NW, 

Washington DC 200164479 
Chattin, Terri Rae (1), pastor; 70 Church Road, Arnold, MD 

21012-2314 
Johnson, Peggy Ann (2), pastor; 5606 Johnnycake Road, 

Baltimore, MD 21207-4743 
Trotter, Jr Frank (E.) (4), pastor, 16 Carissa Court, Owings 

Mills MD 21117-1312 
Oliver, Mary Brown (9), district superintendent; 1710 

Vamum Street, NW, Washington DC 20011-4208 
Stewart, Jr. Donald S. (8), district superintendent, 6104 

Winnebago Road, Bethesda MD 20816-3142 
Holmes, William A. (7), pastor; 3311 Nebraska Avenue, 

NW, Washington DC,20016-2706 

Reserves 

Flinn, Jr. Thomas W.; sales manager, 3606 MacAlpine Road, 

Ellicott City MD 21042-5203 
Barton, Patsy, retired; 5412 Old Crain Highway, Upper 

Marlboro, MD 20772-3021 
Giles, Ruth L, retired; 1409 Peaceful Lane, Silver Spring, 

MD 20904-1537 
Smith, Louise, retired; 4730 Duncannon Road, Pikesville, 

MD 21208-2045 
Gause, Carolyn, retired; 129 Warwick Drive, Lutherville, 

MD 21093-5424 
Hirata, Richard, surgeon; 11703 Fallswood Terrace, 

Lutherville, MD 21093-1709 
Jones, Everett, retired; 3735 Kemptown Church Road, 

Monrovia, MD 21770^701 
Brito, Ana, retired; 18306 Hallmark Court, Gaithersburg, 

MD 2087M672 
Hardinger, Adam, student; 1911 Frederick Street, 

Cumberland, MD 21502-1041 
Smith, Patti M., diaconal minister; 1052 Upnor Road, 

Baltimore, MD 21212-4020 
Stewart, E. Allen, district superintendent; 2501 

Heatherwood Court, Alephi, MD 20783 
Brought, Byron P., pastor; 1910 Dulany Place, Annapolis, 

MD 21401-6221 
Argo, A David, pastor; 4526 - 44th Street, NW, Washington 

DC 20016 
Albury, Kay F., pastor; 5900 Loch Raven Boulevard, 

Baltimore, MD 21239-2440 
Brunkow, Thomas L, pastor; 5201 Worthington Drive, 

Bethesda, MD 20816 
Pupo^rtiz, Yolanda, General Secretary General 

Commission on Religion and Race; 18 Landsend Drive, 

Gaithersburg, MD 20878-1987 
Webb, Nancy J., pastor; 2428 Brambleton Road, Baltimore, 

MD 2120^345 
Williams, John H., district superintendent; 10733 Van Lear 

Drive, Williamsport, MD 21795-1423 
Young, Jean S., pastor; 16501 Alden Avenue, Gaithersburg, 

MD 20877-1505 
Zimmerli, Mary Jo, district superintendent; 119 Charmuth 

Road, LutherviUe, MD 21093-5210 



Bicol Philippines Provisional (2) 

Sec. B Row 11 Seats 8-9 

Lorico, Samuel J. (1), employee; Camaligan United 

Methodist Church, Sn. Mateo, Camaligan Cam. 

Sur,Philippines 
*Lucena, Harvey M. (6), district superintendent; Legaspi 

United Methodist Church, Balintawak Street, Old Albay 

Legaspi City,Philippines 

Reserves 

Ramos, Libertino, fiscal; St. Luke United Methodist 

CHurch, 2450 Vmzon Avenue, Daet Cam. 

Norte,Philippines 
Declaro, Rhoda, employee; First United Methodist Church, 

157 Bagumbayan Norte, Naga City Philippines 
Letana, Reynaldo F., district superintendent; St. Luke 

United Methodist Church, 2450 Vinzon Avenue, Daet 

Cam. Norte,Philippines 
Alvarez, Maximo C; First United Methodist Church, 157 

Bagumbayan Norte, Naga City Philippines 

Bulacan Philippines (2) 

Sec. B Row 3 Seats 11-12 

Capistrano, Melanio R. (1), lawyer; Quibadia, Obando, 

Bulacan Philippines 
*Ocampo, Generoso C. (6), district superintendent; Liang, 

Malolos, Bulacan Philippines 

Reserves 

Aniag, Pacifico E., businessman; Atlag, Malolos, Bulacan 

Philippines 
Capistrano, Eliseo, businessman; Quibadia, Obando, 

Bulacan Philippines 
Samson, Jr. Gerardo (R.), businessman. Rev. Augustin 

Samson Memorial United Methodist Church, Calizon 

Calumpit, Bulacan,Philippines 
Samson, Ramon, lawyer; Rev. Augustin Samson Memorial 

United Methodist Church, Calizon, Calumpit 

Bulacan,Philippines 
Ramos, Jr. Norberto S.; engineer, Liang, Malolos Bulacan, 

Philippines 
Sadsad, Catalina, businesswoman; Central United 

Methodist Church, Sta. Maria, Bulacan Philippines 
Manabat, Cristina N., college faculty; Harris Memorial 

College, Dolores, Taytay Ri2al,Philippines 
Tamang, Evelina, administrator; Bulacan Ecumenical 

School, Liang, Malolos Bulacan,Philippines 
Panganiban, Marita, office worker; The United Methodist 

Church, San Isidro Hagonoy, Bulacan Philippines 
Aliwalas, Ricardo, businessman; Francisco Homes United 

Methodist Church, San Jose del Monte, Bulacan 

Philippines 
Toquero, SolitoK, pastor; The United Methodist Church, 

Meycauayan, Bulacan Philippines 
Francisco, Ciriaco Q., pastor; Cottingham Memorial United 

Methodist Church, Liang, Malolos Bulacan.Philippines 
Ramos, Norberto M., district superintendent; Liang, Malolos, 

Bulacan Philippines 
delos Santos, Elias L, pastor; The United Methodist Church, 

Polo, Valenzuela M.M., Philippines 
Sadsad, Domingo, district superintendent; Central United 

Methodist Church, Sta. Maria, Bulacan Philippines 



34 



DCA Advance Edition 



Sarangaya, Ismad M., pastor; Central United Methodist 

Church, Sta. Maria, Bulacan Philippines 
Velasco. Rolando C, pastor; The United Methodist Church, 

Hagonoy, Bulacan Philippines 
Flores.Jose M., pastor; The United Methodist Church, 

Quibadia, Obando Bulacan, Philippines 
Tapia, Elizabeth S., seminary faculty; Union Theological 

Seminary, Dasmarinas, Cavite Philippines 
Padilla, Romulo, special appointment; National Council of 

Churches in the Philippines Quezon City, Philippines 

Bulgaria Provisional (2) 

Sec. D Row 1 Seats 7-8 

Asparuchov, Asparuch, assistant; Kompl 'Krasno selo' Bl. 

196, BG-1618 Sofia, Bulgaria 
Altunian, Bedros, superintendent; Han Knim 35, BG-9000 

Varna, Bulgaria 

Reserves 

Michailova, Mariella, doctor; ul. Naiden Gerov 47, BG-9000 

Varna, Bulgaria 
Nalbantski, Daniel, pastor; Ivan-Vasov-Str. 28, BG-7000 

Russe, Bulgaria 

California-Nevada (12) 

Sec. C Row 19 Seats 1-12 

*Extrum-Femandez, Paul (2) ; Council on Ministries; P.O. 

Box 980250, West Sacramento, CA 95798 
Weatherspoon, Dale (1), VISA USA; 619 Monterey 

Boulevard, #1, San Francisco CA 94127 
Knowles, Grady (4), conference Board of Pensions; 300 - 

27th Street, Oakland, CA 94612 
Craft, Precious B. (8) , church musician; 8260 Anton Way, 

Sacramento, CA 95823 
Suzuki, Betty (6), retired; 19 Parklite Circle, Sacramento, 

CA 95831 
Bamett, Jeanne (10), retired; 2340 Gila Way, Sacramento, 

CA 95864 
Dirdak, Paul R. (6), pastor; 1675 California Street, San 

Francisco, CA 94109 
Extrum-Femandez, Renae D. (10), pastor; 1255 First 

Avenue, Oakland, CA 94646 
Wiberg, Linda (3), council on ministries; P.O. Box 980250, 

West Sacramento, CA 95798 
Swisher, Ronald E. (9), district superintendent; P.O. Box 

980250, West Sacramento, CA 95798 
Chen, Peter F. (5) , pastor; 566 North Fifth Street, San Jose, 

CA 95112 
Brown, Jr Warner H. (7), pastor, 1188 - 12th Street, 

Oakland CA 94607 

Reserves 

Cunningham, Molly; 16412 Acorn Drive, Sonora, CA 95370 
Lau, Anne H., student; 4305 Webster Street, Oakland, CA 

94609 
Washington, Rosa, retired; 705 Barcelona Drive, Davis, CA 

95616 
Gleason, Carol, church secretary; 721 Charleston Court, 

Palo Alto, CA 94303 
Brawn, Mel; 1747 Dolores, San Jose, CA 95125 
Chin, Aime; 456 Kentucky Avenue, Berkeley, CA 94707 
Allread, Ardith, district superintendent; 729 Morse Street, 

San Jose, CA 95126 



Fitch, Douglass E., pastor; 4656 Fair Avenue, Oakland, CA 

94619 
Park, Hankyu, district superintendent; 584 Rio Undo, #6, 

ChicoCA 95926 
Arjona.JuanJ., pastor; 1461 - 11th Street, Reedley, CA 93654 
Corson, John E., pastor; 902 Danville Boulevard, Alamo, CA 

94507 
DeWitt-Droke, Nadine, district superintendent; 2362 

Bancroft Way, Berkeley, CA 94704 

California-Pacific (16) 

Sec. C Row 3 Seats 1-8 
Row 4 Seats 1-8 

*Haase, Becky (8) , accountant; 733 Portola Avenue, 

Glendale,CA 91206 
Park, Song Ja (3), associate council director, P.O. Box 6006, 

Pasadena, CA 91102-6006 
Foley, Emma Dell (9), professional volunteer; 2104 

Wellington Road, Los Angeles, CA 90016 
Moore, Mary Elizabeth (10) , professor; 1325 North College 

Avenue, Claremont, CA 91711 
Fukomoto, Jo Ann Y. (1), homemaker/volimteer; 1796 

Hoolehua Street, Pearl City, HI 96782 
Johnson, Duane R. (4), conference treasurer; 629 

Montezuma Way, West Covina, CA 91791 
Pineda, Al (6), associate council director; P.O. Box 6006, 

Pasadena, CA 91102-6006 
Gray, Stefanie A. (7) , student; 10496 Lindbrook Drive, Los 

Angeles, CA 90024 
Farris, Patricia E. (5) , district superintendent; 2540 First 

Avenue, San Diego, CA 92103-6505 
Trotter, Mark C. (3), pastor; 2111 Camino Del Rio, South, 

San Diego CA,92108 
Tinoco, David A (9), district superintendent; 4845 Brockton 

Avenue, Riverside, CA 92506 
Richardson, David L (2), district superintendent; 12741 

Main Street, Garden Grove, CA 92640 
Rhodes-Wickett, Sharon K. (10), pastor; 10497 Wilshire 

Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90024 
Hagiya, Grant}. (8) , pastor; 109 Vista Del Parque, Redondo 

Beach, CA 90277 
Shamana, Beverly]. (6) , associate council director; P.O. 

Box 6006, Pasadena, CA 91102-6006 
Lawson, Jr. James M. (1) , pastor, 3320 West Adams 

Boulevard, Los Angeles CA 90018 

Reserves 

Davis, Rosemary A., diaconal minister; 956 Fenn Court, 

Claremont, CA 91711 
Bose, Trina, student; 13516 Samantha Avenue, San Diego, 

CA 92129 
Seifert, Lois C, Christian education consultant; 607 Leydon 

Lane, Clarenmont, CA 91711 
Jackson, Betty R., nursing professor; 205 EastLoma Alta 

Drive, Altadena, CA 91101 
Edmondson, Christina, student 1009 North Ivy Street, 

Escondido.CA 92026 
Ayers, Steve, teacher; 21158 Wmterset Drive, Saugus, CA 

91350 
Klein, Robert E., church administrator; 711 South Plymouth 

Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90005 
Wrisley, Norton (Bud), accountant; 29360 Pemosa Lane, 

Valley Center, CA 92082 
Huntington, Marilynn M., council director; P.O. Box 6006, 

Pasadena, CA 91 102-6006 



Delegate Information 



35 



Cho, Seog Whan, pastor; 420 East 20th Street, Los Angeles, 

CA 90011 
Abrams, Marvin B., pastor; 1300 San Antonio, Norwalk, CA 

90650 
Villamin, LilyM., pastor; 500 East Colorado Boulevard, 

Pasadena, CA 9 1101 
Kwak, Cheol K, pastor; 243 South Broadway, Redondo 

Beach, CA 90277 
Smith, Robert, pastor; 6050 Hayes Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 

90042 
Cho, Brandon I., district superintendent; 10824 Topanga 

Canyon Boulevard, Chatsworth, CA 91326 
Hsu, LeoL, district superintendent; P.O. Box 1026, Sierra 

Madre,CA 91025-4026 

Central lUinois (16) 

Sec. A Row 2 Seats 1-8 
Row 3 Seats 1-8 

*Reeves, Sr. Richard E. (10), retired engineer, 855 East 

Lake Shore Drive, Decatur IL 62521-3386 
Wilson, J. LaVon (7), education specialist; 4165 Hazelcrest 

Road, Springfield, IL 62703-5239 
Story, Bettie W. (6), conference Director of 

Communications; 1211 North Park Street, P.O. Box 515, 

Bloomington IL 61702-0515 
Gordon, Jinny (3), homemaker; 863 South Greenwood 

Avenue, Kankakee, IL 60901-5208 
Pacey, Stephen R. (5), attorney; P.O. Box 35, Paxton, IL 

60957-0035 
Wier, Delight B. (1), columnist R.R 1, Box 181, Lacon IL 

61504 
Womeldorff, Porter J. (9), retired utility company 

vice-president; 735 Country Manor Drive, Decatur, IL 

62521-2524 
Stedman, Cathy N (2), student; 216 East Cemetery Avenue, 

Chenoa,IL 61726-1353 
Bamett, Vemie T. (3), executive Secretary Preachers' Aid 

Society; 215 Bay Shore Drive, Decatur, IL 62521 
Clark, Terry L (9), district superintendent; 151 Duffy Road, 

Galesburg.IL 61401-2467 
Jones, Cynthia A. (8) , district superintendent; 102 South 

Fayette Street, Jacksonville, IL 62650-2467 
Daughenbaugh, Jr. Howard L; (6), district superintendent, 

1945 West Monroe Street, Suite 105 Springfield, IL 

62704-1505 
Emswiler, Sharon Neufer (5), pastor; 1820 Fifth Avenue, 

Rock Island, IL 61201-8119 
Bortell, James B. (10), pastor; 1401 Spear Drive, Normal, IL 

61761 
Watkins, Bradley F. (7), district superintendent; #7 Dunlap 

Court, Suite A, Savoy IL 61874-9502 
Robinson, Randall F. (4), pastor; P.O. Box 345, Camp Point, 

IL 623200345 

Reserves 

Johnson, C. Annie, retired businesswoman; P.O. Box 274, 

Plymouth, IL 62367-0274 
Dude, Karleen L., homemaker; 901 Randall Drive, Normal, 

IL 61761-2446 
Prussner, Roberta, retired teacher; 2958 South 19000 West 

Road, Reddick, IL 60961-8054 
Hardwick, Judy L., homemaker; 2872 County Road 200 E, 

Fisher, IL 61843-9752 



Cummins, Marlene Simms, conference council staff; 1211 

North Park Street, P.O. Box 515, Bloomington IL 

61702-0515 
Dharmaraj, Glory, Women's Division staff; 24 Rosewood 

Drive, CUnton, IL 61727-2462 
Crawford, Kenneth 0., retired businessman; 1403 North 

Fourth Street, Pekin, IL 61554-2029 
Greene, Paul S., student; P.O. Box 592, Kankakee, IL 60901 
Woodruff, John H., conference treasurer; P.O. Box 515, 

Bloomington, IL 61702-0515 
Hamilton-Kenney, Thomas M., pastor; 814 South Jersey 

Avenue, Normal, IL 61761-4005 
Cox, Danny F., pastor; 104 South Elm, Washington, IL 

61571-2624 
Cramer-Heuerman, Jean A. , pastor; 1203 West Green Street, 

Urbana,IL 61801-2905 
Freeman, Robert K., pastor; 1612 East Capitol Drive, 

Springfield, IL 62703-1322 
Newsome.Jack L, assistant to bishop; 501 East Capitol 

Avenue, Suite 212, Springfield IL 62701-1880 
Snyder, Clyde A., pastor; 2004 South Philo Road, Urbana, IL 

61801-6411 
Owens, Ray, council director; P.O. Box 515, Bloomington, IL 

61702-0515 

Central Luzon (2) 

Sec. C Row 6 Seats 11-12 

Palaganas, Leon L (4), teacher; 90 Zamora Street, Dagupan 

City, Philippines 
Lacaulan,Josue M. (9), district superintendent; Poblacion I, 

Gerona, Tarlac Philippines 

Reserves 

Millan, Chita R., deaconess; Calasiao Educational Center, 

Calasiao, Pangasinan Philippines 
Lamorena, Crispiniano E., lawyer; The United Methodist 

Church, Paniqui, Tarlac Philippines 
Biasbas, Lucrecia F., deaconess; Lingayen Christian Center, 

Lingayen, Pangasinan 2401 Philippines 
Vidal, R. Kathleen S., deaconess; Joyland School, San 

Fabian, Pangasinan Philippines 
Lupdag, Anselmo D., professor; Central Luzon State 

University, Munoz, Nueva Ecija 3120 Philippines 
Cerdan, Francisco C, lawyer; Cerdan Street, Poblacion, 

Anda Pangasinan.Philippines 
Peralta, Dominador M., real estate; Marian Subdivision, 

Visperas Street, Mangaldan Pangasinan 2432,Philippines 
Bailen, Esperanza B., deaconess; Maramba Boulevard, 

Lingayen, Pangasinan Philippines 
Lopez, Warlita A., teacher; The United Methodist Church, 

Paniqui, Tarlac Philippines 
Quitlong, Marcelina A., office worker; 90-A Arellano Street, 

Dagupan City, Philippines 
Nabua, Jaime F., accountant; First United Methodist 

Church, Dagupan City, Philippines 
Garibay, Dante C, office worker; 7 M. H. del Pilar Street, 

Paniqui, Tarlac Philippines 
Estioko, Adelina A., deaconess; 113 Ramos Street, Sto. 

Cristo, Guimba Nueva Ecija,Philippines 
Acosta, Rebecca S., volunteer; 43 Dansalan Street, Guimba, 

Nueva Ecija Philippines 
Millan, Arsenio C, school administrator; Calasiao 

Educational Center, Calasiao, Panganisinan Philippines 
Ceballos, Jesus Rex O., student; Legaspi Street, Paniqui, 

Tarlac Philippines 



36 



DCA Advance Edition 



Gagarin, Josephine M., deaconess; The United Methodist 

Church, San Jose City, Nueva Ecija Philippines 
Dizon, Juanita C, volunteer worker; San Fernando, Victoria, 

Tarlac Philippines 
Nato, Arnold, student; First United Methodist Church, 

Dagupan City, Philippines 
Predas, Manuel E., district superintendent; 27 Alvear Street 

West, lingayen, Pangasinan Philippines 
Vinluan, Victor C, pastor; First United Methodist Church, 

Dagupan City, Philippines 
Casipit, Abraham F., pastor; Stewart Memorial United 

Methodist Church, Lingayen, Pangasinan Philippines 
Guarin, Abraham C, pastor; The United Methodist Church, 

Burgos, Pangasinan Philippines 
Palafox, Benny C, pastor; The United Methodist Church, 

Munoz, Nueva Ecija Philippines 
Camaso, Trefilo, pastor; The United Methodist Church, 

Bolinao, Pangasinan Philippines 
Bailen, Gregorio R., acting college president; Asbury 

College, Maramba Boulevard, lingayen Pangasinan 

2401,Philippines 
Labasan. Imelda F., pastor; The United Methodist Church, 

Del Pilar Street, CamilingTarlac,Philippines 
Raguindinjose Q., retired pastor; 02 Cerdan Street, 

Poblacion, Anda Pangasinan, Philippines 
Nilojeremias B., pastor; The United Methodist Church, 

Guimba, Nueva Ecija Philippines 
Cacho, Warlito D.. pastor; The United Methodist Church, 

San Jose City, Nueva Ecija Philippines 
Palafox, Nerissa S., pastor; The United Methodist Church, 

Munoz, Nueva Ecija Philippines 
Pascua, Lelita R., pastor; The United Methodist Church, 

Padapada, Sta. lgnaciaTarlac,Philippines 
Sales, Esrom S., pastor; Capaoayan, Moncada, Tarlac 

Philippines 
Caasi, Harrison M., district superintendent; Magsaysay, 

Alaminos, Pangasinan Philippines 
Estioko,Jr. Manuel (B.), district superintendent, 113 Ramos 

Street, Sto. Cristo District Guimba, Nueva 

Ecija,Philippines 
Arciaga, Simeon L, pastor; 40 Carriedo Street, Paniqui, 

Tarlac Philippines 
Caole, Simeon €., pastor; 31 Mabini Street, Agno, 

Pangasinan Philippines 
Carlet, Romeo €., pastor; The United Methodist Church, 

Bani, Pangasinan Philippines 

Central Pennsylvania (16) 

Sec. C Row 17 Seats 8-12 
Row 18 Seats 3-12 

Sowers, Gary D. (1), insurance agent; 2430 Bradford Drive, 

York, PA 17402 
Haverstock, Zedna M. (4), conference treasurer; 708 Hilltop 

Drive, New Cumberiand, PA 17070 
Hartman, Shawn (3) , student; 203 Echo Drive, 

Chambersburg, PA 17201-3309 
Barto, Suella C. (10), conference staff; 4350 Board Road, 

Manchester, PA 17345 
Drachler, Stephen E. (8) , press secretary; 3751 Montour 

Street, Harrisburg, PA 17111 
Hill, Judith C. (6), retired; 1819 1/2 North Street, 

Harrisburg, PA 17103 
Bowers, Phyllis M. (4), stewardship foundation associate 

director; 40 Farmington Drive, Jacobus, PA 17407 
Page, Jr. Conrad M. (5), retired, 451 Valley Road, Etters PA 

17319 



*Bowersox, Ronald E. (3), pastor; 415 South 22nd Street, 

Camp Hill, PA 17011 
Zeiders, G. Edwin (10) , councQ director; 3920 Woodvale 

Road, Harrisburg, PA 17109 
Parks, Lewis A. (9), district superintendent; 921 Wallace 

Avenue, Chambersburg, PA 17201-3884 
Alexander, Anthony (8), pastor; 265 Homan Avenue, State 

College, PA 16801 
Webb, Thomas C. (1) , district superintendent; 1326 Montfort 

Drive, Harrisburg, PA 17110 
Halderman, Sharon D. (7), district superintendent; R.R. 3, 

Box 54A, WeUsboro PA,16901 
Fuller, Cynthia R. (6), district superintendent; 31 Baylor 

Boulevard, Lewisburg, PA 17837 
Ciampa, Donald]. (2), pastor; 135 West Simpson, 

Mechanicsburg, PA 17055 

Reserves 

Grubb, Donna, Christian educator; 302 Swan Street, 

Harrisburg, PA 17111 
Weigle, Jennifer, student; 6 Cromwell Street, 

Mechanicsburg, PA 17055 
Miller, Cindy, local church ministry director; R.D. 4, Box 

344A, Tyrone PA 16686 
Plummer, Sr. Kenneth H.; retired, 930 Leidig Drive, 

Chambersburg PA 17201 
Salter, Diane, diaconal minister; 758 Bowman Road, 

Chambersburg, PA 17201 
Spencer, Sharon R., church volunteer; P.O. Box 141, 

Newburg, PA 172404)141 
Kennedy, Judy; 298 Brick Church Road, Troy, NY 12180 
Williams, Scott A., attorney; 516 East Main Street, Muncy, 

PA 17756 
Link, Joanne M., pastor; 210 West Main Street, 

Hummelstown, PA 17036 
Stambach, Paul E., district superintendent; 1200 Haymaker 

Road, State College, PA 16801 
Cole, Calvin K, pastor; 1300 North Beaver Street, York, PA 

17404 
Jacobs, Thomas H., pastor; 1415 Elliott Street, Wllliamsport, 

PA 17701 
Lauchle, Paul A, pastor; 2101 Newberry Street, 

Wllliamsport, PA 17701-1361 
Snider, Martin L , pastor; 420 West South Street, Carlisle, 

PA 17013-2828 
Irwin, Jr. Thomas (H.), conference staff, 1410 Harcourt 

Drive, Harrisburg PA,17110 
Ford, Pamela H., pastor; 64 Ann Street, Middletown, PA 

17057 

Central Texas (12) 

Sec. B Row 2 Seats 6-12 
Row 3 Seats 6-10 

*Auvenshine, William R. (3), college president; 412 

Corsicana, Hillsboro, TX 76645 
Wendland, Barbara (5), writer; 505 Cherokee, Temple, TX 

76504 
Phillips, Cheryl (6), realtor; 2111 Coral, Arlington, TX 76010 
Smith, Hiram (10), merchant; 400 Comanche, DeLeon, TX 

76444 
Trevino-Teddlie, Jeannie (4), diaconal minister; 464 Bailey, 

Fort Worth, TX 76107-2153 
Stroman, Pat (7) , accounts manager; Box 7309, Waco, TX 

76710 



Delegate Information 



37 



Pike, Don M. (1), pastor; 313 North Center, Arlington, TX 

76011 
Phillips,]. D. (6), pastor; 2201 East Park Row, Arlington, TX 

76010 
Huber-Hohls, Ruth (9), district superintendent; Box 156, 

Waxahachie, TX 75165^156 
McKinney,]. Eric (10), district superintendent; Box 67, 

Weatherford, TX 76086^67 
Young, T. Michael (2), pastor; 4833 Selkirk, Ft Worth, TX 

76109 
Radde, Henry W. (8), district superintendent; Box 7740, 

Waco, TX 76714-7740 

Reserves 

Payne, Lillie, pastoral care/nurse; Box 457, Weatherford, 

TX 76086 
Boyd, Gail, English instructor; 1132 Knotty Oaks, Waco, TX 

76712 
Robinson, Bumham, personnel director; 2129 Briardale, 

FortWorth,TX 76119 
Gaspard, Joan, teacher; 504 Englewood Lane, Hurst, TX 

76053 
Hopkins, David, student; 1054 Westbury Lane, Mansfield, 

TX 76063 
Paustian, Donna, communty volunteer; 803 Live Oak, 

Arlington, TX 76012 
Sands, Judith, pastor; 900 Maxfield, Waco, TX 76705 
Allen, Georgia, chaplain; 2710 Good Shepherd, Brownwood, 

TX 76801 
Porter, James R., district superintendent; 1200 Overlook 

Terrace, Suite F, Fort Worth TX 76112-2357 
Russell, Timothy A., Church Growth & Development 

Director; 464 Bailey, Fort Worth, TX 76107-2153 
Robertson, Eugene B., district superintendent; 464 Bailey, 

Suite C, Fort Worth TX 76107-2153 
Henry, Sr Luther W., pastor, 800 West Fifth Street, Fort 

Worth TX 76102 

Central Zaire (12) 

Sec. D Row 13 Seats 1-12 

Mumba, Djamba (3), academic affairs dean; P.O. Box 2747, 

Kinshasa II, Zaire 
Ekoko, Onema (6), UMW president; P.O. Box 2747, 

Kinshasa II, Zaire 
Umembudi, Akasa (7), pilot; P.O. Box 2747, Kinshasa II, 

Zaire 
Poto, Umembudi (6), teacher; P.O. Box 2747, Kinshasa II, 

Zaire 
Ombaku, Onema (4), treasurer; P.O. Box 2747, Kinshasa II, 

Zaire 
Odimba, Kalema (5), school director; P.O. Box 2747, 

Kinshasa II, Zaire 
*Kumbe, Alua (9), district superintendent; P.O. Box 2747, 

Kinshasa II, Zaire 
Mukenge, Liwa (10), youth director; P.O. Box 2747, 

Kinshasa II, Zaire 
Djundu, Lunge (7), rector; P.O. Box 2747, Kinshasa II, Zaire 
Lupaka, Tshita (1), dean; P.O. Box 2747, Kinshasa II, Zaire 
Lodi, Pungumbu (2), dean; P.O. Box 2747, Kinshasa II, Zaire 
Mbukula, Koy (8), pastor; P.O. Box 2747, Kinshasa II, Zaire 

Reserves 

Djamba, Mundeke, pilot P.O. Box 2747, Kinshasa II, Zaire 



Manya, Diamba, doctor; P.O. Box 2747, Kinshasa II, Zaire 
Lomami, Pena, conference lay leader; P.O. Box 2747, 

Kinshasa II, Zaire 
Mikombe, Nseya, doctor; P.O. Box 2747, Kinshasa II, Zaire 
Walu, Onema, nurse; P.O. Box 2747, Kinshasa II, Zaire 
Lumasa, Shala, assistant professor; P.O. Box 2747, Kinshasa 

II, Zaire 
Lenga, Okodiembo, conference treasurer; P.O. Box 2747, 

Kinshasa II, Zaire 
Djungandeke, Pese, pastor; P.O. Box 2747, Kinshasa II, Zaire 
Lukamba, Kalonda, district superintendent; P.O. Box 2747, 

Kinshasa II, Zaire 
Takoy, Onalunge, pastor; P.O. Box 2747, Kinshasa II, Zaire 
Ngandu, Kasongo, pastor; P.O. Box 2747, Kinshasa II, Zaire 
Mbembe, Rev., district superintendent; P.O. Box 2747, 

Kinshasa II, Zaire 
Kasongo, Disashi, pastor; P.O. Box 2747, Kinshasa II, Zaire 
Tshilombo, Rev., district superintendent P.O. Box 2747, 

Kinshasa II, Zaire 

Czech and Slovak Republics (2) 

Sec. D Row 5 Seats 10-11 

Krizova, Jana (3) , science worker referendary; Myslivni 51, 

Bmo-Kohoutovice, Czech-602 00 
*Cervenak, Josef (T) , superintendent; Jecna 19, Praha 2, 

Czech-120 00 

Reserves 

Thai, Josef, leader referendary; Haskova 1, Jihlava, 

Czech-586 01 
Prochazkova, Miroslava, publishing house leader; Panenska 

10, Bratislava, Slovakia-811 03 
Prochazka, Pavel, pastor; Panenska 10, Bratislava, 

Slovakia-811 03 
Bassano.Jiri, pastor;, Jenkovce 26, Slovakia-072 52 

Dakotas (4) 

Sec. C Row 8 Seats 9-12 

*Wagner, Ray (7), retired; 2410 - 12th Street North, Fargo, 

ND 58102 
Hayenga, Mary (1), farmer; R.R., Box 1, Andover SD 57422 
Eberhart, Penelope (3), district superintendent; 2016- 16th 

Avenue NW, Aberdeen, SD 57401 
Bates, Jr, William L. (5), pastor, 1756 South Tenth Street 

Fargo ND 58103 

Reserves 

Muthiah, Marion, retired nurse; 1804 - 12th Avenue SE, 

Mandan, ND 58554 
Ewing, Jack, President Dakota Wesleyan University; 1220 

West University Avenue, Mitchell, SD 57301 
Wilson, Peary, pastor; 1000 First Street, Bismarck, ND 58501 
Reich, Eldon, pastor; 502 South Lincoln, Aberdeen, SD 57401 

Denmark (2) 

Sec. D Row 4 Seats 11-12 

Fredsby, Bent (4), senior consultant Bjerggaardsvaenget 6, 

DK-2840 Holte, Denmark 
Alsted, Christian (1), pastor; Stokhusgade 2, DK-1317 

Copenhagen K, Denmark 



38 



DCA Advance Edition 



Reserves 

Clausen, Henning, rest home director; Otto Rudsvej 9, 

DK-9900 Frederikshavn, Denmark 
Nielsen, Grethe-Lis, secretary; Laerkevej 4, DK-2600 

Glostrup, Denmark 
Rasmussenjorgen, pastor; Strandvej 30, DK-9970 Strandby, 

Denmark 
Sorensen, Ove S., district superintendent Norre alle 86, 

DK-8000 Aarhus C, Denmark 

Desert Southwest (6) 

Sec. B Row 5 Seats 10-11 
Row 6 Seats 10-11 

Huffinan, Joel E. (4), conference treasurer; 837 North 

Grace, Scottsdale, AZ 85257 
Powell, Sr., Larry P. (3), mitigation risk broker, 7921 

Fanciful Avenue, Las Vegas NV 89128 
Sharp, Christie C. (6) , attorney; 4051 West Ajo, Tucson, AZ 

85746-9762 
*Iceman, Anita L (5), district superintendent; 2416 East 

Fourth Street, Tucson, AZ 85719 
Tews, Jane A. (1), pastor; 331 South Cooper Road, Gilbert, 

AZ 85233 
Standiford, James W. (10), pastor; 215 East University Drive, 

Tempe.AZ 85281 

Reserves 

Moffet, Gretta M., retired general church employee; 5925 

East 21st Street, Tucson, AZ 85711 
Disbrow, Rebecca L, student; 2416 West Lomita, Mesa, AZ 

85202 
Stokes, Nancy D., network expansion specialist; 15824 

North 57th Street, Scottsdale, AZ 85254 
Carrico, Ruben G., pastor; 3214 East Palm Lane, Phoenix, 

AZ 85008 
Haas, Jerry P. , pastor; 1431 West Magee Road, Tucson, AZ 

85704 
Holt, Nathan, district superintendent; 900 East Desert Inn, 

#519, Las Vegas NV 89109 

Detroit (12) 

Sec. B Row 8 Seats 1-12 

*Cook, Shirley (2), retired general manager; 806 Olive 

Road, Oxford, MI 48371 
Edwards, Alma B. (5), retired school administrator; 15801 

Providence Drive, No. 75F, Southfield Ml 48075 
Euper, Jacqueline K. (3), project director; 804 Fourth Street, 

Lapeer, MI 48446 
Tibbits, Lewis (1), camp manager; 450 North Miller, 

Sebewaing, MI 48709 
Adams, L Cecile (10), council director; 6244 Bingham, 

Dearborn, Ml 48146 
Stanton, Harold (4), retired Ford Motor manager; 942 

Donmar Court, Birmingham, Ml 48009-2910 
Barrett, Joy A. (10), pastor; 3617 Mackinaw, Saginaw, Ml 

48602 
Titus, Phylemon D. (3), pastor; 15888 Archdale, Detroit, Ml 

48277 
McCallum, Marvin H. (6), district superintendent; 1228 

Sbcth Street, Port Huron, Ml 48060 
Goudie, Robert F. (9), pastor; 11328 Arnold, Redford, MI 

48239 



Bamsey, Alfred T. (7), pastor; 120 South Street Street, Ann 

Arbor, MI 48104 
Quick, William K. (8), pastor; 8000 Woodward Avenue, 

Detroit, MI 48202 

Reserves 

Thompson, Janelle A., student; 525 South Homer Road, 

Midland, MI 48640 
Buxton, Sue, volunteer; 1402 Lyons Avenue, Royal Oak, MI 

48073-3174 
Ferguson, Tyson, student; 1361 Fletcher, National City, MI 

48748 
Halter, Kenneth, retired engineer; 5158 Candlewood Drive, 

Grand Blanc, MI 48439 
Hook, Jay W., retired; 2130 Nemeskal Road, Maple City, MI 

49664 
Curtis, Bud, volunteer; 520 North Oak Street, Fenton, MI 

48430 
Boayue, Charles S.G., urban missioner; 21700 Northwestern 

Highway, Suite 1200, Southfield MI 48075 
Lee, Linda, district superintendent; 21700 Northwestern 

Highway, Suite 1200, Southfield Ml 48075 
Kellerman, James G., pastor; 4471 Linden Park Drive, Bay 

City, MI 48706 
Hamish,John E., associate general secretary; P.O. Box 871, 

Nashville, TN 37202 
Euper, Terry A., pastor; 804 Fourth Street, Lapeer, MI 48446 
Ott, Louise R., pastor; 865 Virginia Place, Ypsilanti, MI 48198 

East Mindanao Philippines Provisional (2) 

Sec. A Row 1 Seats 7-8 

Deocampo, Jeanne G. (3), teacher; 204 Oriole Street, 

Ecoland 2, Matina Davao City,Philippines 
Andres, Delfin L. (2), pastor; Blk. 16, Lot 5, Phase II San 

Lorenzo Village, Puan,8000 Davao City,Philippines 

Reserves 

Lucero, Rhodie A., teacher; College of Arts and Sciences, U. 

M., Bolton Davao City, Philippines 
de Gusman, Ruben, forester; TTie United Methodist 

Church, San Francisco, Agusan del Sur Philippines 
Bilog, Fidela L, deaconess; 104-1 CM. Recto Street, Davao 

City, Philippines 
Diaz, Evelyn G., teacher; 3 Padre Gomez Street, Davao City, 

Philippines 
Atienzar, Agustin L., businessman; Fulmar Street, Zone 3, 

Belisario Heights Bajada, Davao City.Philippines 
Dumlao, Eleanor S., businesswoman; 856 Vinzon Street, 

Davao City, Philippines 
Nebran, Patrocinio 0., businesswoman; Townsite United 

Methodist Church, Kapalong, Davao del Norte 

Philippines 
Pableo, Franelli C, nurse; 63 Pampanga Executive Homes, 

Lanang, Davao City Philippines 
Cruz, Benedicto V., retired teacher; 170 Pearl Street, SM 

Village, Bangkal Davao City,Philippines 
Alejo, David, farmer; R.T.R., Agusan del Norte, Philippines 
Rosario, Virgilio S., nurse; 8 Dona Aurelia Village, Aiiport 

Drive, Sasa Davao City,Philippines 
Camicer, Estelita, teacher; The United Methodist Church, 

Osmena Street, Tagum Davao del Norte,Philippines 
Guzman, Josue R., conference stewardship and resource 

development officer; 978 Osmena Street, Tagum, Davao 

del Norte Philippines 



Delegate Information 



39 



Hermano, Santos C, pastor; First United Methodist Church, 

Kapalong, Davao del Norte Philippines 
Duro-on, Pedro N., district superintendent; 978 Osmena 

Street, Tagum, Davao del Norte Philippines 
Bilog, Francisco B., pastor; 104-1 C. M. Recto Street, Davao 

City, Philippines 
Miguel, Renato C. , sabbatical leave; P.O. Box 224, Tagum, 

Davao del Norte Philippines 
Ramoran, Jaime C, seminary student; Wesley Divinity 

School, Mabini Extension, Cabanatuan City Philippines 
Sanchez, Federico A., pastor; The United Methodist Church, 

Poblacion Compestela, Davao del Norte Philippines 
Cardinez, Bernardo M, seminary student; Union 

Theological Seminary, Pala-Pala, Dasmarinas 

Cavite,Philippines 
Porquillo, RogelioA., district superintendent; P.O. Box 17, 

Butuan City, Philippines 
Namoc, Nicholas B., pastor; The United Methodist Church, 

San Francisco, Agusan del Sur Philippines 
Rodriguez, Erlincy C, pastor; The United Methodist 

Church, New Bataan, Davao del Norte Philippines 
Rosquita, Florencio, retired pastor; The United Methodist 

Church, Osmena Street, Tagum Davao del 

Norte,Philippines 

East Ohio (22) 

Sec. C Row 1 Seats 1-12 
Row 2 Seats 1-10 

Anderson, James (5), retired; 333 Monroe Street, Dover, 

OH 44622 
Yoost, Timothy (1) , student; 1445 Royal Oak Drive, 

Mansfield, OH 44906 
Dunlap, Catherine (10), diaconal minister; 1435 Main 

Street, Box 646, Kent OH 44240 
Lutz, Sandra W. (10), professor; 5504 Frazer Avenue, N.W., 

North Canton OH 44720 
Washington, Stanley (3), retired; 843 Miami Avenue, 

Youngstown, OH 44505 
Chase, Dottie (6), homemaker; 112 Crestwood Avenue, 

Willard, OH 44890 
Maxwell, Cecil (9), retired; 329 East Main Street, 

Cardington, OH 43315 
Aubuchon, David R. (4), conference treasurer; P.O. Box 

2800, North Canton, OH 44720 
Cromwell, Alice (8), homemaker; 800 South 15th Street, 

#1-624, Sebring OH 44672 
Griffith, Daniel (2), student; 1469 Robinwood Road, 

Alliance, OH 44601 
Green, Mareyjoyce (7), professor; 16116 Judson Drive, 

Cleveland, OH 44128 
Yoost, Charles D. (10), district superintendent; 100 Park 

Avenue West, Suite 203, Mansfield OH 44902 
*Palmer, Gregory V. (5), pastor; 170 Seminary Street, Berea, 

OH 44017 
Skinner, James G. (4), administrative assistant; 8800 

Cleveland Avenue, N.W., Nortii Canton OH 44720 
Jennings, Irwin E. (9) , district superintendent; 2098 Portage 

Road, #375, Wooster OH 44691 
Rollins, Benita (6), district superintendent; 30 West Front 

Sti-eet, Youngstown, OH 44503 
Lefelar, Donald E. (10), pastor; 3650 Lander Road, Pepper 

Pike, OH 44124 
Dyck, Sally (1), pastor; 2420 South Taylor Road, Cleveland 

Heights, OH 44118 
Stultz, Valerie W. (3), pastor; 1556 Rex Drive, Orrville, OH 

44667 



Skelley-Watts, Joan E. (8), district superintendent; 1314 
Mentor Avenue, Suite 1, Painesville OH 44077-1835 

Chalker, Kenneth W. (7), pastor; 3000 Euclid Avenue, 
Cleveland, OH 44115 

Han, James (2), pastor; 3429 Harris Avenue, N.W., Canton 
OH4470&-1018 

Reserves 

Martin, Stephen, student; 16 Keewaydin Drive, Timberlake, 

OH 44095 
Church, Daniel, hospital director; 3825 Blackburn Road, 

N.W., Canton OH 44718 
Lautzenheiser, Ray, teacher; Box 134, Hammondsville, OH 

43930 
Cuckler, Nancy, retired assistant claims manager; 4188 

Lancaster Lane, Kent, OH 44240 
Espinoza, Lorena, computer operator; 1965 West 44th 

Sti-eet, Cleveland, OH 44113 
Sb-eiff, Fritz, student; 26370 EdgecM Drive, Euclid, OH 

44132 
Ponzani, Joe, dentist; P.O. Box 241, Cadiz, OH 43907 
Tappan, Marion, retired; 1425 Forest Hills Boulevard, 

Cleveland, OH 44118 
Ehrman, James W., lawyer; 7144 Youngstown-Salem Road, 

Canfield, OH 44406 
Burdette, Carole, homemaker; 8200 Fulton Road, 

Tippecanoe, OH 44699 
Bemes, Dale, retired; 5312 Amherst Avenue, N.W., 

Massillon OH 44646 
Shank, Donald R. , pastor; 15 Public Square, Willoughby, 

OH 44094 
Collier, Mark H., college dean; 275 Eastland Avenue, Berea, 

OH 44017 
Harvey, William R., pastor; 120 Cleveland Avenue, S.W., 

Canton OH 44702 
Scavuzzo, David J., pastor; 852 West Bath Road, Cuyahoga 

Falls, OH 44223 
Zagray, Allan H., pastor; 422 Walnut Street, Coshocton, OH 

43812 
Espinoza, Modesto, pastor; 1965 West 44th Street, Cleveland, 

OH 44113 
Hunter, Craig A., CCOM associate director; P.O. Box 2800, 

North Canton, OH 44720 
Olin, Judith A., council director; P.O. Box 2800, North 

Canton, OH 44720 
Edwards, Neriah G., pastor; 4069 Eastwood Lane, 

Warrensville, OH 44122 
McCartney, William A., seminary field education director; 

3081 Columbus Pike, Box 1204, Delaware OH 43015 
Ehrman, Kenneth P., pastor; 27650 Center Ridge Road, 

Westiake, OH 44145 

East Philippines (2) 

Sec. A Row 10 Seats 11-12 

Panganiban, Rustico V. (5), judge; Symphony Street, Sta. 

Cecilia Village, Las Pinas Metro Manila.Philippines 
*Garibay, Limerio C. (6), Union Theological Seminary; P.O. 

Box 841, Manila, Philippines 

Reserves 

Aherrera, Lydia S., businesswoman; 89 - 9th Avenue, Cubao, 

Quezon City Philippines 
Lucas, Pag-AsaT., deaconess; Harris Memorial College, 

P.O. Box 1174, Manila Philippines 



40 



DCA Advance Edition 



Pattugalan, Roland I., retired brigadier general; 20 Jasmine 

Street, Rexas District, Quezon City Philippines 
Dimalanta, Gloria B., government employee; 31 Jasmine 

Street, Mapayapa Village II, Quezon City Philippines 
Cajiuat, Purita 0., administrator; c/o PACE., 2nd Floor, 

Puno Building 47 Kalayaan Avenue.Quezon 

City,Philippines 
de los Santos, Edna Flor M., consultant; Blk. 76, Lot 29, 

Lagro Subdivision Novaliches, Quezon City .Philippines 
Habacon, Araceli E., businesswoman; 11 J. Asilo Street, 

Taytay, Rizal Philippines 
Kasiguran, Aluida L, deaconess; Del Monte United 

Methodist Church, 55 Guevarra Street, SFDM Quezon 

City,Philippines 
Gerente, Nestor S., student; 5161 East Braly Avenue, 

Fresno, California 93755 
Mostoles, Rhodita M., deaconess; Ecumenical Chapel, 

Villamor Airbase, Pasay City Philippines 
Sabado, Hilario, retired; c/o Muntinlupa United Methodist 

Church, New Bilibio Prison, Type B 

Muntinlupa,Philippines 
Villamayor, Aurora A., music professor; 55 Captain AUano 

Street, Angono, Rizal Philippines 
Nilo, Giovanni Montini S., businessman; c/o San Juan 

United Methodist Church, 671 M. Salvador, San Juan 

Philippines 
Paraso, Glen V., physician; 20 Jasmine Street, Rexas 

District, Quezon City Philippines 
Rubio, Fe, nurse; c/o Sta. Cruz United Methodist Church, 

879 Flores Street, Bo Umboy Sta. Cruz, 

Laguna.Philippines 
Martinez, Rolando C, pastor; 671 M. Salvador Street, San 

Juan, Metro Manila Philippines 
Guerrero, Anacleto G. , pastor; 130 Kamuning Road, Quezon 

City, Philippines 
Pedracio, Danilo T., pastor; Blk. 89, Lot 24, Lagro 

Subdivision Novaliches,Quezon City.Philippines 
Kasiguran, Jr., Cirilo T/?.), pastor, 55 Guevarra Street, 

SFDM Quezon City.Philippines 
Cajiuat, Toribio C, district suprintendent; PACE., 2nd 

Floor, Puno Building 47 Kalayaan Avenue,Quezon 

City,Philippines 
Dungalen, Osias L, pastor; Rizal Avenue, Taytay, Rizal 

Philippines 
Cera, Jr., Hermogenes ('C), pastor. Susano Road. Deparo 

Novaliches. Metro Manila.Philippines 
Canete, Alejandro P. , pastor; 19 Osmena Street, Lifehomes, 

Rosario Pasig.Philippines 
Tangonan, Lite C. pastor; 915 Quezon Avenue Extension. 

Quezon City, PWlippines 
Flores, Maximo M., pastor; Petrona Street. Buenamar 

Subdivision. Novaliches Quezon City.Philippines 
Latonero, Simeon L, pastor; 943 Aurora Boulevard, Cubao, 

Quezon City Philippines 
Ullo, Arsenio, pastor; 6A-3, Blk. 3, Lot 5 Pacita Complex,San 

Pedro, Laguna, Philippines 
Crisostomo, Salvador, pastor; 41 South Fabian Street, Robles 

Subdivision, San Juan Cainta, Rizal,Philippines 
Castorillo, Nelson, pastor; Lot 2, Blk. 10, Lilac Street 

Hacienda Heights,Subdivision M'kina,Philippines 
Legaspi, Noel S., pastor; Rizal Avenue, Taytay, ^al 

Philippines 



Eastern Angola (2) 

Sec. A Row 18 Seats 9-10 

Oliveira, Costa (2), administrative director; Caixa Postal No. 

9, Melange, Angola 
Mendonca, Benvinda (9), pastor; Caixa Postal No. 9, 

Melange, Angola 

Reserves 

Correia, Franco, men's director; Caixa Postal No. 9, 

Melange, Angola 
Xavier, Geraldo, pastor; Caixa Postal No. 9, Melange, Angola 

Eastern Pennsylvania (14) 

Sec. B Row 7 Seats 1-7 
Row 8 Seats 1-7 

*Ladd, Keith M. (7), corporation president; Box 345, High 

Spire Road, Lyndell PA 19354 
Daugherty, Ruth A (10), consultant/educator; 892 Justin 

Lane, West Chester, PA 19382 
Hamilton, Hattie G. (6), retired; 5321 West Berks Street, 

Philadelphia, PA 19131 
Nicholson, Anne D. (5), church secretary; 108 Washington 

Street, Strasburg, PA 17579 
Ford, Lenora Thompson (4), corporation president; 5734 

West Oxford Street, Philadelphia, PA 19131 
Gibson, Thomas D. (9), church business administrator; 

3122 Club Drive, Allentown. PA 18103 
Wilcock, Deborah M. (3), student; 51 IB Campbell Hall, 

Clarion University, Clarion PA 16214 
Fisher, Violet L. (10), district superintendent; 1316 Sonnet 

Lane, West Chester, PA 19380-1059 
Yrigoyen, Charles (8), General Secretary General 

Commission on Archives and History; 2 Hemlock Lane, 

Morristown, NJ 07960 
Johnson, Alfred (5) , district superintendent; 12 Farwood 

Road, Wynnewood, PA 19096-4007 
Good, Menno E. (2) , pastor; 15 Woodside Avenue, Reading, 

PA 19609 
Hassinger, Susan W. (3), Conference Director of Office of 

Resourcing; P.O. Box 820, VaUey Forge, PA 19482-0820 
DiPaolo, Joseph (1), pastor; 102 Sunset Drive, New Hope, 

PA 18938-1019 
McKonly, Melinda L. (6), district superintendent; 922 

Parkway Road, Allentown, PA 18104-3341 

Reserves 

Blaker, Fallon, retired educator; Hughes Avenue Route 895 

& 443, P.O. Box 22, New Ringgold PA 17960 
Derr, Donna F., Director of Education and Advocacy; 

Family Services, 15 East Dupont Street, Ridley Park PA 

19078-3299 
Henderson, Betty A, housing authority deputy director; 

3413 West Allegheny Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19132 
Costill, Chrissy, customer service; 4 Highfield Circle, 

Conyngham, PA 18219 
Dickert, Marion N., church volunteer; 900 Mickley Road, 

Apt. Gl-2, Whitehall PA 18052 
Christopher, Ula D., diaconal minister; 53 Sonia Lane, 

Broomall, PA 19008-1423 
Sowers, Geoffrey L, printing company president; 801 South 

12th Street, Lebanon, PA 17042 
Edmonds, Claude A, pastor; 439 Glen Echo Road, 

Philadelphia, PA 19119 



Delegate Information 



41 



Bartlow, Michele W., pastor; 2305 Laurel Road, Reading, PA 

19609-1218 
Cotto, Irving, pastor; 1804 Wilderness Road, Lancaster, PA 

17603-9317 
Snyder, Herbert J. , pastor; 3212 School Lane, Drexel Hill, PA 

19026-1441 
Moloney, Alfred S., metro ministries executive director; 2101 

Belmont Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19131 
Tatem, Dorothy W., pastor; 5620 Wyalusing Avenue, 

Philadelphia, PA 19131 
Dufresne, Sandra F., district superintendent; 130 West 

Madison Street, Mohnton, PA 19540-1205 

Estonia Provisional (2) 

Sec. D Row 12 Seats 11-12 

Lilleoja, Tarmo (6) , Estonian Bible Society Editor; Kihnu 

G-53, Tallinn EE0035, Estonia 
*Pamamets, Olav (7), superintendent; Endla 44-1, Tallinn 

EE0006, Estonia 

Reserves 

Rahuvarm, Andreas, Youth Center Secretary; Vilde Tee 

142-12, TalUnn EE0026, Estonia 
Tserenkov, Juri, Administrative Board Lay Member; 

Karberi 28-29, Tallinn EE0038, Estonia 
Lanberg, Georgi, pastor; Akadeemia Tee 22-30, Tallinn 

EE0026, Estonia 
Norak, Andrus, pastor; Box 166, Tartu Postimaja EE2400, 

Estonia 

Finland-Finnish Provisional (2) 

Sec. C Row 10 Seats 11-12 

Rajamaa, Iris Ch. (8), administrative secretary; 

Punavuorenkatu 2 A 4, 00120 Helsinki, Finland 
*Rajamaa, Tapani J. (7), superintendent; Punavuorenkatu 

2 A 4, 00120 Helsinki, Fin'and 

Reserves 

Backman, Lara Ch., student; Aapelink. 1, 02230 Espoo, 

Finlcind 
Mustonen, Antti R., pastor; Inkilanmaenk. 28 A 5, 70340 

Kuopio, Finland 

Finland-Swedish Provisional (2) 

Sec. A Row 1 Seats 9-10 

Soderstrom, Marcus (6), student; Dobelnsg. 25, FIN-68600 

Jakobstad, Finland 
Wegelius, Fredrik (5) , superintendent; Kantelevagen 26 D 

11, FIN-67300 Karleby, Finland 

Reserves 

Palmberg, Mervi, housewife; Djaknegatan 6, FIN-06100 

Borga, Finland 
Soderstrom, Gosta, pastor; Dobelnsgatan 25, FIN-68600 

Jakobstad, Finland 



Florida (28) 

Sec. A Row 12 Seats 9-12 
Row 13 Seats 1-12 
Row 14 Seats 1-12 

Massey, Mary Alice (3), homemaker; 6750 Epping Forest 

Way, #106, Jacksonville FL 32217 
McKeown, Leland P. (3), retired insurance agent; 1025 

Mildred Avenue, Brooksville, FL 34601 
Carson, Kit (7), Internal Revenue Service retiree; 18663 SW 

94th Court, Miami, FL 33157 
Moxley, Jody P. (5) , homemaker; P.O. Box 1445, Titusville, 

FL 32780 
Furman, Jr., Frank (H.), 4; insurance executive, 900 NE 

Third Avenue, Pompano Beach FL 33061 
Roberts, Rodell F. (6), psychologist; P.O. Box 1783, 

Jacksonville, FL 32201 
Zimmerman, Emily Ann (9), homemaker; 7204 San Carlos 

Road, Jacksonville, FL 32217 
Mason, Betty Sue (6) , homemaker; 202 West Powhattan 

Drive, Tampa, FL 33604 
Hamilton, Tom W. (10), diaconal minister; 4845 NE 25th 

Avenue, Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33308 
Pearce, Charles (1), cost consultant; 1610 Glenwood Road, 

DeLand, FL 32720 
Sessums, T. Terrell (7), attorney; 1113 Dunbar Avenue, 

Tampa, FL 33629 
Bass, Ressie Mae (8), GBGM staff; 475 Riverside Drive, 

Room 1501, New York NY 10115 
Collins, Dorothy (2) , homemaker; 238 Monte Cristo 

Boulevard, Tierra Verde, FL 33715 
Fields, Lynette (8) , social worker; 305 SW 43rd Avenue, 

Miami, FL 33134 
*Kammerer, Charlene P. (10) , pastor; 1700 North Meridian 

Road, Tallahassee, FL 32303 
Wills, Jr.. Richard]. (3), pastor, 4845 NE 25th Avenue, Ft. 

Lauderdale FL 33308 
Jennings, James F. (9), district superintendent; P.O. Box 

144880, Coral Gables, FL 33114 
Riddle, Barbara W. (10) , district superintendent; 1415 

LaSalle Street, Jacksonville, FL 32207 
Hamish, James A. (9) , pastor; 500 West Piatt Street, Tampa, 

FL 33606 
Ewing, E. Keith (2), pastor; 1005 West Main Street, 

Leesburg,FL 34748 
Brazelton, David L. (8), district superintendent; P.O. Box 

290655, Tampa, FL 33687-0655 
Courtoy, Charles W. (4), pastor; 6704 Trail Ridge Drive, 

Lakeland, FL 33813 
Johnson, Dan (7) , pastor; 3536 NW Eighth Avenue, 

Gainesville, FL 32605 
Barnes, William S. (6), pastor; 4851 South Apopka-Vineland 

Road, Orlando, FL 32819 
Roughton, Philip H. (1), pastor; 336 South Halifax Drive, 

Ormond Beach, FL 32176 
Hunter III, George G. (2), seminary dean and professor; 

Asbury Theological Seminary, Wilmore, KY 40390 
Pickett, William A. (4), pastor; 731 East Fairlane Avenue, 

Oriando, FL 32809 
Short, Riley P. (5), pastor; 72 Lake Morton Drive, Lakeland, 

FL 33801 



Reserves 

Dodge, David A., diaconal minister; 3536 NW Eighth 
Avenue, Gainesville, FL 32605 



42 



DC A Advance Edition 



Bove, Jose P., diaconal minister; 72 Lake Morton Drive, 

Lakeland, FL 33801 
Yost, James, electrical engineer; 12021 Orange Grove Drive, 

Tampa, FL 33618 
Springer, joann L., retired teacher; 316 Raymond Avenue, 

Frostproof, FL 33843 
Tabbert Russell, insurance and financial planner; 6880 East 

Chanel Drive, Hernando, FL 34442 
Smith, Alice I., retired teacher; 19252 Blount Road, Lutz, FL 

33549 
Fowler, Lloyd (Bud) F., retired; 2956 Starwood Drive, 

Oviedo,FL 32765 
Diaz de Arce, Gabriel H.; Route 4, Box 315, Lake City FL 

32055 
Johns, June A., homemaker; 555 NW Fourth Avenue, Apt 

412, Boca Raton FL 33432 
himan, Jack C, insurance executive; 520 Virginia Drive, 

Winter Park, FL 32789 
Bright, Joyce W., technical solutions consultant; 3491 

Colwyn Court, Orlando, FL 32812 
Cox, Elizabeth E., retired elementary principal; 31 West 

View Lane, Cocoa Beach, FL 32931 
Yost, Lois A., retired teacher; 12021 Orange Grove Drive, 

Tampa, FL 33618 
Weinberg, Nancy L, day care center owner; 409 Fourth 

Place, Merritt Island, FL 32953 
Powell, Joseph C, district superintendent; P.O. Box 3545, 

Tallahassee, FL 32315 
Burkholder, Anne L, pastor; 601 Center Street, Femandma 

Beach, FL 32034 
Brewer, David T., CCOM Executive Director; P.O. Box 

3767, Lakeland, FL 33802 
Branson, Oswald P., President Bethune-Cookman College; 

640 Second Avenue, Daytona Beach, FL 32114-3099 
Cahoon, Pamela A, CROS Ministries Executive Director; 

4401 Garden Avenue, West Palm Beach, FL 33405 
Hill, Teresa E., pastor; P.O. Box 157, Roseland, FL 32957 
Green, John H, district superintendent; P.O. Box 31060, 

Sarasota, FL 34232 
Copeland, Delmas M., district superintendent; P.O. Box 

2625, Lakeland, FL 33806 
Simon, John P., district superintendent 2935 Washington 

Road, West Pahn Beach, FL 33405 
Finklea, W. Ray, district superintendent; 700 North 

Wickham Road, #205, Melbourne FL 32935 
McEntire, W. David, pastor; 900 Brandywine Road, West 

Palm Beach, FL 33409 
Acevedo, Jorge A., pastor; 4845 NE 25th Avenue, FL 

Lauderdale, FL 33308 
Icaza-Willetts, Migdalia L, General Board of Discipleship 

staff; 3720 Belle Oaks Drive, Antioch, TN 37013 
Fox, Robert H., district superintendent; 901 West Main 

Street, Leesburg, FL 34748 

German East (2) 

Sec. D Row 7 Seats 9-10 

Kiebling, Dieter (8), vice-mayor; Schmaizbachsiedlung 45, 

08468 Unterheinsdorf, Germany 
Kober, Friedhelm (6), superintendent; Lessingstrasse 6, 

08058 Zurickau, Germany 

Reserves 

Fleming, Gert, chemist Albert-Kohler-Str. 81, 09122 

Chemnitz, Germany 
Rochlitzer, Klaus, administration manager; Zeisigwaldstr. 

80, 09130 Chemnitz, Germany 



Lasch, Gabriele, administration manager; Bahnhofstrabe 

33, 07639 Bad Klosterlausnitz, Germany 
Heidler, Hartmut mathematician; Lobnitzer Str. 36, 09599 

Freiberg, Germany 
Meisel, Ulrich, chemist Mittelbreite 46, 06849 Dessau, 

Germany 
Klement Birgit deacon; C.-v.-Ossietzky-Str. 11, 08280 Aue, 

Germany 
Lenk, Stefan, engineer; RicardarHuch-Str. 97, 08280 Aue, 

Germany 
Weibbach, Christian, mechanic; Gartenstr. 10, 09227 

Dittersdorf, Germany 
Spranger, Friedrich, engineer, Dobenaustr. 110, 08523 

Plauen, Germany 
Kleinhempel, Maria, deacon; Auerhammerstr. 30, 08280 

Aue, Germany 
Roder, Thomas, pastor; Gasanstaltstr. 172, 09474 

Crottendorf, Germany 
Ruhnow, Wolfgang, pastor; Dorfstrabe 19, 09465 Cranzahl, 

Germany 
Schieck, Lothar, pastor; Bellinostrabe 35, 72764 Reutlingen, 

Germany 
Uhlmann, Herbert, superintendent Wiener Strabe 56, 01219 

Dresden, Germany 
Gunther, Thomas, pastor; Bahnhofstrabe 33, 07639 

Klosterlausnitz, Germany 
Gunther, Andreas, pastor; Hauptstrabe 32, 09227 

Dittersdorf, Germany 
Mann, Reinhold, pastor; Schneebergerstrabe 2, 08321 

Zschorlau, Germany 
Herrrmann, Ludwig, pastor; Friedensstrabe 9, 02763 Zittau, 

Germany 
Neels, Jorg Egbert, pastor; Am Anger 11, 08228 Rodewisch, 

Germany 
Georgi, Christoph, pastor; Strabe der Einheit 11, 09423 

Gelenau, Germany 

German North (2) 

Sec. BRow4;'.-;-itsll-12 

Minor, Ute (7), lay preacher; Bemhard-Bastlein-Str. 35, 

D-10367 Berlin, Germany 
Gruneke, Christel (3), pastor; Mozartstr. 53, D-42115 

Wuppertel, Germany 

Reserves 

Theysohn, Reinhard, lay preacher; Samowstr. 39, D-18435 

Stralsund, Germany 
Magdowski, Axel, administrator; Bomimerstr. 4, D-10711 

Berlin, Germany 
Schempp, Ulrich, manager; Fritz-Solnitz-Weg 17, D-22417 

Hamburg, Germany 
Herrmann, Hans-Wilhelm, manager; Schmachtenbergw^ 

29b, D42113 Wuppertal, Germany 
Steinert Ruthild, teacher; Am Riedenbach 58, D-49082 

Osnabruck, Germany 
Putzke, lugeborg, teacher; Achtermohlen 37a, D-26129 

Oldenburg, Germany 
Muller, Marianne, draftswoman; Scharhomstr. 2d, D-22880 

Wedel, Germany 
Junga, Klaus E., tax consultant Burger Landstr. 242, 

D42659 Solingen, Germany 
Wolring, Elsbeth, bank employee; TTiomasstr. 48, D-27553 

Delmenhorst Germany 
Sieweck, Kriemhild, housewife; Ammonstr. 1, D-16225 

Eberswalde, Germany 



Delegate Information 



43 



Albers, Siegfried, mayor; Up de Cast 12, D-26556 

Westerholt, Germany 
Mittelstadt, Holger, teacher; Dieffenbachstr. 39, D-10967 

Berlin, Germany 
Marquardt, Manfred, pastor; Hagstr. 8, D-72762 Reutlingen, 

Germany 
Stein, Hans-Ulrich, superintendent; Menzelstr. 20, D45147 

Essen, Germany 
Selle, Manfred, pastor; Schildescher Str. 102, D-33611 

Bielefeld, Germany 
Lodewigs, Siegfried, superintendent; Eilbeker Weg 84, 

D-22089 Hamburg, Germany 
Voigt. Karl Heinz, pastor; Hardenbergstr. 15, D-24105 Kiel. 

Germany 
Michalski, Hans, superintendent; Schroderstr. 5, D-10115 

Berlin, Germany 
Renders, Helmut, pastor; Abendrothsweg 43, D-20251 

Hamburg, Germany 
Steeger, Hans-Albert, pastor; Schmachtenberg weg 29, 

D42113 Wuppertal, Germany 
Gotz, Matthias, pastor; Schroderstr. 5, D-10115 Berlin, 

Germany 
Straka, Gabriel, pastor; Dieffenbachstr. 39, D-10967 Berlin, 

Germany 
Kraft, Irene, pastor; Heinrichstr. 63, D-49080 Osnabruck, 

Germany 
Mohr, Karsten W., superintendent; Fritz-Solmitz-Weg 27, 

D-22417 Hamburg, Germany 

German South (2) 

Sec. C Row 9 Seats 11-12 

Fischer, Bemd D. (1), teacher; Eschenauer Str. 27, 90411 

Numberg, Germany 
*Besserer, Armin (10), superintendent; Haglenstr. 60, 72793 

Pfullingen, Germany 

Reserves 

Egler, Gerhard, director; Auf der Hohe 37, 78048 

Villengen-Schwenningen, Germany 
Dillman, Use, nurse; Riesbergstr. 70, 71540 Murrhardt, 

Germany 
Schlagenhauf, Karin, general practitioner; Bolingerstr. 38, 

72336 Bolingen, Germany 
Fauser, Kurt, administrative official; Winzerstr. 18/1, 72766 

Reutlingen, Germany 
Heissler, Udo, lawyer; Taunusstr. 15, 70469 Stuttgart, 

Germany 
Schmdz, Rainer, professor; Imenstr. 36, 74226 Nordheim, 

Germany 
Speck, Heinz, bank manager; Gutenbergstr. 26, 73779 

Deizisau, Germany 
Ganzle, Sigrid, catechist; Holdenweg 46, 72138 

Kirchentellinsturt Germany 
Christner, Hannelore, home economist; St.-Leonhard-Str. 

3 1 , 72764 Reudingen, Germany 
Grasle, Paul, teacher; Augelbaumstr. 12, 74211 Leingarten, 

Germany 
Witzig, Hartmut, manager; Cheruskerstr. 47, 71101 

Schanaich, Germany 
Hetzner, Armin, teacher; Humbddstr. 40, 91522 Ansbach, 

Germany 
Knoller, Heidelore, housewife; Friedensstr. 6, 73728 

Esslingen, Germany 
Wuchterl, Rudolf, measuring manager; Silcherstr. 98, 73614 

Schamdorf, Germany 



Burrer, Helmut, tax advisor; Georg-Wagner-Str. 65, 72202 

Nagold, Germany 
Schert, Siegfried, teacher; Karlstr. 21, 71394 Kemeni 2, 

Germany 
Jetter, Armin, publisher; Grundstr. 5, 82061 Neuried, 

Germany 
Stahl, Reiner, superintendent; Judtstr. 15, 91522 Ansbach, 

Germany 
Bohringer, Norbert, pastor; Wallstr. 10, 71364 Winnenden, 

Germany 
Rieker, Wolfgang, pastor; Panoramostr. 1, 70839 Gerlingen, 

Germany 
Schmdz, Werner, pastor; Gabrielstr. 15, 72250 Freudenstadt, 

Germany 
Cramer, Andreas, pastor; Schomberger Str. 9, 72250 

Freudenstadt, Germany 
Leonhardt, Theo, pastor; Friedrich-STr. 69, 71032 Boblingen, 

Germany 
Eschmann, Holger, seminary lecturer; Bellinostr. 35, 72764 

Reudingen, Germany 
Ruckert, Harold, pastor; Steinburgstr. 89, 97080 Wuizburg, 

Germany 
Bildmann,Jurgen, pastor; Kapellenweg 14, 70771 

Leinfelden-Echterdingen, Germany 
Klix, Christian, pastor; Frauenstr. 83, 89073 Ulm, Germany 
Browa, Johannes, pastor; Leonbergerstr. 12, 71277 

Reutesheiva, Germany 
Waitzmann, Ludwig, pastor; Stadenstr. 60, 90491 Numberg, 

Germany 
Brodbeck, Gerhard, pastor; Keltenweg 1, 70839 Gerlingen, 

Germany 
Kohlhammer, Reiner, pastor; Rappenstr. 21, 72250 

Freudenstadt, Germany 
Braun, Reinhold, superintendent; Birkenwaldstr. 204, 70191 

Stuttgart, Germany 
Knoller, Horst, pastor; Friedensstr. 6, 73728 Esslingen, 

Germany 
Ruof Klaus U., pastor; Am Briel 43, 78467 Konstanz, 

Germany 

German Southwest (2) 

Sec. A Row 18 Seats 11-12 

Ade, Hans (2), university teacher; Curt-Goetz-Str. 95, 55127 

Mainz, Germany 
Kerscher, Horst (9), superintendent; Auer Strabe 20, 76227 

Karlsruhe, Germany 

Reserves 

Kettner, Hans-Peter, high school master; Humboldstrabe 5, 

75217 Birkenfeld, Germany 
Herrmann, Siegfried, teacher; Grenzweg 3, 76327 Pfinztal, 

Germany 
Schaarschmidt, Christian, attomey-at-law; Adelenstrabe 2, 

65929 Frankfurt, Germany 
Zucker, Walter, bank branch leader; Uhlandstrabe 30, 

75438 Knittlingen, Germany 
Pokropp, Horst, singing clerk; Briandstrabe 8, 76870 

Kandel, Germany 
Hensler, Gisela, conference chair of women's work; 

Maximilianstr. 28, 75172 Pforzheim, Germany 
Els, Albrecht, pastor; Elkenbachstr. 36, 60327 Frankfurt, 

Germany 
Wenner, Rosemarie; Steubenstrabe 71, 63225 Langen, 

Germany 
Vesen, Peter, pastor; Moltkestrabe 3, 76646 Bruchsal, 

Germany 



44 



DCA Advance Edition 



Schreiher, Gerhard, pastor; Ferdinand-Weib-Str. 72, 79106 

Freiburg, Germany 
Winkmann, Gunter, pastor; Wilhelm-Leuschner-Str. 8, 

60329 Frankfurt, Germany 
BoWinfried, pastor; Kurpfalzstrabe 55; 69226 Nubloch, 

Germany 

Great Britain (4) 

Sec. C Row 3 Seats 9-12 

Biggins, Moira (6), ITofScer; Methodist Homes, MHA, 

Epworth House Stuart Street,Derby DEI 2EQ,England, 
Muchopa, Naboth (1), secretary for racial justice; 1 Central 

Buildings, Westminster, London SWIH 9NH England, 
Beck, Brian E. (2), secretary of the British Methodist 

Conference; 25 Marylebone Road, NWl 5JR London, 

England 
Campbell Hyde, Catherine (10), superintendent of circuit; 46 

Western Avenue, Newport Gwent NP9 3SN, England 

Holston (16) 

Sec. D Row 7 Seats 1-8 
Row 8 Seats 1-8 

*Henderson, Jean (10), volunteer/homemaker; 3167 

Whipporwill Drive, NW, Cleveland TN 37312 
Scott, Zane (8), assistant attorney general; 152 Depot Street, 

Gate City, VA 24251 
Laycock, Evelyn (3), director SEJ Lay Ministry Center; 9-3 

Tri Vista Villas, Lake Junaluska, NC 28745 
Skeen, W.M. 'Bill' (9), engineer; 9748 Coebum Mountain 

Road, Wise, VA 24293 
Sikes, Scott (7) , student; P.O. Box 86, Galax, VA 24333 
Groseclose, Alan D. (4), attorney; P.O. Box 1440, Pulaski, 

VA 24301 
Tucker, Mary Frances (6) , business administrator; 1413 

Kenton Way, Knoxville, TN 37922 
Kinchaloe, Beatrice (1) , homemaker; 631 Fifth Street, 

Bristol, TN 37620 
Lippse, Charles E. (4), pastor; 1226 Watauga Street, 

Kingsport,TN 37660 
Bowles, Jr., Albert J.; (10), pastor, P.O. Box 1336, Johnson 

City TN 37605 
Howard,]. N. (9), pastor; 115 South Church Street, Marion, 

VA 24354 
Marchbanks, Paul Y. (6), pastor; P.O. Box 7078, Kingsport, 

TN 37664 
Blair, B. Ann (3), district superintendent; 3315 Berkshire 

Circle, Johnson City, TN 37604 
Austin, FredL. (2), district superintendent; P.O. Box 925, 

Wytheville,VA 24382 
Goodgame, Gordon C. (5), executive director SEJ 

Administrative Council; P.O. Box 67, Lake Junaluska, 

NC 28745 
Taylor, Mary Virginia (1), pastor; 6314 East Brainerd Road, 

Chattanooga, TN 37421 

Reserves 

McCartt, Jan, homemaker; 1708 Orchard Court, Kingsport, 

TN 37660 
Shufflebarger, Emmett G., retired educational consultant; 

206 Tenth Street, Radford, VA 24141 
Stames, Paul M., consultant; 4004 Patton Drive, 

Chattanooga, TN 37412 
Hicks-Caskey, W. Sue, diaconal minister; P.O. Box 1336, 

Johnson City, TN 37605-1336 



Lockaby, Bob, attorney; 7514 Island Manor Drive, Harrison, 

TN 37341 
Mills, Carl L, retired mechanical engineer; 7524 Huffaker 

Ferry Road, Knoxville, TN 37920 
Oliphant, George, retired Division Director Oak Ridge 

National Laboratories; 106 Wendover Circle, Oak Ridge, 

TN 37830 
Hutton, Lynn W., diaconal minister; 201 EastlTiird Street, 

KnoxviUe.TN 37917 
Fox, H. Eddie, World Evangelism Director World Methodist 

Council; 4491 Chandler Road, Hermitage, TN 37076 
Green, James R., pastor; 411 Belle Mead Drive, Maryville, 

TN 37803 
Rowlett,Jr., Peyton L; council director, P.O. Box 1178, 

Johnson City TN 37605 
Batch, William H, Pastoral Counseling Center Director; 

P.O. Box 11328, Knoxville, TN 37939-1328 
White, Raymon E., pastor; 6412 Mountain Laurel Road, 

Knoxville, TN 37924 
Baker, TedF, pastor; 3811 Redding Road, Chattanooga, TN 

37415 
Russell, Jerald W., pastor; 1228 Raulston Road, Maryville, 

TN 37801 
Edwards, P. Jackson, district superintendent; P.O. Box 1592, 

Morristown, TN 37816-1592 

Hungary Provisional (2) 

Sec. D Row 5 Seats 8-9 

Csemak, Eva (6), teacher, Szinhaz utca 6., H-4400 

Nyiregyhaza, Hungary 
Csemak, Istvan (6), pastor; Szinhaz utca 6., H-4400 

Nyiregyhaza, Hungary 

Reserves 

Schauermann, Henrik, engineer, Kedves utca 28., H-7628 

Pecs., Hungary 
Hecker, Frigyes, superintendent; Felso erdosor 5., H-1068 

Budapest, Hungary 

Iowa (22) 

Sec. D Row 3 Seats 1-12 
Row 4 Seats 1-10 

Mendenhall, Don W. (6), CCOM Director; 500 East Court, 

Suite C, Des Moines lA 50309 
Dawes, Inez (1), CCOM staff; 500 East Court, Suite C, Des 

Moines lA 50309 
Stephenson, Janet E. (7), annual conference secretary; 322 

Hickory Drive, Ames, lA 50014-3431 
Ridenour, Don (3), farmer;, Keswick, lA 50136 
Spencer, Beverly J. (6), homemaker/volunteer; R.R 2, West 

Branch, lA 52358 
Goldman, June P. (5), county supervisor; 24113 - 178th 

Street, Spirit Lake, lA 51630 
Nolte, Beverly M. (2), Intersharing administrator, VIM, 

4038 Morton, Des Moines L\ 50317 
Crawford, Avon (9) , teacher; 5108 Westwood Drive, West 

Des Moines, L\ 50265 
Meyer, Margaret E. (4), retired teacher; 4319 Brown Street, 

Davenport, lA 52806 
Kitterman, Sarah (8), student; 3606 Peters, Sioux City, lA 

51106 
Eberhart, Diane W. (10), diaconal minister; 6222 University, 

Des Moines, lA 50311 



Delegate Information 



45 



*Kiesey, Deborah L (8), pastor; P.O. Box 27, Mt. Pleasant, 

lA 52641 
Stout, David B. (10), pastor; 720 Grand Avenue, West Des 

Moines, lA 50265 
Ackerson, Merlin}. (1), pastor; 119 South Georgia, Mason 

City, lA 50401 
Peckham, Galen E. (4) , district superintendent; 500 East 

Court, Suite C, Des Moines lA 50309 
BurkhartJ. Robert (10), administrative assistant; 5(X) East 

Court, Suite C, Des Moines lA 50309 
Ward, Martha D. (3), pastor; P.O. Box 288, Knoxville, lA 

50138 
Kail, Edward A. (9), associate professor; 5123 Truman 

Road, Kansas City, MO 64127 
Smith, Tompsie K. (5), district superintendent; P.O. Box 

582, Creston, lA 50801 
Ough, Bruce R. (2), district superintendent; 225 First 

Avenue, SW, Cedar Rapids lA 52405 
Jayne, Carlos C. (6), pastor; 921 Pleasant Street, Des 

Moines, lA 50309 
Carver, Rebecca C. (7), Wesley Foundation; 2422 College 

Street, Cedar FaUs, lA 50613 

Reserves 

Lux, William E., poultryman; 101 Rays Court, Manchester, 

lA 52057 
Ireland, Jeffrey, lawyer; 6005 Walnut Hills Drive, Des 

Moines, lA 50312 
Webb, Jason, student; 1102 Burnett Avenue, Ames, lA 50010 
Ryon, Susan, volunteer; 1620 - 23rd Street, Fort Dodge, lA 

50501 
Daniels, Lillian M., retired Director of Nursing Services; 

2723 Avenue C, Fort Madison, lA 52627 
Petrak, Ruth Anne, executive director; 1507 Pennsylvania 

Avenue, Des Moines, lA 50316 
Oakland, Barbara L, volunteer; 2906 Bonnie Drive, 

Muscatine, lA 52761 
Wilcox, Timothy D., campus ministry; 2935 North 53rd 

Street, #4, Lincoln NE 68504 
Vogel, linda J., professor; 2121 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 

60201 
Grier, Dianne B., diaconal minister; 1207 Kimball, Waterloo, 

lA 50702 
Stanley, David, lawyer/investment manager; P.O. Box 209, 

Muscatine, lA 52761 
Daniel, Wesley S. K, CCOM staff; 500 East Court, Suite C, 

Des Moines lA 50309 
Dungan. Karen N., pastor; 805 Okoboji Avenue, Milford, lA 

51351-1643 
Olson, Richard L, Direcotr Church Growth & Revitali2ation; 

P.O. Box 484, Washington, lA 52353 
Anderson, Douglas/., pastor; 2900 - 49th Street, Des Moines, 

lA 50310 
Ward, Robert B., pastor; P.O. Box 288, Knoxville, lA 50138 
Willey, Larry G., pastor; 102 South Eighth, Estherville, lA 

51334 
Berbano,Jr., Mark (V.), pastor, 707 Sbcth Street, Grundy 

Center lA 50638 
Dass, Emmanuel R., pastor; 223 West Washington, 

Clarinda, lA 51632 
Oakland, Jerry E., district superintendent; 216 Sycamore, 

Suite 102, Muscatine lA 52761-3838 
Ampriester, Marvin D., pastor; 11 South First Street, 

Council Bluffs, lA 51503 
White, George A., pastor; 109 East 14th Street, Davenport, lA 

52803 



Kansas East (8) 

Sec. D Row 11 Seats 1-8 

Fooshee, Dale L. (2), council director; P.O. Box 4187, 

Topeka, KS 66604-0187 
Nelson, Betty J. (9), director of lay ministries; 4100 SW 

Munson, Topeka, KS 66604-1817 
Montgomery, DarleneT. (1), retired social worker; 5442 

SW 12th Terrace, #2, Topeka KS 66604-2347 
Livingston, David S. (7) , youth director; 5424 Westgate, 

Shawnee, KS 66216 
*Howell, H. Sharon (5), district superintendent; P.O. Box 

607, Ottawa, KS 66067-0607 
Dorsey, Frank L (6), pastor; 5400 West 75th Street, Prairie 

Village, KS 66208 
Tubach, Jerry A. (4), district superintendent; 6420 Santa Fe 

Drive, Overland Park, KS 66202 
Gardner, Andrew J. (10) , district superintendent; P.O. Box 

244, Parsons, KS 67357 

Reserves 

Atwood, Judy K., church and community worker; 1514 

Jarvis, Manhattan, KS 66502 
Hershberger, Jill S., teacher; 7054 Haskell, Kansas City. KS 

66109 
King, Ryann, student; 10803 West 96th Place, Overland 

Park, KS 66214 
Holliday, Jerry, engineer; R.R. 2, Box 163, Neodesha KS 

66757 
Brown, Eva K , chaplain; 914 SW Cambridge Avenue, 

Topeka, KS 66606 
Chun, Young-Ho, professor; 1121 SE 1 1th Street, Lee's 

Summit, MO 64081 
Darby, James E. , pastor; 5519 State Park Road, Shawnee ' 

Mission, KS 66205 
Stoneking, John £>., district superintendent; 4201 SW 15th 

Street, Topeka, KS 66604 

Kansas West (10) 

Sec. C Row 5 Seats 1-10 

*Schwab, Penney (6), adminisfrator; 1052 C Road, 

Copeland, KS 67837-9007 
Rose, Barbara J. (1), homemaker; 810 West 17th, 

Hutchinson, KS 67501 
McClellan, Jo Eva (3), homemaker; 807 Main, Box 248, 

Palco KS 67657 
Severance, Robert J. (8), retired Vo-Tch CEO; R.R. 2, Box 

65, Beloit KS 67420 
Scheer, Dennis H. (2), conference treasurer; 9440 East 

Boston, Suite 110, Wichita KS 67207 
Gordon, Tyrone T. (9), pastor; 1525 North Lorriane, Wichita, 

KS 67214 
Crickard, Elsie (4), pastor; 1600 West 27th North, Wichita, 

KS 67204-5005 
Reed, James R. (7), district superintendent; 620 East 30th, 

Suite 100, Hutchinson KS 67502 
Vogt.Jerold W. (10), district superintendent; 9440 East 

Boston, Suite 140, Wichita KS 67207 
Jones, Jon W. (5), pastor; 4407 East Douglas, Wichita, KS 

67218 

Reserves 

Walker, Robin A, student; 431 South Prospect, Clearwater, 

KS 67206 



46 



DCA Advance Edition 



West, Maria J., homemaker; R.R. 1, Box 38, Norcatur, KS 

67653 
Jant2en, Veraon G., insurance agent; P.O. Box 1118, 

Elkhart, KS 67950 
Robinson, Emmadell, banker; 2615 North Vasser, Wichita, 

KS 67220 
Sheldon, Barbara P., diaconal minister; 9440 East Boston, 

Suite 150, Wichita, KS 67207 
Conard, A. Mark, district superintendent; Pioneer Hall, 100 

East Claflin, Room 5 Salina, KS 67401 
Linn, Cheryl E., pastor; 208 East Central, Maize, KS 67101 
Iwig, James H., pastor; 1100 West 15th, Wichita, KS 67203 
Bowers, TroyL, pastor; Box 534, Abilene, KS 67410 
Bender, Kelly B., pastor; 330 North Broadway, Wichita, KS 

67202 

KentuclQ^ (8) 

Sec. D Row 1 Seats 9-12 
Row 2 Seats 9-12 

Jones, Dale (4), conference treasurer; P.O. Box 55440, 

Lexington, KY 40555 
Bowdan, Mel (10), college administrator; 2236 Clear Creek 

Road, Nicholasville, KY 40356 
Holsinger, Jim (5), medical center chancellor; 4705 

Waterside Court, Lexington, KY 40513 
Shepherd, Jim (8), attorney; P.O. Box 157, Perry Park, KY 

40363 
*Davis, Lindsey (3), district superintendent; 215 Catalpa 

Road, Lexington, KY 40502 
Seamands, David (1), retired professor; 63 Inlet Boulevard, 

Nokomis, PL 34275 
Gwinn, Al (6), pastor; 1094 Rockbridge Road, Lexington, 

KY 40515 
Brewer, Jackson (7), district superintendent; 906 Collins 

Road, Villa Hills, KY 41017 

Reserves 

Litton, Alice, businesswoman; 199 Elizaville Avenue, 

Flemingsburg, KY 41041 
Mitchell, Connie, teacher; 1705 Leestown Road, #418, 

Lexington KY,40511 
Turkington, Will, businessman; 3433 Oak Brook, 

Lexington, KY 40515 
Murphy, Jim, diaconal minister; 214 West High Street, 

Lexington, KY 40507 
Jennings, W. R., pastor; 707 Wicklow Road, Louisville, KY 

40207 
Jones, Donna, pastor; 1800 Louisville Road, Frankfort, KY 

40601 
Woodward, Sewell, district superintendent; 3000 Belhaven 

Drive, Russell, KY 41169 
Brady. Edgar, pastor; 1825 Russell Cave Road, Lexington, 

KY 40511 

little Rock (6) 

Sec. D Row 2 Seats 1-6 

*Loyd, Marilynn N. (4), real estate broker; P.O. Box 743, 

Lake Village, AR 71653 
Norton, Richard (1), state administrator; 6701 Highway 67, 

Benton, AR 72015 
Rice, Mattie M. (6), homemaker; 6412 Brentwood Road, 

Uttle Rock, AR 72207-2705 
Wilson, David B. (5), paston 1100 Central, Hot Springs, AR 

71901 



Jones, Chester R. (3), district superintendent; #1 

Longmeadow, Pine Bluff, AR 71603 
O'Dell, Paulette W. (10), pastor; 1300 East University, 

Magnolia, AR 71753 

Reserves 

Smith, Sandy, homemaker; 1525 Reed, Malvern, AR 72104 
Wynne, Margaret, homemaker; 1724 Abemathy, Fordyce, 

AR 71742 
Keahey, La Verne, diaconal minister; 138 ^ple Blossom 

Loop, Maumelle, AR 72113 
Connell, Gladwin, council director, 715 Center Street, #202, 

Uttle Rock AR,72201 
Burton, Jeanie P., district superintendent; 715 Center Street, 

#201, Uttle Rock AR,72201 
Bennett, Bruce W., pastor; P.O. Box 357, Sheridan, AR 72150 

Louisiana (12) 

Sec. B Row 1 Seats 1-12 

Crump, Anita (9), retired principal; 7321 Dalewood, New 

Orleans, LA 70126 
Stewart, Carl E. (8), circuit court judge; 300 Fannin Street, 

#2299, Shreveport LA,71101 
Loy, 0. F. (4), lobbyist P.O. Box 1546, Baton Rouge, LA 

70821 
Carruth, Nancy (4), financial management; P.O. Box 267, 

Bunkie, LA 71322 
White, Paul D. (5), realtor; 99 Woodlands Drive, Boyce, LA 

71409 
Dove, Carolyn (7), homemaker; 5945 Hickory Ridge, Baton 

Rouge, LA 70817 
* Simmons, Charles B. (10), pastor; 10230 Mollylea Drive, 

Baton Rouge, LA 70815 
Avery, Donald R. (2) , district superintendent; 2013 

MacArthur, Building 2, Alexandria, LA 71301 
Andrews, Christopher H. (3), pastor; 930 North Boulevard, 

Baton Rouge, LA 70802 
Cottrill, Donald C. (6), pastor; 360 Robert Road, Slidell, LA 

70458 
Peeples, William D. (1), pastor; 3715 Youree Drive, 

Shreveport LA 71105 
Cotton-Winn, Carole (5), district superintendent; 3401 Canal 

Street, New Orieans, LA 70119 

Reserves 

Kawasaki, Matt, ship designer; 1002 Michigan Avenue, 

SUdeU, LA 70458 
Callahan, Seoia, legal secretary; 1048 Cypress Creek Road, 

Oakdale, LA 71463 
Cobb, Pat, homemaker; 7117 Memphis Street, New 

Orleans, LA 70124 
Packer, Vera, financial consultant PO. Box 851, Slidell, LA 

70459 
Porter, John F., business owno", 236 Ashley, Shreveport LA 

71105 
Schoeffler, Sarah, professor; 3502 East Simcoe, Lafeyette, 

LA 70501 
Burgess, Robert L, pastor; 101 Uve Oak Boulevard, 

Lafayette, LA 70503 
Campbell, Alonzo J, pastor; P.O. Box 1174, SlideU, LA 70459 
Williams, Marie /'..pastor; 212 Broad, DeRidder, LA 70634 
Potter, Robert L, district superintendent P.O. Box 41188, 

Shreveport LA 71134-1188 
Campbell, Randall E., pastor, 2722 Louisiana Avenue, New 

Orleans, LA 70115 



Delegate Information 



47 



Boyd, TroyE., pastor; 201 John Wesley Boulevard, Bossier 
City, LA 71112 

Louisville (8) 

Sec. A Row 2 Seats 9-12 
Row 3 Seats 9-12 

Sowards, Charlotte M. (6), teacher; 400 Wesleyan Place, 

Owensboro.KY 42303 
Peters, Rhoda A. (9), council director; 1911 Hurstboume 

Court, Louisville, KY 40220 
Harman, Christine (1) , bank quality control officer; 1078 

Millcreek Drive, Henderson, KY 42420 
Dixon, J. D. (7), retired university staff; P.O. Box 117, 

Hawesville, KY 42346 
*Eblen, Thomas W. (10), pastor; 1305 South Main Street, 

Hopkinsville,KY 42240 
Brockwelljr., Charles W.\ (3), sseminary staff, 3907 

Ashridge Drive, Louisville KY 40241 
Grieb, Thomas B. (4), pastor; 201 East Fourth Street, 

Owensboro.KY 42303 
James, Rachel S. (8), pastor; 202 Burkesville Street, 

Columbia, KY 42728 

Reserves 

Wetzel, Nancy D., piano teacher; 2476 Hack Brown Road, 

Franklin, KY 42134 
Milton, Dorothy L., homemaker; 4907 Kay Avenue, 

Louisville, KY 40299 
Scott, Jack J., retired investments; 213 North Main, 

Elizabethtown, KY 42701 
Hutchinson, Larry R., warehouse manager, 31 Daytona 

Drive. Louisville, KY 40214 
Coins, Sr., Edgar S.; pastor, 318 West St Catherine, 

LouisvUleKY 40203 
Rankin, Donald E. , pastor; 800 Newman Way, Bowling 

Green, KY 42104 
Hill, Philip D., pastor; 503 Letcher Street, Henderson. KY 

42420 
Olds, J. Howard, pastor; 2000 Douglas Boulevard, Louisville, 

KY 40205 

Macedonia-Yugoslavia Provisional (2) 

Sec. C Row 11 Seats 11-12 

Trajkovski, Boris (1), lawyer; Finska 208, 91000 Skopje, 

Macdonia 
*Petreski, Kitan (3), district superintendent; Debarca 9, 

91000 Skopje, Macedonia 

Reserves 

Palik, Marija, secretary; Janka Gombara 24, YU-21211 

Kisac, Macedonia 
Palik-Kuncak, Ana, pastor; Janka Gombara 22, YU-21211 

Kisac, Macedonia 

Memphis (10) 

Sec. D Row 9 Seats 8-12 
Row 10 Seats 8-12 

*Archer, Anita K (5), church program director; 315 East 

Chester, Jackson, TN 38301 
Whitlow, Mark (4), accountant; 285 Cedar Lane, Paducah, 

KY 42001 



Peel, Dorothy (6), business owner; 6024 Ivawood, 

Memphis, TN 38134 
Stephenson, Roy (9), council associate director; 575 

Lambuth Boulevard, Jackson, TN 38301 
Carruth, Amanda (7), student; 4419 Sequoia, Memphis, TN 

38117 
Hilliard, David M. (3), district superintendent; 100 Fountain 

Avenue, #220, Paducah, KY 42001 
Blankenship, Paul F. (10), seminary staff; 168 East Parkway 

South, Memphis, TN 38104 
Hopson, Roger A. (1), district superintendent; P.O. Box 28. 

Paris, TN 38242 
Wheatley, Dossie F. (8), pastor; P.O. Box 452, Dyersburg, 

TN 38025 
Sharpe, Susan M. (2), pastor; P.O. Box 452, Dyersburg, TN 

38025 

Reserves 

Bond, R. H., retired; 231 Red Bond Road, Dyersburg, TN 

38024 
Hopson, Cyntha B., professor; P.O. Box 28, Paris, TN 38242 
Shelton III, Henry C., attorney; 1705 Grove Park Road, 

Memphis, TN 38117 
Adkins, Paula B.. housewife; 427 Tara Lane, Huntingdon, 

TN 38244 
Pevahouse, Joe N., pharmacist; 210 West Sixth Street, 

Henderson, TN 38340 
Clayton, Paul F., pastor; 315 East Chester, Jackson, TN 

38301 
Lynn, Shirley C, pastor; 300 Fountain Avenue, Paducah, KY 

42001 
Boone, Ben F., pastor; P.O. Box 25, Paris. TN 38242 
Ripski, Mike, pastor; 2949 Davis Plantation Road, Memphis, 

TN 38133 
Moorehead,J. Donald, district superintendent; P.O. Box 

11809, Memphis, TN 38111 

Middle Philippines (2) 

Sec. A Row 19 Seats 7-8 

Galang, Ernesto; San Antonio, Nueva Ecija, Philippines 
Magna, Catalino, pastor; 1518 Zamora Street, Tarlac, Tarlac 
2300 Philippines 

Reserves 

Calagui, Domingo; The United Methodist Church, Tarlac, 

Tarlac 2300 Philippines 
Manes, Johnson; Wesleyan University, Cabanatuan City 

3100, Philippines 

Mindanao Philippines (2) 

Sec. D Row 15 Seats 9-10 

Gagno, Reynaldo A. (3), election registrar; COMELEC 

Office. Isulan. Sultan Kudarat Philippines 
*Ladia, Roberto (1), community development person in 

mission; Spottswood Methodist Center, 9400 Kidapawan, 

Cotabato Philippines 

Reserves 

Pastores, Nimfa, government official; DAR, Celema's Place. 

9506 Koronadal South Cotabato.Philippines 
Nicolas, Efraim, government official; Caloocan, Koronadal, 

South Cotabato Philippines 



48 



DCA Advance Edition 



Agbisit, Andrea, dentist; Spottswood Methodist Center, 

Kidapawan, Cotabato Philippines 
Padua, Aida, accountant; Provincial Accounting Office, 

Koronadal, South Cotabato Philippines 
Agustin, Romeo, businessman; 414 Domingo Street, 

Koronadal, South Cotabato Philippines 
Rufino, Isabelo, businessman; San Emmanuel, Tacuring, 

Sultan Kudarat Philippines 
Abaya, Efren, businessman; Singer Marketing, Isulan, 

Sultan Kudarat Philippines 
Soriano, Dania, social worker; 104 Recto Street, 8000 Davao 

City, Philippines 
Ladia, Vinaflor, teacher; Spottswood Methodist Center, 

Kidapawan, Cotabato Philippines 
MamacAmelia, principal; Mapanao Compound; 9506 

Koronadal, South Cotabato, Philippines 
Garrett, Doris Ann, missionary; United Methodist Building, 

900 United Nations Avenue, Manila Philippines 
Flores, Anastacio, clerk of court; Clerk of Court Office, 

Tacurong, Sultan Kudarat Philippines 
Cabaltica, Romeo, retired government official; Midsaya, 

Cotabato 0410, Philippines 
Fajardo, Benjamin, retired judge; Tacurong, Sultan Kudarat, 

Philippines 
Aguayo, Leonardo, physician; Kidapawan, Cotabato, 

Philippines 
Arallano, Billy, pastor; The United Methodist Church, 

Katico, Sultan Kudarat Philippines 
Villanueva, Lima, district superintendent; Singer 

Marketing, Isulan, Sultan Kudarat Philippines 
Soriano, Leo, pastor; 104 Recto Street, 8000 Davao City, 

Philippines 
Exiomo, Edwin, pastor; The United Methodist Church, 9506 

Korondal, South Cotabato Philippines 
Rapisura, Manuel, district superintendent; 283 Kalaliman 

Street, 9506 Koronadal, South Cotabato Philippines 
Aoen, Job, pastor; The United Methodist Church, 

Blingkong, Latayan Sultan Kudarat,Philippines 
Dupitas, Benjamin, pastor; The United Methodist Church, 

Midsayap, Cotabato Philippines 
Daroy,Josue, pastor; The United Methodist Church, 

Surallah, South Cotabato Philippines 
Mella, Frank, district superintendent; 1353 Mercado Street, 

9407 Kabacan, Cotabato Philippines 
Marquez, Cesar, pastor; The United Methodist Church, 

I^tidtuan, Kabacan Cotabato,Philippines 
Miclat, Roberto, pastor; Spottswood Methodist Center, 

Kidapawan, Cotabato Philippines 
Miguel, Jose, pastor; The United Methodist Church, 

Naunama, Koronadal South Cotabato, Philippines 
Guzman, Noel, pastor; The United Methodist Church, 9402 

M'lang, Cotabato Philippines 
Ramos, Ernesto, Methodist Center director; Spottswood 

Methodist center, Kidapawan, Cotabato Philippines 
Wangawang, Noemi, professor; Union Theological 

Seminary, Palapala, Dasmarinas Cavite.Philippines 

Minnesota (12) 

Sec. C Row 7 Seats 1-12 

♦Williams, Aileen L (3), educator; 985 11 1/4 Street SW, 

Rochester, MN 55902 
Miller, Maynard L. (5), retired; R.R. 3, Box 3658, Slayton 

MN 56172 
Justice, Jean Fitch (10) , adult education coordinator; 10025 

Amsden Way, Eden Prairie, MN 55347 



Dowell, Jean (9), volunteer; 10360 Columbus Circle, 

Bloomington, MN 55420-5423 
Sitts, Jeff (4), student; Box 211, Elk River, MN 55330 
Thompson, Marjorie H. (6), homemaker; 1207 Cedar 

Avenue, Albert Lea, MN 56007 
Sarazin, Duane V. (3), district superintendent; 122 West 

Franklin Avenue, Room 400, Minneapolis MN 55404 
Mahle, Kathi Austin (5), pastor; 1514 Englewood Avenue, 

St. Paul, MN 55104 
Campbell, Rufus R. (1), pastor; 513 West Central Avenue, St. 

Paul, MN 55103 
Dundas, Charlie O. (2), pastor; 14770 Canada Avenue West, 

Rosemount, MN 55068 
Arnold, Kathy S. (10), pastor; 826 Stevens Circle, Park 

Rapids, MN 56470 
Toschak, Patricia Morton (8), pastor; 511 Groveland, 

Minneapolis, MN 55403 

Reserves 

Jensen, Irene Khin Khin, professor; 1666 Cofftnan, #216, St. 

Paul, MN 55108 
Ulja, Joan M., diaconal minister; 1468 Centennial Drive, 

RoseviUe, MN 55113 
Gates, Mary H., college admissions counselor; 3420 

Skycroft Circle, Minneapolis, MN 55418-1719 
Collins, Gary A., farmer/carpenter; Box 499, Pine Island, 

MN 55963 
Read, Riley R., retired consultant; 2968 Fumess, 

Maplewood, MN 55109 
Westby, Jeremy, student; P.O. Box 536, Winnebago, MN 

56098 
Mate, William T., pastor; 114 West Broadway, Winona, MN 

55987-6783 
Horst, Mark L, pastor; 3400 Park Avenue, Minneapolis, MN 

55407-2099 
Alexander, Dennis J., pastor; 5356- 30th Avenue South, 

Minneapolis, MN 55417 
Colescott, Ted G., pastor; 1411 South Maple Street, 

Northfield, MN 55057-2926 
Morey, Janet C, pastor; 33 Grove Street, Proctor, MN 55810 
Hargrave, Michelle M., pastor; 114 West Broadway, Wmona, 

MN 55987-6783 

Mississippi (18) 

Sec. A Row 6 Seats 1-6 
Row 7 Seats 1-6 
Row 8 Seats 1-6 

Morrison, Martha CTwack) (6), church volunteer/teacher; 

2617 Confederate, Vicksburg, MS 39180 
Lucas, Aubrey K (7) , university president; 3701 Jamestown 

Road, Hattiesburg, MS 39402 
McAiaiy, Stephen L. (2), UMSSM director; Box 2514, 

Tupelo, MS 38801 
Scott III, William D. (1), teacher; 566 Swaney Road, Holly 

Springs, MS 38635 
Pace, Kimberly R. (8), Methodist Hour; Box 16657, 

Hattiesburg, MS 39404 
Chatham, Betty J. (9), church volunteer/artist; Box MU, 

Mississippi State, MS 39762 
Rainwater, Dorothy (5), church volunteer/homemaker; 

3704 - 34th Avenue, Meridian, MS 39305 
Beckley, David L (4), college president; 150 East Rust 

Avenue, Holly Springs, MS 38635 
Boyd, Candi (3), student; Route 3, Box 598-B, Brookhaven, 

MS 39601 



Delegate Information 



49 



*Mays,Joe W. (5) , administrative assistant; Box 931, 

Jackson, MS 39205^931 
Goodpastor, Larry M. (10), pastor; Box 1706, Meridian, MS 

39302 
Case, John M. (3), pastor; 5116 Kaywood Circle, Jackson, 

MS 39211 
Knight, GaryH. (9), district suprintendent; Boo 629, 

Brookhaven, MS 39601 
Hillman, Byrd (4), pastor; Box 305, Philadelphia, MS 39350 
Younghlood, Rebecca C. (6), district superintendent; Box 

820286, Vicksburg, MS 39182 
Whiteside, Robert E. (2), pastor; 702 North Jackson, 

Starkville, MS 39759 
Conoway, Merlin D. (7) , district superintendent; Box 1329, 

Starkville, MS 39759 
Case, Martin A. (1), pastor; Box 797, Batesville, MS 38606 

Reserves 

Millsaps, Luther, church volunteer; Box 854, Tupelo, MS 

38801 
Barham, Michael P., local church staff; 3114 - 38th Street, 

Meridian, MS 39305 
Barnes, Thelma P., Delta Resources Center Director; 217 

Trilby, Greenville, MS 38701 
Terrell, Charles, diaconal minister; Box 1092, Jackson, MS 

39215-1092 
Youngblood, Ed, retired; Route 1, Box 106, Meadville, MS 

39658 
Thomas, Daniel M., veterinarian; Box 278, Forest, MS 39074 
Berry, George L, retired; 106 Peninsula, Leland, MS 38756 
LaBoone, Faye, church volunteer; Box 226, Quitman, MS 

39355 
Tindall, Mary C, church volunteer; 636 Woods Street 

Coldwater, MS 38618 
Morris, Sam 0., pastor; Box 1092, Jackson, MS 39215-1092 
Shelly, GussJ., district superintendent; Box 220, Senatobia, 

MS 38668 
Tonkel, D. Keith, pastor; Box 1121, Jackson, MS 39213 
Felder, Charles B., pastor; 23 Crossgates Drive, Brandon, 

MS 39042 
Henry, Earnest L, district superintendent; 1509 - 24th 

Avenue, Gulfport, MS 39501 
Gary, VickiL, pastor; Box 661, Magee, MS 39111 
Nicholson, Charles W., district superintendent; Box 1406, 

Ridgeland, MS 39159 
McDonald, Steven C, pastor; Box 600, Corinth, MS 38834 
Nabors,Jack M., district superintendent; Box 1199, 

Grenada, MS 38901 

Missouri East (10) 

Sec. B Row 2 Seats 1-5 
Row 3 Seats 1-5 

Greene, Daryle E. (2), retired animal scientist; 514 Webster 

Forest Drive, St Louis, MO 63119 
Ricks, Christian T. (3), state trooper; 704 Deer Creek, 

Jefferson City, MO 65109 
Paulsmeyer, Jason A. (1), college student Route 1, Box 49, 

Chamois, MO 65024 
Sykes, Roslyn K (7), professor; 957 Warder Avenue, St. 

Louis, MO 63130 
Smith, Carol A. (8), senior secretary; 301 Maplewood Drive, 

Columbia, MO 65203 
*Moncure,Jr., Rhymes H.; (6), district superintendent 870 

Woods Mill Drive, Suite 500, Ballwin, MO 63011 



Dunlap, Nancye K. (10), pastor; 6901 Washington, St. Louis, 

MO 63130 
Schenck, Carl L. (5), pastor; 204 South Ninth, Columbia, 

MO 65201 
Reese. William D. (9), pastor; P.O. Box 67, Eureka, MO 

63025 
Meyer, Mary Ellen (4) , district superintendent 810 Alta 

Vista, Cape Girardeau, MO 63701 

Reserves 

Blackwell, Shay, deaconess; 824 South Sappington, St 

Louis, MO 63126 
Williams, Jerry R., retired telephone company manager; 

1967 Willow Lake Drive, Chesterfield, MO 63017 
Frazee, Bill C, retired teacher; R.R 1, Box 140, Knox City, 

MO 63446 
Cloyd, Katie J., retired teacher; 202 Monroe Mill Drive, 

Ballwin, MO 63011-3316 
Parks, Arnold G., professor; 1521 Timber Trail, Jefferson 

City, MO 65109 
Stein, Neil L, pastor; 300 North Ellis, Cape Girardeau, MO 

63702 
Woods, Margie McDaniel, pastor; 901 Broadway, Hannibal, 

MO 63401 
Pyron, Marvin R., district superintendent 870 Woods Mill 

Drive, Suite 500, Ballwin, MO 63011 
Moon, Scofti4., pastor; 415 North Pacific, Cape Girardeau, 

MO 63701 
Webster, David M., pastor; 425 North Street Farmington, 

MO 63640 

Missouri West (10) 

Sec. D Row 16 Seats 1-10 

Gray, Jon R. (1), circuit judge; 2839 Benton Boulevard, 

Kansas City, MO 64128 
Ehlers, Don C. (10), diaconal minister; 549 West Fourth, 

Maryville, MO 64468 
Fenner, Elizabeth A. (6), retired; 514 South 13th, Lexington, 

MO 64067 
Admussen, Betty J. (8), retired; 5604 North Oaktree Lane, 

Kansas City, MO 64118 
Fagan, Larry R. (2), electrical contractor; 6533 Melody 

Court Parkville, MO 64152 
*Collier, Theodore C. (5), district superintendent 1512 Van 

Brunt Boulevard, Kansas City, MO 64127 
Weems,Jr., Lovett H.; (4), President Saint Paul School of 

Theology, 5123 Truman Road, Kansas City, MO 64127 
Casady, Robert L. (3), district superintendent 2921 North 

Bek Highway, L6, St Joseph, MO 64506 
Foockle, Harry F. (9) , pastor; 7310 NW Prairie View Road, 

Kansas City, MO 64151 
West, Brenda G. (7), district superintendent P.O. Box 883, 

Chilicothe, MO 64601 

Reserves 

Briggs, Margie M., administrative assistant 30911 South 

Grant Road, Creighton, MO 64739 
Scott, Ralph L, retired; 1401 Dierke Drive, Monett, MO 

65708 
Kerber, Joyce B., lawyer; 1020 NE Kenwood Drive, Lee's 

Summit, MO 64064 
Waller, L Glenn, securities advisor; 404 South Washington 

Street, Oregon, MO 64473 
Vigneaux, Randy W., machinist 4421 Oak Drive, Joplin, 

MO 64804 



50 



DCA Advance Edition 



Bryan, James J., pastor; 2747 East Sunshine, Springfield, 

MO 65804 
Browne, Amos, pastor; 8435 East 56th Terrace, Kansas City, 

MO 64129 
Cox, Stephen L, pastor; 2801 SW Walnut, Blue Springs, MO 

64015 
Nunnelee, M. Diane, pastor; 110 North 12th Street, St. 

Joseph, MO 64501 
Evans, Kyle B., pastor; 1209 Momingside Drive, Blue 

Springs, MO 64015 

Nebraska (10) 

Sec. C Row 14 Seats 1-10 

Vetter, Jeremy (1), student; 4510 Mohawk, Uncoln, NE 

68510 
Hasemeyer, Bill (3), retired college president; 301 Lakeview 

Boulevard, North Platte, NE 69101 
Trumble, BetteT. (5), software distributor; 12400 Buffalo 

Road, Springfeild, NE 68059 
Urbom, Warren (7), federal judge; 4421 Ridgeview Drive, 

Lincoln, NE 68516 
Watson, Tom (8), attorney; 3 Sycamore Place, Kearney, NE 

68847 
*Bevins, C. Rex (5), pastor; P.O. Box 83068, Lincoln, NE 

68501 
Turner, Richard D. (6), conference executive director od 

ministries; Box 4553, Lincoln, NE 68504 
Abram, Charlotte (9), pastor; P.O. Box 3167, Omaha, NE 

68103 
Rathod, Samuel R. (10), district superintendent; 207 North 

Pine, #106, Grand Island, NE 68801 
Davies, Susan P. (4), district superintendent; 1101 Riverside 

Boulevard, #1, Norfolk, NE 68701 

Reserves 

Williams, Idalene, accountant; 11010 Laurel, Omaha, NE 

68104 
Reed, Charlotte, retired; 83726 - 554th Avenue, Norfolk, NE 

68701 
Berck, Jan, farmwife; Box 40, Greham, NE 68367 
Hall, Darlene, insurance sales; 3010 Avenue C, Scottsbluff, 

NE 69361 
Brewer, Scott, student; 4030 Loveland, Lincob, NE 68506 
Todd, Steve, pastor; 1401 Lake, Gothenburg, NE 69138 
Black, Sr., Aaron D.; pastor, 2723 North 50th, Lincoln, NE 

68504 
Croom, Ronald, pastor; 815 North Broad, Fremont, NE 

68025 
Waters, Carolyn, district superintendent; 729 West Court, 

Beatrice, NE 68310 
Alloway, Wayne, pastor; Box 310, Shelton, NE 68876 

New England (14) 

Sec. D Row 9 Seats 1-7 
Row 10 Seats 1-7 

Lee, Kum (9), homemaker; 188 State Road, Eliot, ME 03903 
Sweet, Elizabeth A. (6), executive director; 32 Baker Street, 

Reading, MA 01887-1812 
Parker, Joe (6), mechanical drafting designer; 158 

Woodstock Road, East Woodstock, CT 06244 
Edgerly, Cynthia (8) , parent aide; 48 Lovell Street, 

Rochester, NH 03887 
Gross, Richard F. (3), college admissions director; 51 

Googin Street, Lewiston, ME 04240 



McMahan, Dorothy S. (5), retired teacher; R.R 1, Box 

131B, Penobscot, ME 04476 
Grain, Dight W. (4), food manufacturer; 10 Clover Lane, 

Natick, MA 01760 
*Woods, Vicki (10), district superintendent; 211 West 

Broadway, Bangor, ME 04401 
Del Pino, Jerome K. (2), district superintendent; 53 

Birchwood Drive, Holden, MA 01520 
Tan, Wee-Li (10), pastor; 5 Damon Street, Wayland, MA 

01778 
Williams, Wesley (1), coordinator for urban strategy; 566 

Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 
Campbell-Marshall, Linda (1), district superintendent; 

Route 2, Box 5778, Union, ME 04862 
Morrison, Susan (3), pastor; 2600 Massachusetts Avenue, 

Lexington, MA 02173 
Gulinello, Frank (7), pastor; 258 Mammoth Road, 

Londonderry, NH 03053 

Reserves 

Wiborg, Margaret, university faculty; 36 Fessenden Street, 

Newton, MA 02126 
Gushing, Regina, secretary; 12 Whalen Drive, Lincoln, RI 

02865 
Susag, Philip, retired engineer; 46 Adelaide Road, 

Manchester, CT 06040 
Taylor, Lois, artist/retired teacher; 808 South Main Street, 

Centerville, MA 02632 
Wyatt, Mary, retired parole officer; Stillwater Bridge Road, 

South Deerfield, MA 01373 
Peak, Diane, conference benefits coordinator; 566 

Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215-2501 
Hughen, Richard, retail store manager; 65 Dawson Street, 

South Portland, ME 04106 
Mott, Stephen C, pastor; 517 West Center Street, West 

Bridgewater, MA 02379 
Sweet, Robert, pastor; 6 Salem Street, Reading, MA 01867 
Torres, Ulises, pastor; 2 Vernon Street, Fitchburg, MA 01420 
Purushotham, Gwen, district superintendent; 385 Sowans 

Road, Barrington, RI 02806 
Luke, Jr., Wendell; district superintendent, 566 

Commonwealth, Boston, MA 02215-2501 
Josselyn, Lynne, pastor; 8 Prospect Street, Caribou, ME 04736 
Hamilton, Richard M., pastor; 12 College Avenue, Gorham, 

ME 04038 

New Mexico (4) 

Sec. C Row 4 Seats 9-12 

*Sager, Stan (5), attorney; 6000 Hermanos, NE, 

Albuquerque, NM 87111 
Goodwin, Dick (3), retired; 1510 South Lea, Roswell, NM 

88201 
Hutchinson, William (10), pastor; 1615 Copper, NE, 

Albuquerque, NM 87106 
Crutchfield, Charles (4), district superintendent; 6401 Belton 

Road, El Paso, TX 79912 

Reserves 

Roberts, Sandra Kams, homemaker; 3119 LaRonda Place, 

NE, Albuquerque NM,87110 
Smith, Rodney, project engineer; 3413 Sands, El Paso, TX 

79904 
Stanfield, Clyde, pastor; P.O. Box 1638, Albuquerque, NM 

87103 



Delegate Information 



51 



Spence, Elizabeth Lopez, pastor; 1601 East 42nd Street, 
Odessa, TX 79762 

New York (16) 

Sec. A Row 4 Seats 1-8 
Row 5 Seats 1-8 

*Swiggett, Ernest L (4), conference treasurer; 252 Bryant 

Avenue, White Plains, NY 10605 
Parris, Shirley (9), retired A.V.P. human resources; 1136 

Bergen Street, Brooklyn, NY 11216-3302 
Ingram, Betsy (3), NYNEX Operator Services; 25 Millstone 

Lane, Southampton, NY 11968 
Capen, Beth (1), lawyer; 23 Rogers Street, Kingston, NY 

12401-6049 
Nicodemus, Richard (2), retired educator; 165 Rochdale 

Road, Poughkeepsie, NY 12603 
Fowlkes, Nancy (6), social worker; 107 Valley Road, White 

Plains, NY 10604 
Day, Inday (5), freelance communicator; 544 North Salem 

Road, Ridgefield,CT 06877 
Adams, Freda L (10), retired hospital administrator; 2541 

Seventh Avenue, #10D, New York NY,10039 
MiddletonJaneA. (5), pastor; 165 South Avenue, New 

Canaan, CT 06840 
Day, R. Randy (1), pastor; 207 Main Street, Ridgefield, CT 

06877 
Miller, Clayton Z. (10), council director; 252 Bryant Avenue, 

White Plains, NY 10605 
Nugent, Jr., Randolph W.; (2), General Secretary, General 

Board of Global Ministries, 475 Riverside Drive, Room 

1400, NewYork, NY 10115 
Carrington, John E. (4), Church City Society Executive 

Director; 50 Ralph Road, New Rochelle, NY 10204 
Henderson, Dolores H. (8) , pastor; 163 South Long Beach 

Avenue, Freeport, NY 11520 
Parker, Richard S. (6) , pastor; 1515 Middle Neck Road, Port 

Washington, NY 11050 
Rivera, Eli S. (J), Cross-Conference Hispanic Ministries; 

475 Riverside Drive, 3rd Floor, New York, NY 10115 

Reserves 

Ruggiero, John, retired educator; Box 517, East Moriches, 

NY 11940 
Kirkwood, William C, retired insurance broker; 42 

Washington Avenue, Garden City, NY 11530 
Engelhardt, Carolyn H., diaconal minister; 205 Academy 

Road, Cheshire, CT 06410 
Dockery, Lucille, homemaker; 5 Hill and Hollow Road, 

Hyde Park, NY 12538-2919 
Hood, Andrea, student; 12 Lafayette Avenue, Coxsackie, NY 

12051 
Hunsinger, Robert G., account manager; 63 Pickerel Road, 

Monroe, NY 10950 
Lyman, Mary Grace, General Agency Staff; 15 Washington 

Place, Northport, NY 11768 
Edwards, Barbara J., microbiologist; 139-28 - 230 Place, 

Laurelton, NY 11413 
Riss, Timothy J., pastor; 35 Woodland Avenue, Catskill, NY 

12414 
Ishii, Takayuki, pastor; 201 West 13th Street, New York, NY 

10011-7701 
Collins, John A, pastor; 65 Rockland Place, New Rochelle, 

NY 10801 
Brooks, Gennifer, pastor; 4801 Foster Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 

11203 



Kimmelman, Linda S., district superintendent; 14 Babnville 

Lane, Newburgh, NY 12550 
McClain, George D. , MFSA Executive Director; 76 Clinton 

Avenue, Staten Island. NY 10301 
Home, Edward C, pastor; 550 West End Avenue, New York, 

NY 10024 
Caldwell, Gilbert H, pastor; 239 West 139th Street, New 

York, NY 10030 

North Alabama (14) 

Sec. A Row 4 Seats 9-12 
Row 5 Seats 9-12 
Row 6 Seats 9-12 

Moore, Frances H. (3), educator; 711 Stonevrall Drive, 

Birmingham, AL 35210 
Berte, Neal R. (7) , college president; 816 - 8th Avenue West, 

Birmingham, AL 35204 
Hamrick, Leon (2), surgeon; 3656 Rockhill Road, 

Birmingham, AL 35223 
Stewart, Mollie M. (4), quality assurance manager; P.O. 

Box 130, Valhermoso Springs, AL 35775 
Stabler, Monty (9) , art gallery owner; 3538 Victoria Road, 

Birmingham, AL 35223 
Self, Eddie (5), CPA; P.O. Box 1212, Decatur, AL 35601 
Holt, Gloria (1) , homemaker; 923 Wiunchester Circle, 

Birmingham, AL 35235 
*York, Billy L (10), pastor; P.O. Box 19069. Birmingham, 

AL 35219 
Anderson, Barry H. (3), pastor; 415 North Seminary Street, 

Florence. AL 35630 
Hearin, Gerry M. (5). district superintendent; 8705 Camille 

Drive. Huntsville. AL 35802 
West, Jr., J. Pete 0, 9; district superintendent, 104 Gwindale 

Road, Gadsden, AL 35901 
Clem, Kelly A. (6), pastor; 201 Montview, Piedmont, AL 

36272 
Ward, Gary T. (4), pastor; 109 Weatherly Road, Huntsville, 

AL 35803 
Lee, Charles H. (8), pastor; 5191 Caldwell Mill Road, 

Birmingham. AL 35244 

Reserves 

Weems. Stanley, retired; 11302 Woodcrest Drive. 

Huntsville. AL 35803 
Meadows. Pat. assistant U.S. attorney; 1003 Rime Village, 

Hoover. AL 35216 
OToole, Jr., Ed; engineer business, P.O. Box 25, 

Pahnerdale,AL 35123 
Crane, Charles W., retired engineer; 1314 - 13th Street, 

Pleasant Grove, AL 35127 
Howard, Charles E., retired government employee; 1708 

Sandra Street, SW, Decatur, AL 35601 
Feist, Caroline, physician; 216 Monterey Circle, Gadsden, 

AL 35901 
Selman. Scott, conference treasurer; 898 Arkadelphia Road. 

Birmingham, AL 35204 
Leverett, H. Robert, district superintendent; 709 South 

Norton Avenue, Sylacauga, AL 35150 
Morgan, T. Michael, pastor; P.O. Box 20150, Birmingham, 

AL 35216 
Etherton, RayfordL, Homes Superintendent; 898 

Arkadelphia Road, Birmingham. AL 35204 
Wallace, David S., district superintendent; 421 North 

Seminary Street, Florence, AL 35630 



52 



DCA Advance Edition 



Parris, Mark D., pastor; 5669 Morris Avenue, Hokes Bluff, 

AL 35903 
Sparkmanjr., Robert (H.), pastor, P.O. Drawer J, Arab, AL 

35016 
Harper, Barbara E., district superintendent; 2826 - 14th 

Street East, Tuscaloosa, AL 35404 

North Arkansas (8) 

Sec. A Row 18 Seats 1-8 

Lane, James Qim) W. (3), retired U.S. Government; 508 

Brent Drive, Sherwood, AR 72116 
Arnold, Jr., W. E. (Buddy) (5), retired U.S. Government, 

3712 Pope Avenue, North little Rock, AR 72116 
Baker, Lynn R. (1), non-profit director; 811 Lauderdale 

Road, Blytheville, AR 72315 
Quick, Jeff (4), youth director; 6701 John F. Kennedy 

Boulevard, North Uttle Rock, AR 72116 
*Whitfield, D. Max (6), district superintendent; P.O. Box 

2415, Batesville, AR 72503 
Hathcock, Philip L. (10), pastor; 1610 Prince Street, Conway, 

AR 72032 
Moyer, Bonda D. (9), district superintendent; P.O. Box 1139, 

Forrest City, AR 72335 
HolifieldJ. Anthony (7), pastor; P.O. Box 1106, Fayetteville, 

AR 72702 

Reserves 

Gregory, Terry P., teacher; P.O. Box 532, Augusta, GA 

72006 
Goss, Nettie J., retired nurse; HI Sunset Lane, North Litde 

Rock, AR 72118 
Cook, M. Olin, college administrator; 266 South Enid Street, 

RussellviUe, AR 72801 
Oliver, Les, diaconal minister; 201 N.W. Second Street, 

Bentonville, AR 72712 
Mollis, C. Waymon, council director; 715 Center Street, Litde 

Rock, AR 72201 
Steele, Rodney G., pastor; 1604 Pointer Trail, Van Buren, AR 

72956 
Spence, Dennis, pastor; P.O. Box 535, Clarksville, AR 72830 
Webb, Marilyn F., pastor; P.O. Box 107, Eureka Springs, AR 

72632 

North CaroUna (18) 

Sec. B Row 5 Seats 1-9 
Row 6 Seats 1-9 

*Evans, Jr., Cashar W.; (4), real estate broker, 69 Poteskeet 

Trail, Kitty Hawk, NC 27949 
Norris, J. Allen (7), conference treasurer; P.O. Box 10955, 

Raleigh, NC 27605 
Workman, Anna G. (5), Christian Education director; 2114 

US 70, Mebane, NC 27302 
Dillon, C. A (1) , supply company chairman; 925 Vance 

Street, Raleigh, NC 27628-6096 
Balentine, Becky (9), Director of Evangelism; 1416 Granada 

Drive, Raleigh, NC 27628-6096 
Henderson, Gwen C. (8), university staff; P.O. Box 606, 

Fayetteville, NC 28302-0606 
Johnson, Jane H. (6), retired educator; 856 KnoUwood Falls 

Road, Mebane, NC 27302 
Frazier, Sr., Robert C; (3), professor, 215 Grace Drive, 

Wilson NC 27893 
Huckaby, Jr., Robert L; (10), diaconal minister, 6612 

Creedmore Road, Raleigh NC 27613 



Braswell, KermitL. (4), district superintendent; P.O. Box 

10955, Raleigh, NC 27605 
Holtsclaw, Thomas G. (3), district superintendent; 1503 

Kimberly Road, New Bern, NC 28562 
Presnell, William M. (9), district superintendent; Box 1662, 

312 South Griffin Street, Elizabeth City, NC 27906 
Banks, David A (1), pastor; 111 Hodges Street, Morehead 

City, NC 28557 
Farmer, Penny Dollar (8), pastor; Route 65, Box 80-A, 

Arapahoe, NC 28510 
Joyner,Jr., F. Belton; (10), administrative assistant, P.O. Box 

10955, Raleigh, NC 27605^955 
Shuler, Albert (6), district superintendent; 1002 West Knox 

Street, Durham, NC 27701 
Wynn, Samuel (5), pastor; 3821 Madison Avenue, 

Fayetteville, NC 28304 
Shaw, Jr., Caswell (E.), 2; pastor, 100 South Church Street, 

Rocky Mount, NC 27804 

Reserves 

Norton, Wilbum (Bill) L, council staff; P.O. Box 10955, 

Raleigh, NC 27605 
Rouse, Jeanne, administrative assistant; P.O. Box 1588, 1304 

West Church Street, Laurinburg, NC 28353 
Cummings, Mabel M., homemaker; Route 3, Box 198-B, 

Maxton, NC 28364 
little, Laura J., home economist; 217 King George Road, 

Greenville, NC 27858 
Walden, Thomas L, retired; 8333 Zebulon Road, 

Youngsville, NC 27596 
Wall, James Randy, student; 2163 Boonesneck Road, SW, 

Supply, NC 28462 
Barker, Gary C, realtor; Drawer D, New Bern, NC 28563 
Barrett, Robbie W., administrative secretary; 104 Twin Oaks 

Place, Gary, NC 27511 
Roberts, Tibbie, retired; P.O. Box 3471, Morehead City, NC 

28557 
Ward, Hope M, pastor; 12837 Norwood Road, Raleigh, NC 

27613 
Harper, Ruth E., district superintendent; 2201 Lynnwood 

Drive, Wilmington, NC 28403 
Goehring, Carol W., pastor; 208 Cypress Avenue, 

Wrightsville Beach, NC 28480 
Ponder, Reginald W., retirement home president; P.O. Box 

52549, Durham, NC 27717 
Elliott, Roger V., pastor; 228 West Edenton Street, Raleigh, 

NC 27603 
Cleaves, Edith L, pator; 4705 Old Chapel Hill Road, 

Durham, NC 27707 
Leeland, Paul L. , pastor; 2916 Wicker Street, Sanford, NC 

27330 
Campbell, Dennis M. , Duke Divinity School Dean; Box 

90968, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 
Lowry, Jerry, pastor; 1300 Seaside Road, SW, Sunset Beach, 

NC 28468 

North Central New York (10) 

Sec. D Row 12 Seats 1-10 

*Neese, Betty (9), retired; 24 Charles Street, Auburn, NY 

13021 
Bretsch, Ronald (6), professor; 7 Elm Street, Norwood, NY 

13668 
Salyer, Ronald (4), Conference DAS/T; P.O. Box 1515, 

Cicero, NY 13039 
Barden, Kathleen B. (3), diaconal minister; 118 Gertrude 

Street, North Syracuse, NY 13212 



Delegate Information 



53 



Duger, Sharon L. (1), Resource Center Director; R.R. 2, Box 

479A, Little Canada Road, Central Square, NY 13036 
Pritts, Deborah L (10), district superintendent; P.O. Box 

236, Homer, NY 13077 
Deckard, Stephen T. (5), pastor; Box 158, Fayetteville, NY 

1306^0158 
Benham, Beth 0. (2), pastor; 32 North Street, Marcellus, NY 

13108 
O'Connor-Slater, Deborah L (8), pastor; 604 Oswego Street, 

Uverpool, NY 13088 
Wolfe, Thomas V. (7), professor; 302 Berkeley Drive, 

Syracuse, NY 13210 

Reserves 

Burlew, Elizabeth J., parish worker; 4873 Candy Lane, 

ManUus, NY 13104 
Tuttle, Joellyn W., diaconal minister; 811 North Cayuga 

Street, Ithaca, NY 14850 
Jelinek, Robert V., retired; 6332 Ledgewood Drive, 

JamesviUe, NY 13078 
Elliott, Ruth F., parish worker; 1 Acker Road, Horseheads, 

NY 14845 
Finlayson-Schuler, Ted, public transportation safety; 612 

Summit Avenue, Syracuse, NY 13207 
Devadhar, Sudarshana, pastor; 41 Court Street, Canton, NY 

13617 
Stevens, Carrie F., conference council; P.O. Box 1515, 

Cicero, NY 13039 
Hall, Russell C, pastor; 350 Nottingham Road, Syracuse, NY 

13210 
Hill, Robert, pastor; 1050 East Avenue, Rochester, NY 14607 
Jelinek, Patricia B., pastor; P.O. Box 277, Jamesville, NY 

13078 

North Georgia (24) 

Sec. B Row 16 Seats 1-12 
Row 17 Seats 1-12 

Ervin, Jr., Paul R. (3), executive vice-president, 3635 Oak 

Lane, Marietta, GA 30062 
Whittemore, Joe M. (5), certified public accountant; P.O. 

Box 770, Hartwell, GA 30643 
Paul, Doris B. (6), attorney; 751 Channing Drive NW, 

Atlanta, GA 30318-2504 
Day, Barbara (10), diaconal minister; 775 Powder Horn, 

Atlanta, GA 30342 
Yohan, Shantilata R. F. (6), retired professor; 4028 Sue 

Lane, Decatur, GA 30035 
Knight, Margaret F. (1), office manager; 521 England 

Chapel Road, Jenkinsburg, GA 30234 
Bobo, Jr., Hiram, 5; retired, 6747 Tilton Lane, Doraville, GA 

30360 
Perry, Rubin (4), business owner; 3760 Loch Highland 

Parkway, Roswell, GA 30075 
England, Stan B. (8), Methodist Hour; 537 Shiloh Road, 

Kennesaw,GA 30144 
Cook, Beth L (2), diaconal minister; 2645 Regency Drive 

West, Tucker, GA 30084 
Kilpatrick, Joe W. (9), certified public accountant; 1476 

Drayton Woods Drive, Tucker, GA 30084 
Calvert, Jr., Robert (A.), 7; management consultant, 710 

Marshview Close, Roswell, GA 30076 
*Dodson, E. Malone (3), pastor; 814 Mimosa Boulevard, 

Roswell, GA 30075 
Thompson, James N. (4), district superintendent; 159 Ralph 

McGill Boulevard NE, #204, AUanta, GA 30308 



Forrest, Martha H. (7), pastor; 1016 East Rock Springs Road 

NE, Atlanta, GA 30306 
Wilder, Gamett M. (10), pastor; P.O. Box 1109, Athens, GA 

30602 
Crawford, Sr., Joseph (L), 6; district superintendent, 159 

Ralph McGill Boulevard NE, #514 AUanta, GA 30308 
Morris, Carolyn W. (10) , district superintendent; 855 Sunset 

Drive, Jefferson Professional Park, A-2 Athens,GA 30606 
Brantley, Douglas 'Mac' (3), district superintendent; P.O. 

Box 1064, Dalton, GA 30722 
Sheets, Herchel S. (9), administrative assistant; 159 Ralph 

McGill Boulevard NE, #512, Atlanta, GA 30308 
Baker, Jr, Rudolph (R.), 5; council director, 159 Ralph 

McGill Boulevard NE, #106 Atlanta, GA 30308 
Mooneyhan, James B. (1), pastor; 2428 Main Street, 

SnellviUe, GA 30278 
Hollins, McCallister (2), pastor; 2099 Fairbum Road, 

Atlanta, GA 30331 
Henderson, Cornelius L. (8), seminary president; 145 

Benson Circle, Fairbum, GA 30213 

Reserves 

Dinkins, Jo J., conference pension officer; 1854 Joppa Lane, 

Tucker, GA 30084 
Williamson, Richard 'Dick', business owner; 5167 Indian 

Circle, Gainesville, GA 30506 
Jones, Ida F. T., retired teacher; 714 Pyracantha Drive, 

LaGrange,GA 30240 
Sikes, Marget H., homemaker; 205 Jordan Street, Tunnel 

Hill, GA 30755 
Darko, Morrell J., retired teacher; P.O. Box 6108, Rome, GA 

30162-6108 
Gustafson, Gus M. 0., retired; 212 Larcom Lane, Griffin, GA 

30223 
Ellison, Betty G., business owner; 4058 Ayers Drive, 

Kennesaw,GA 30144 
Drewry, Virginia P., volunteer; 6640 Williamson Drive NE, 

Atlanta, GA 30328 
Bryson, Claudette S., retired nurse; 326 Ross Street, Rome, 

GA 30161 
Smith, Bucky, account executive; 1900 Battlefield Drive, 

Marietta, GA 30064 
Marlowe, Deborah A., attorney; 782 Courtenay Drive NE, 

Atlanta, GA 30306 
Johnson, Norman R., retired; 668 Church Street NW, 

AUanta, GA 30318^241 
DeMore, Philip D. , pastor; 2780 Thompson Bridge Road, 

GainesviUe,GA 30506 
Tomlinson, K. Edward, district superintendent; 700 East 

Second Avenue, Suite D, Rome, GA 30161 
Brooks, Jane N., pastor; P.O. Box 87, WaUdnsville, GA 30677 
Sineath, Charles A., pastor; 56 WhiUock Avenue, Marietta, 

GA 30064 
Holston, L. Jonathan, associate council staff; 159 Ralph 

McGill Boulevard NE, AUanta, GA 30308 
Hinton.Jr., Coy (H), pastor, 3185 Wheeler Road, Augusta, 

GA 30909 
Caywood, Larry B., pastor; 401 Broad Street, LaGrange, GA 

30240 
Peabody.Joe P., district superintendent; 343 Northside 

Drive, Gainesville, GA 30501 
Westmoreland, Mark A., Wesleyan Christian Advocate 

editor; 2698 Colony Circle, Snellville, GA 30278 
LaGree, Kevin R., seminary dean; 202 Bishops Hall, Emory 

University, AUanta, GA 30322 
Lathem, Warren R., pastor; 9820 Nesbit Ferry Road, 

Alpharetta.GA 30202 



54 



DCA Advance Edition 



Kimbrough, Walter L, pastor; 4340 Pompey Drive SW, 
Atlanta, GA 30331 

North Indiana (14) 

Sec. A Row 7 Seats 7-12 
Row 8 Seats 7-12 
Row 9 Seats 11-12 

Alter, Dixie A. (3), sales representative; 5002 Tacoma 

Avenue, Fort Wayne, IN 46807 
Goldschmidt, Victor W. (5) , professor; 6617 State Road 

26W, West Lafayette, IN 47906 
Johnson, Carolyn E. (6), university researcher; 2550 Yeager 

Road, 19-2, West Lafayette, IN 47906 
Shettle, John T. (2), hospital security; Box 155, Orestes, IN 

46063 
Ottjes, Jim H. (4), plumbing; heating and electrical 

contractor, P.O. Box 115, Uniondale, IN 46791 
Morgan, Sharie (10), assistant to pastor; 5008 Gettysburg 

Drive, Kokomo, IN 46902 
Hefley, Chuck E. (1), educator; 4839 North Parkway, 

Kokomo, IN 46901 
*Coyner, Michael J. (1), administrative assistant; 1100 West 

42nd Street, Indianapolis, IN 46208 
Lehman, Katharine (10), district superintendent; 901 West 

Lindberg Road, West Lafayette, IN 47906 
Williams, Jr., Jacob (C), 7; district superintendent, P.O. Box 

508, nil West Second Street Marion, IN 46952 
Reynolds, Cynthia (9), district superintendent; 3 Stoneridge 

Drive, Huntington, IN 46750 
Case, Riley (8), pastor; 700 Southway Boulevard East, 

Kokomo, IN 46902 
Granger, Philip R. (3), district superintendent; 2936 Bagley 

Drive West, Kokomo, IN 46902 
Witwer, Brian (5), pastor; 2417 Getz Road, Fort Wayne, IN 

46804 

Reserves 

Weeks, Patricia M., counselor; 1024 Marleton Road, 

Logansport, IN 46947 
Baszner, Rob; 514 Rudgate Lane, Kokomo, IN 46901 
Fenstermacher, Anita; 1905 Famsworth Drive, South Bend, 

IN 46614 
Olson-Bunnell, Heather L, diaconal minister; P.O. Box 387, 

Roanoke, IN 46783 
Morgan, Willie E., retired; 938 North Niles Avenue, South 

Bend, IN 46617 
Rogers, Lois, diaconal minister; 937 River Drive, Hammond, 

IN 46324 
Stone, Ruth Ellen, conference staff, 403 West Ellsworth, 

Columbia City, IN 46725 
Johnson, Charles I., pastor; 2800 Rockford Lane, Kokomo, 

IN 46902 
Fenstermacher, Mark, pastor; 630 Lincoln Highway, New 

Haven, IN 46774 
Jones, James J., district superintendent; 9430 lima Road, 

Suite B, Fort Wayne IN,46818 
Beard, Frank, pastor; P.O. Box 1933, 1501 Morehouse, 

Elkhart IN,46515 
Arnold, Paul J, pastor; 7320 Northcote Avenue, Hammond, 

IN 46324 
Caruso, George, pastor; 530 Guilford Street, Huntington, IN 

46750 
Buwalda,Jr., Herb J.; pastor, 1968 West Main, Muncie, IN 

47303 



North Shaba (16) 

Sec. A Row 11 Seats 1-8 
Row 12 Seats 1-8 

Kimba, Kasongo (3), handicapped school director; The 

United Methodist Church, P.O. Box 11.237, Chingola, 

Zambia 
Ilunga, Kaseya (1) , doctor; The United Methodist Church, 

P.O. Box 11.237, Chingola, Zambia 
Kafimbo, Shimbi (5), nurse; The United Methodist Church, 

P.O. Box 11.237, Chingola, Zambia, 
Ngoy, Kazadi (2), businessman; The United Methodist 

Church, P. 0. Box 11.237. Chingola, Zambia 
Wata, Kongolo (9), Methodist Men President; The United 

Methodist Church, P.O. Box 11.237, Chingola, Zambia 
Mukala, Musenge (10), businessman; The United 

Methodist Church, P.O. Box 11.237, Chingola, Zambia 
Bulaya, Shimba (8), lay woman; The United Methodist 

Church, P.O. Box 11.237, Chingola, Zambia 
Katokane, Mande (4), layman; The United Methodist 

Church, P.O. Box 11.237, Chingola, Zambia 
*Nkulu Ntanda, Ntambo (6), missionary; The United 

Methodist Church, P.O. Box 11.237, Chingola, Zambia 
Munza, Kasongo (7), Christian education director; TTie 

United Methodist Church, P.O. Box 11.237, Chingola, 

Zambia 
Ngoy Kyungu, Matanga (5), assistant to bishop; The United 

Methodist Church, P.O. Box 11.237, Chingola, Zambia 
Ngeleka, Mpanga (4), conference treasurer; The United 

Methodist Church, P.O. Box 11.237, Chingola, Zambia 
Katemuna, Monga (2), pastor; The United Methodist 

Church, P.O. Box 11.237, Chingola, Zambia 
Konge, Makese (9), pastor; The United Methodist Church, 

P.O. Box 11.237, Chingola, Zambia 
Munyangwe, Kabamba (7), professor; The United Methodist 

Church, P.O. Box 11.237, Chingola, Zambia 
Lenge, Kasongo (1), professor; The United Methodist 

Church, P.O. Box 11.237, Chingola, Zambia 

Reserves 

Katokane, Mande, lay man; The United Methodist Church, 

P.O. Box 11.237, Chingola, Zambia 
Kabwende, Numbi, lay man; The United Methodist Church, 

P.O. Box 11.237, Chingola, Zambia 
Motombo, Ngoy, lay woman; The United Methodist 

Church, P.O. Box 11.237, Chingola, Zambia 
Mande, Makonga, lay woman; The United Methodist 

Church, P.O. Box 11.237, Chingola, Zambia 
Masengele, Ngoy, director; The United Methodist Church, 

P.O. Box 11.237, Chingola, Zambia 
Bondo, Ndayi, professor; The United Methodist CHurch, 

P.O. Box 11.237, Chingola, Zambia 
Mwema, Kanonge, women's group vice-president; The 

United Methodist Church, P.O. Box 11.237, Chingola, 

Zambia 
Malale Mupika, Ngoie, lay man; TTie United Methodist 

Church, P.O. Box 11.237, Chingola, Zambia 
Ndalamba, Ilunga, district superintendent; The United 

Methodist Church, P.O. Box 11.237, Chingola, Zambia 
Twite Kanonge, Ngoy, district superintendent; The United 

Methodist Church, P.O. Box 11.237, Chingola, Zambia 
Mpiana, Makonga, district superintendent; The United 

Methodist Church, P.O. Box 11.237, Chingola, Zambia 
Ka-Kabamba, Kazadi, professor; The United Methodist 

Church, P.O. Box 11.237, Chingola, Zambia 



Delegate Information 



55 



Kinkundulu, Nyembo, professor; The United Methodist 
Church, P.O. Box 11.237, Chingola, Zambia 

Kalume Mayombo, Mwepu, pastor; The United Methodist 
Church, P.O. Box 11.237, Chingola, Zambia 

Ngoie Wa Kuvid, Monga, pastor; The United Methodist 
Church, P.O. Box 11.237, Chingola, Zambia 

North Texas (12) 

Sec. B Row 18 Seats 1-12 

Deal, Pat M. (1) , counselor; 1508 Andria, Wichita Falls, TX 

76302 
Casad, Mary Brooke (3), writer; 2717 Coventry Lane, 

CarroUton,TX 75007-4861 
Williams, Raymond (8), retired; 1246 Whispering Trail, 

Dallas, TX 75241 
Adair, Sharon W. (10), Associate Director Council on 

Ministries; P.O. Box 516069, Dallas, TX 75251 
Christian, Tom L. (2), Coordinator Conference 

Administrative Services; P.O. Box 516069, Dallas, TX 

75251 
Richards, Alys P. (7), SMU Special Events Director; 4 

Forest Park Drive, Richardson, TX 75080 
*Henderson, Ronald D. (6), pastor; 11881 Schroeder Road, 

Dallas, TX 75243 
Crouch, William C. (10), district superintendent; P.O. Box 

8127, Dallas, TX 75205 
Farrell, Leighton K. (4), Conference Director of 

Development; P.O. Box 516069, Dallas, TX 75251 
Underwood, Donald W. (4) , pastor; 2640 Glencliff, Piano, TX 

75075 
LaBarr,Joan G. (5), district superintendent; 1101 South 

Scott Street, Suite 2, Wichita Falls TX,76301 
Jones, Scott J.. (9), pastor; 1709 Hwy. 50, Commerce, TX 

75428 

Reserves 

Smith. Scott, Dallas Medical City C.E.O.; 2361 Highlands 

Creek Road, CarroUton, TX 75007 
Gilreath, Judy M., secretary/treasurer Gilreath 

Investments; Inc., P.O. Box 556, Sulphur Springs, TX 

75483 
Gulick, Tom, consultant; Route 2, Box 486E, Pottsboro, TX 

75076 
Crouch, Tmiothy C, cable television manager; 2312 

Parkside, Denton, TX 76201 
Tichenor, Usa W.; 3924 Mockingbird Lane, Dallas, TX 75205 
Wiggans, Barbara T.; 4129 Northview Lane, Dallas, TX 

75229 
Blanton, Georjean H., pastor; 9998 Ferguson Road, Dallas, 

TX 75228 
Brady III, Hal N., pastor; 1928 Ross Avenue, Dallas, TX 

75201 
Woods, Carol, pastor; 4501 Matthew Road, Grand Prairie, TX 

75052 
Durham, Jr, Frederick L; pastor, 927 West Tenth, Dallas 

TX,75208 
Thomburg, John D., pastor; 11211 Preston Road, Dallas, TX 

75230 
Masters, Sr., Henry L; district superintendent, 1928 Ross 

Avenue, Dallas Tx,75201 



Northeast Zaire (2) 

Sec. B Row 11 Seats 10-11 

Munda, Ukunda (4), lay leader; 2867 Av. Ecuries, 

Kinshasa/Ngaliema, Zaire 
*Unda, Yemba (6), pastor; 2867 Av. Ecuries, 

Kinshasa/Ngaliema, Zaire 

Reserves 

Oleko, A. Nyembo, lasy leader; 2867 Av Ecuries, 

Kinshasa/Ngaliema, Zaire 
Wembo, Mundeke, doctor; 2867 Av. Ecuries, 

Kinshasa/Ngaliema, Zaire 
Okoko, Luhata, pastor; 2867 Av. Ecuries, 

Kinshasa/Ngaliema, Zaire 
Wembo, Lushima, pastor; 2867 Av. Ecuries, 

Kinshasa/Ngaliema, Zaire 

Northern Illinois (14) 

Sec. B Row 10 Seats 1-7 
Row 11 Seats 1-7 

Akers, Mary E. (6), retired teacher; 620 Emmert Drive, 

Sycamore, IL 60178 
Williams, Margaret A. (6), diaconal minister/social worker; 

1073 West Maxwell Street, Chicago, IL 60608 
Siaba, Judith E. (2), teacher; 107 South Congress, Polo, IL 

61064 
McCabe, John S. (4), corporation vice-president; 9 West 

Bailey Road, Napendlle, IL 60565 
Henry, Daniel (3), engineer; 227 Charlotte Lane, 

Bollingbrook,IL 60440 
Cain, Alfred E. (8), retired editor; 7012 South Shore Drive, 

Chicago, IL 60649 
Duel, Nancy D. (10), church and community volunteer; 115 

North Windsor Drive, Arlington Heights, IL 60004 
*Keaton, Jonathan D. (5), district superintendent; 20 West 

Tupelo, Naperville, IL 60540 
Kwon, Duk Kyu (10), district superintendent; 1475 Maple 

Lane, Elgin, IL 60123 
Dillard, Kay B. (1), district superintendent; 10051 South 

Hoyne, Chicago, IL 60643' 
Williams, Tullalah F. (9), pastor; 223 North Emerson, ML 

Prospect, IL 60056 
Park, Young Ok (2), pastor; 523 Wauponsee, Morris, IL 

60450 
McCoy, Myron F. (7), pastor; 801 South Eberhart, Chicago, 

IL 60619 
Percell, Emery A. (4), pastor; 5005 Brookeview Road, 

Rockford,IL61107 

Reserves 

Nailor, Steven F., public affairs director; 2202 Chiu-chview 

Drive -E,Rockford,IL 61107 
Keck, Matthew C, student; 664 Addison Street, Elgin, IL 

60120 
Webb, Arthur A., retired engineer; 23845 West Sussex 

Drive, Channahan, IL 60410 
Fujiu, Kiyoko Kasai, organizational consultant; 9110 East 

Prairie Road, Evanston, IL 60203 
Butz, Janice I., diaconal minister; 2123 Harrison Street, 

Evanston, IL 60201 
Dimas, Jacqueline, General Board of Pensions and Health 

Benefits staff; 8825 Knox Avenue, Skokie, IL 60076 



56 



DCA Advance Edition 



John, Emmy L., volunteer/homemaker; 411 Grand Avenue, 

Aurora, IL 60506 
Dell, GregrcjR., pastor; 217 South Euclid, Oak Park, IL 

60302 
Gonzales, Annie J., pastor; 151 East Whitehall, Northlake, IL 

60164 
Guest, Donald F., pastor; 8230 South Crandon, Chicago, IL 

60617 
Wilson, James M., district superintendent; 611 linden Place, 

DeKalb,IL60115 
Hoke, Sandra F., pastor; 6829 Thomas Parkway, Rockford, 

IL 61114 
Hakeem, Berty, pastor; 1711 Creve Coeur, LaSalle, IL 61301 
Birkhahn-Rommelfanger, Betty J., pastor; 2212 Ridge, 

Evanston.IL 60201 

Northern New Jersey (6) 

Sec. A Row 1 Seats 1-6 

Olson, Harriet Jane (5), attorney; 362 South Street, 

Morristown, NJ 07960 
Olive, George E. (8), conference council director; 147 

Westville Avenue, Caldwell, NJ 07006 
Brandt, Robert B. (3), consulting agency officer; 250 

Jefferson Avenue, River Edge, NJ 07661 
*Lyght, Ernest S. (6), district superintendent; 512 Bradford 

Avenue, Westfield, NJ 07090-3026 
Goodwin, Galen L. (10), pastor; 20 Oak Drive, Chatham, NJ 

07928 
Mitchell, Beth W. (9), pastor; 358 Anderson Avenue, 

Hackensack, NJ 07601 

Reserves 

Spelman, Jeffrey R., systems analyst; 1151 Gresham Road, 

Plainfield, NJ 07062 
Barrier, Edna M., administrative assistant; 19 Old Wolfe 

Road, Budd Lake, NJ 07828 
Arthur, Algernon H. G., shipping manager; 402 Tremont 

Place, Orange, NJ 07050 
Young, Betty J., pastor; 76 Congers Road, New City, NY 

10956 
Park, Jeremiah J., associate council director; 22 Madison 

Avenue, Madison, NJ 07940 
Sanchez, Jorge E., pastor; 1060 Overlook Terrace, Union, NJ 

07083 

Northwest Texas (6) 

Sec. A Row 17 Seats 5-10 

*Hill, Ed H. (5), lawyer; 3909 Doris Drive, Amaiillo, TX 

79109-5506 
Schock, Louise K. (10), council director; 5201 - 90th Street, 

Lubbock, TX 79424-4301 
Nixon, Harold D. (1), farm supply owner; 15 Cobblestone 

Lane, Abilene, TX 79606-2817 
Smith, Jim W. (6), pastor; 4600 South Western Street, 

Amarillo,TX 79109-6025 
Kirk, R. L (9), pastor; P.O. Box 1981, Pampa.TX 79066-1981 
Whittle, Charles D. (3), district superintendent; P.O. Box 

3239, Big Spring, TX 79721-3239 

Reserves 

Wright, Peggy J., conference president United Methodist 
Women; 3010 Edgemont Drive, Abilene, TX 79605-6913 

Shaw, Bobbye R., estate liquidator; 2309 - 53rd Street, 
Lubbock, TX 79412-2523 



McAlpin, Jackie L, college staff; 1707 Hillcrest Drive, 

Canyon, TX 79015-5235 
Couch, Bill J., pastor; 4701 - 82nd Street, Lubbock, TX 

79424-3236 
Boyd, Lane, pastor; 305 North Baird Street, Midland, TX 

79701-4701 
Mills, Tom N., pastor; 3717 - 44th Street, Lubbock, TX 

79413-3499 

Norway (2) 

Sec. D Row 8 Seats 11-12 

Isnes, Anders (9), teacher; Ragnhild Schibbyesv. 55, N-0968 

Oslo, Norway 
Helliesen, Oyvind (10), superintendent; Alperosevn. 5, 

N-4023 Stavanger, Norway 

Reserves 

Bjomevik, Per Endre; Bakkavn. 17, N-4060 Kleppe, Norway 
Odland, Tove, mission secretary; Postboks 2744 St. 

Hanshaugen, N-0131 Oslo, Norway 
Kroslid, Sigmund; Meisevn. 5, N-4400 Flekkeflord, Norway 
Jacobsen, Svein; Aslia 7, N-1639 Gamle Fredrikstad, Norway 
ByholtThorsen, Helen; Ulsholtvn. 27 A, N-1053 Oslo, 

Norway 
Ribe, Torbjom; Torderodgt 7, N-1511 Moss, Norway 
Wendel, Jorunn, superintendent; Postboks 2744 SL 

Hanshaugen, N-0131 Oslo, Norway 
Olsen, Oystein, pastor; Gjoavn. 11, N-1654 Sellebakk, Norway 
Sanden, Hilde, pastor; Lundvn. 15 B, N-0678 Oslo, Norway 
Nordby, Lars Erik, pastor; Ridehusgt 7 A, N-1606 

Fredrikstad, Norway 
Hansen, Lei/A., superintendent; Kveldrovn. 22, N-9400 

Harstad, Norway 
Westad, Ola, pastor; Allegt. 18, N4400 Flekkefiord, Norway 

Oklahoma (20) 

Sec. C Row 10 Seats 1-10 
Row 11 Seats 1-10 

*Oden, Tal (10), attorney/college teacher; 913 East Elm, 

Altus, OK 73521 
Benson, Judy J. (6), accountant; 1000 Wall, Frederick, OK 

73542 
Junk, Tom M. (1), church business administrator; 2741 

South Aspen Court, Broken Arrow, OK 74012 
Hodges, Lany T. (9), farmer/rancher; Route 1, Box 3, 

Forgan OK,73938 
Young, Carl W. (3), attorney; 417 Kenswidck Court, 

Edmond, OK 73034 
Vanzant, Lucille V. (2) , support in school system; 602 North 

Cox, Wynnewood, OK 73098 
McCray, Holly S. (5), homemaker/freelance journalist; 

Route 6, Box 214, Duncan, OK 73533 
Foster, Nancy K (7), homemaker, 4742 South Irvington, 

Tulsa, OK 74135 
Waymire, Mona Mae (4), insurance; P.O. Box 617, Madill, 

OK 73446 
Agnew, Theodore L (8), retired history professor; 1216 

North Lincoln Street, Stillwater, OK 74075 
Fenn, Philip J (10), pastor; P.O. Box 6390, Norman, OK 

73070 
Biggs, Jr, Marvin Mouzon ; (7), pastor, 1301 South Boston 

Avenue, Tulsa, OK 74119 
Bowles, PaulD. (4), district superintendent; 5319 South 

Lewis, #100, Tulsa, OK 74105 



Delegate Information 



57 



Severe, David L. (5), Local Church Ministries Director; 2420 

North Blackwelder, Oklahoma City, OK 73106 
Buskirk, James B. (3), pastor; 1115 South Boulder, Tulsa, 

OK 74119 
Henry, William R. (2), district superintendent; 2200 North 

Classen, #1320, Oklahoma City, OK 73106 
Potts, Bertha M. (9), pastor; 2020 Sunny Lane, Del City, OK 

73115 
Harris, Joseph L (1), district superintendent; 2608 

Ridgeway, Ardmore, OK 73401 
Pierson, Robert D. (6), pastor; 3515 South Harvard, Tulsa, 

OK 74119 
Ames III, Guy C. (8), pastor; 2717 West Hefner Road, 

Oklahoma City, OK 73120 

Reserves 

Polk, Sherrie D., student; Route 1, Box 1009, Talihina, OK 

74571 
Parker, Sr., Robert (L.), board chairman, 8 East Third 

Street, Tulsa, OK 74103 
Richardson, Emma M., diaconal minister; 1301 South 

Boston Avenue, Tulsa, OK 74119 
Peters, Frieda K., homemaker; 1123 Graham, Stillwater, OK 

74075 
Roman, David P., diaconal minister of music; P.O. Box 180, 

Mustang, OK 73064 
Bauman, Dianne R., homemaker/community volunteer; 

2414 Smoking Oak Drive, Norman, OK 73072 
Gilbert, Ron W., dentist; 304 B Street NW, Miami, OK 74354 
Ashton, Mark A., attorney; 1618 NW 34th, Lawton, OK 

73505 
Coulter, Vicki S., housewife; Box 538, Helena, OK 73741 
Beard, Herschel, abstractor; P.O. Box 50, MadiU, OK 73446 
Holmes, Lucinda S., pastor; P.O. Box 3707, Enid, OK 73702 
Moss, Danny J, pastor; 2602 NW Ferris, Lawton, OK 73505 
Neaves, Norman E., pastor; 14343 North MacArthur, 

Oklahoma City, OK 73142 
Gragg, James P. , pastor; 40 West Seventh, Stillwater, OK 

74074 
Thomas, David W, pastor; P.O. Box 1136, Bartlesville, OK 

74005 
Warfield,Jr., Stanley M.; district superintendent, P.O. Box 

5024, Enid, OK 73701 
Allen, Robert L, pastor; 1401 NW25th, Oklahoma City, OK 

73106 
Cook, Carol A., pastor; 302 East Independence, Shavraee, 

OK 74801 
Scott, Donald L, pastor; 5001 North Everest, Oklahoma 

City, OK 73111 
Moffatt, Jessica F., pastor; 1115 South Boulder, Tulsa, OK 

74119 

Oklahoma Indian Missionary (2) 

Sec. C Row 18 Seats 1-2 

*Saunkeah, Ann (5), teacher; P.O. Box 4584, Tulsa, OK 

74159^584 
Deer, Alvin B. (4), pastor; 616 S.W. 70th, Oklahoma City, 

OK 73139 

Reserves 

Long, Nellie; 1213 North Indiana, Oklahoma City, OK 73106 
Roughface, Thomas, conference superintendent; 6704 
Gleason Circle, Bethany, OK 73008 



Oregon-Idaho (6) 

Sec. B Row 14 Seats 1-6 

Boe, Donna H. (1), ESL tutor; 226 South 16th. Pocatella, ID 

83201 
Cook, Jr., William B. (3), consultant, 15220 NW Oak HiUs 

Drive, Beaverton, OR 97006 
Outslay, Marilyn, J. (6), choir director; 18570 Honeywood 

Drive; Aloha, OR 97006 
*Pitney, Deborah G. (10), district superintendent; 1405 

Joyce, Boise, ID 83706 
Greathouse, Lowell R. (5), pastor; 12555 SW Fourth Street, 

Beaverton, OR 97005 
Owen-Bofferding, Sue J. (2), district superintendent; P.O. 

Box 188, Bend, OR 97709 

Reserves 

Walker, Beverly J., retired; 1266 SW Fourth Street, 

Gresham, OR 97080-6820 
Meyers, Robert C, conference treasurer; 1505 SW 18th 

Avenue, Portland, OR 97201 
Gallagher, Marianne J., nurse; 12200 SE 31st Place, #99, 

MUwaukee, OR 97222-8606 
Yamamoto, Dean S. H., pastor; 1333 SE 28th Avenue, 

Portland, OR 972 14 
Taylor, Wesley D. , pastor; 9845 SW Walnut Place, Tigard, 

OR 97223 
Fernandez, Arturo M., district superintendent; 680 State 

Street, Salem, OR 97301 

Pacific Northwest (8) 

Sec. D Row 20 Seats IS 

Ferguson, Phyllis S. (3), office manager; 10050 - 43rd Place 

N.E., Seattle, WA 98125 
Yeoh, Jenni M. (6), homemaker; 7021 - 50th Avenue N.E., 

Seattle, WA 981 15 
Barr, Robin E. (8), student; 1150 West Spruce Court, 

Sequim,WA 98382 
Stevens, Robert W. (4), conference treasurer; 2112 Third 

Avenue, Suite 300, Seattle, WA 98121 
*Stanovsky, Elaine J. W. (5),district superintendent; P.O. 

Box 1052, Everett, WA 98206 
Hoshibata, Robert T (1), pastor; 3001 - 24th Avenue South, 

Seattle, WA 98144 
Moe, Sharon L (10), pastor; 4909 Purdue Avenue N.E., 

Seattle, WA 98105 
Rosas, Robert R. (9), district superintendent; 63 Baumeister 

Drive, Walla WaUa, WA 99362 

Reserves 

Sherbrooke, Sue, finance and property diretor; 2300 North 

43rd, SeatUe.WA 98103 
Gates, Jim R., teacher; 207 North Franklin, Wenatchee, WA 

98801 
Grossman, Gail F., retreat leader; 347 East Alder Drive, 

SedroWoolley,WA 98284 
Mariano, Carol A., student; 2729 - 72nd Avenue S.E., 

Mercer Island, WA 98040 
Foster, L Daniel, pastor; 20730 S.E. 272nd Street, Kent, WA 

98042 
Bowers, Flora J., pastor; 15255 S.E. Fairwood Boulevard, 

Renton,WA 98058 
Jackson, Gregory K., pastor; 18515- 92nd Avenue N.E., 

Bothell.WA 98011 



58 



DCA Advance Edition 



Barr, Roger W., pastor; 100 South Blake, Sequim, WA 98382 

Palawan Provisional (2) 

Sec. D Row 6 Seats 10-11 

Rojas, Marivic H. (1), employee; The United Methodist 

Church, Bataraza, Palawan Philippines 
*Macabuag, Rafael M. (3), pastor; The United Methodist 

Church, Princess Urduja, Narra Palawan,Philippines 

Reserves 

Tamayo, Qualita, businesswoman; The United Methodist 

Church, San Vicente, Palawan Philippines 
Mortel, Yolanda, farmer; The United Methodist Church, Rio 

Tuba, Palawan Philippines 
Butaca, Domingo, teacher; TTie United Methodist Church, 

56-A Lacao Street, Puerto Princesa Palawan,Philippines 
Jacob, Angel, farmer; The United Methodist Church, 56-A 

Lacao Street, Puerto Princesa Palawan,Philippines 
Dillozonjoel, pastor; The United Methodist Church, 

Bataraza, Palawan Philippines 
dela Pena, Sonny, district superintendent; The United 

Methodist Church, Brooke's Point, Palawan Philippines 
Mortel, Isidro, pastor; The United Methodist Church, Rio 

Tuba, Palawan Philippines 
Serafica, Eugene, pastor; The United Methodist Church, 

56-A Lacao Street, Puerto Princesa Palawan,Philippines 

Peninsula-Delaweire (8) 

Sec. C Row 6 Seats 3-10 

Mason, Howard (3), retired; 730 Nylon Boulevard, Seaford, 

DE 19973 
St. Clair, Liz (5), Christian education consultant; 4011 

Springfield Lane, Wihnington, DE 19807 
Cloud, Kay (4), retired; 431 Briar Creek Drive, Hockessin, 

DE 19707 
Hardcastie, James (7), retired; 121 North Kirkwood Street, 

Dover, DE 19901 
* Baker, Jonathan E. (10), pastor; 13 Bay Harbor Drive, 

Rehoboth Beach, DE 19971 
Seymour, James T. (1), pastor; P.O. Box 309, Hockessin, DE 

19707 
Green, H. Sterling (9), district superintendent; 128 North 

Governors Avenue, Dover, DE 19904 
Kester, Susan K (6), district superintendent; 2200 Baynard 

Boulevard, Wilmington, DE 19802 

Reserves 

Rogers, Lois B., food service manager; 27253 Nevette Muir, 

Westover.MD 21871 
Hof&nan, Irene, procurement officer; 238 Evans Lane, 

Stevensville, DE 21666 
Leathrum, Nancy R., homemaker/ volunteer; 46 Kensington 

Lane, Newark, DE 19713 
Russell, Willard, tovra manager; P.O. Box Q, Greenwood, 

DE 19950 
Livingston, Lawrence M. , pastor; 800 North Walnut Street, 

Wilmington, DE 19801 
Nichols, Charlotte A, district superintendent; 114 North 

Washington Street, Easton, MD 21601 
Bell, Sr., Ronald ; college chaplain, 936 McDowell Drive, 

Dover, DE 19901 
Stookey, Laurence H., seminary professor; 13500 Justice 

Road, Rockville, MD 20853 



Philippines (2) 

Sec. D Row 6 Seats 8-9 

Teano, Veronica C, exporter; 8 C-3 Road, Kaunlaren 

Village, Navotas Metro Manila.Philippines 
*Casuco, Marcelino M., pastor; 1904 F. Agoncillo Street, 
Malate, Metro Manila Philippines 

Reserves 

Gonzalez, Jr., Manuel E.; businessman, 10 Commandments 

UMC, Valenzuela, Philippines 
Sansano, David, businessman; Knox UMC, Sta. Cruz, 

Manila, Philippines 
Puno, Carlito S., president; PCU, Taft Avenue, Manila, 

Philippines 
Pascual, Crisolito S., retired justice; Knox UMC, Sta. Cruz, 

Manila, Philippines 
Penetrante, Apolinario, employee; Queensrow UMC, 

Philippines 
Gomez, Julita R., dean; Sta. Mesa, Manila, Philippines 
Ferrer, Jr., Comelio R.; treasurer, UMC Building, 900 

United Nations Avenue, Manila, Philippines 
Mariano, Liz P., businesswoman; c/o Knox UMC, Sta. Cruz, 

Manila, Philippines 
Reyes, Ruben T., Supreme Court Justice; Spureme Court, 

Taft Avenue, Manila, Philippines 
Jesus de, Edgar A., employee; c/o UMC, 900 United 

Nations Avenue, Manila, Philippines 
Torres, Presentacion J., deaconess; c/o Knox UMC, Lope 

de Vega, Sta. Cruz Manila, Philippines 
Pajaro, Joaquina T., businesswoman; c/o Knox UMC, Lope 

de Vega, Sta. Cruz Manila, Philippines 
Regala, Riolito C, architect; c/o Knox UMC, Lope de Vega, 

Sta. Cruz Manila, Philippines 
Monteloyola, Renato P., businessman; c/o Crossroad UMC, 

Sangandaan, Caloocan, Philippines 
Canlas, S. J. Earl P., employee; c/o UMC, 900 United 

Nations Avenue, Manila, Philippines 
Agtarap, BenerB., district superintendent; UMC Building, 

900 United Nations Avenue, Manila, Philippines 
Mendillo, Benjamin G., district superintendent; UMC 

Building, 900 United Nations Avenue, Manila, Philippines 
Juan, Rodolfo (Rudy) A, Army chaplain; c/o UMC 

Headquarters, 900 United Nations Avenue, Manila, 

Philippines 
Vengco, Nonato U., pastor; Central UMC, T.M. Kalaw Street, 

Ermita Manila, Philippines 
Manuel, Nathaniel S., pastor; 122 Third Street, Tenth 

Avenue, Caloocan City, Philippines 
Legaspi, Dominador C, pastor; Lfnited Methodist Church, P. 

Burgos, Makati, Philippines 
Salvador, Eduardo, pastor; c/o UMC Headquarters, 900 

United Nations Avenue, Ermita Manila, Philippines 
Camazo, Tomas C, pastor; Hope United Methodist Church, 

BPS, Imus Cavite, Philippines 
Mendillo, Menre R., pastor; Road 2, Superville Subdivision, 

Paranaque Metro Manila, Philippines 
Cunanan.Jose Pepito, special appointment; 879 EDSA, 

Quezon City, Metro Manila, Philippines 
Miguel, Romeo G., pastor; Central UMC, T.M. Kalaw Street, 

Ermite Manila, Philippines 
Ibasco, Abelardo 0., hospital chaplain; Tondo, Manila, 

Philippines 
Pablo, Elias F., pastor; Central UMC, T.M. Kalaw Street, 

Ermite Manila, Philippines 
Letana, Ruben M., pastor; Knox UMC, Lope de Vega, Sta. 

Cruz Manila, Philippines 



Delegate Information 



59 



Villa, Samuel B., pastor; Pasay First UMC, University 
Street, Pasey City Metro Manila, Philippines 

Poland (2) 

Sec. C Row 2 Seats 11-12 

Maj, Ryszard (3), teacher; Wojska Polskiego 9/28, 25-364 

Kielce, Poland 
*Puslecki, Edward (6), general superintendent; 

Mokotowska 12/9, 00-561 Warszawa, Poland 

Reserves 

Benedyktowicz, Olgierd, psychologist; Kartaginy 1/272, 

02-762 Warszawa, Poland 
Malicki, Andrzej, pastor; Malopolska 6, 25-341 Kielce, Poland 

Puerto Rico (2) 

Sec. D Row 7 Seats 11-12 

Ortiz Vidal, Victor (4), industrial psychologist; F-1 El Alamo 
Drive, El Alamo, Guaynabo, Puerto Rico 00969 

*Velez. Miguel A. (6), pastor; Via 11 KLr2 #363, Villa 
Fontana, Carolina, Puerto Rico 00983 

Reserves 

Alers, Vanessa, teacher; Apartado 1496, Cidra, Puerto Rico 

00739 
Moreno Rivas, Rafael, district superintendent; Yagrumo F-1, 

Colinas de Guaynabo, Guaynabo, Puerto Rico 00969 

Red Bird Missionary (2) 

Sec. B Row 15 Seats 11-12 

Price, Pearl L (9), retired;, Vincent, KY 41386 
*Morris,Jim W. (2), superintendent; Red Bird Missionary 
Conference, 6 Queendale Center, Beverly KY,40913 

Reserves 

Crawford, Timothy D., Executive Director Henderson 
Settlement; Henderson Settlement, P.O. Box 205, Frakes 
KY,40940 

Landis, C. Robert, pastor;, Coalgood, KY 40818 

Rio Grande (2) 

Sec. B Row 12 Seats 9-10 

Silva, Mary (6), management; 13914 Anchorage Hill, San 

Antonio, TX 78217 
*Carcano, Minerva G. (5), pastor; 3907 Isleta Boulevard 

SW, Albuquerque, NM 87105 

Reserves 

Cruz, Dalila, Women's Division staff; 475 Riverside Drive, 

Room 1501, New York NY,10115 
Gomez, Roberto L, pastor; P.O. Box 28098, San Antonio, TX 

78284 

Rocky Mountain (10 

Sec. B Row 4 Seats 1-10 

*Sewell, Peggy I. (3), educator/communicator; 2344 East 
1700 South, Salt Lake City, UT 84108 



Davis, Judy (1), diaconal minister; 545 West 10th Avenue, 

Broomfield, CO 80020 
Newman, Jared A. (7), student; 7965 Contrails, Colorado 

Springs, CO 80920 
Redding, LaVada S. (6), retired administrative office 

manager; P.O. Box 308, Ovid, CO 80744-0308 
Bean, Robbie (2) , retired educator; 3034 Leyden Street, 

Denver, CO 80207 
Paup, Edward W. (10), assistant to bishop; 2200 South 

University Boulevard, Denver, CO 80210 
Forbes, Janet (5), council director; 2200 South University 

Boulevard, Denver, CO 80210 
Gray, Aaron M. (9), pastor; P.O. Box 7236, Denver, CO 

80207 
Kang, Youngsook C. (8), pastor; 1500 Ford Street, Golden, 

CO 80401 
Messer, Donald E. (4) , seminary president; 2201 South 

University Boulevard, Denver, CO 80210 

Reserves 

Gleaton, Tommy D., retired; P.O. Box 6283, Denver, CO 

80206 
Dolsen, David, conference tresurer; 2200 South University 

Boulevard, Denver, CO 80210 
Anderson, Rodney, local church administrative assistant; 

440 - 33rd Street, Glenwood Springs, CO 81601 
Strait, Nancy, credit union manager; 11461 North Pine 

Drive, Parker, CO 80134 
Smith, Nolan, retired; 702 Hoome Street, Colorado Springs, 

CO 80907 
Kelemeni, Eddie, district superintendent; 522 White Avenue, 

Grand Junction, CO 81501 
Trigg, 0. Gerald, pastor; 420 North Nevada Avenue, 

Colorado Springs, CO 80903 
Downs Rosa, MelanieA., pastor; 1390 Brentwood, 

Lakewood, CO 80215 
Vose, Marvin R, district superintendent; 4273 West 15th 

Street Road, Greeley, CO 80634 
Zimmerman, Marti, pastor; 19491 East Smoky HiD Road, 

Aurora, CO 80015 

Sierra Leone (2) 

Sec. D Row 2 Seats 7-8 

Halloway, Eke A. (5), barrister-at-law; 8 Howe Street, 

Freetown, Sierra Leone 
*farrett, Joseph A.M. (1), principal/associate pastor; Bishop 

Johnson Memorial Secondary School, Fourah Bay Road, 

Freetown, Sierra Leone 

South Carolina 22) 

Sec. B Row 21 Seats 1-12 
Row 22 Seats 1-10 

*Briscoe, I. Carolyn (7), professor; P.O. Box 1825, Clemson, 

SC 29633-1825 
Arant, James S. (10), diaconal minister 108 Coventry Lake 

Drive, Lexington, SC 29072 
Hutchins, Charles A. (10), fundraising/financial consultant; 

106 Cardiff Street, Columbia, SC 29209 
Chaplin, Jr., Hammie L 4; engineer, 2005 Courtney Drive, 

North Augusta, SC 29841 
Fogle, Dolly (3), homemaker; 5005 Neeses Highway, 

Neeses, SC 29107 
Shingler, Sara S. (6), homemaker; 210 Lakewood Drive, 

Spartanburg, SC 29302 



60 



DCA Advance Edition 



Pasley, B. J. (9), retired; P.O. Box 202, Clover, SC 29710 
Appleby, Charlie L. (2), retired; P.O. Box 3286, Florence, 

SC 29502 
Salley, James (1) , Africa University Vice-President for 

Development; P.O. Box 1878, Orangeburg, SC 29115 
Harper, Polly G. (5), housewife; 2 Petiver Lane, Greenville, 

SC 29605 
Yebuah, Lisa (8), student; 3338 Stonehaven Drive, North 

Charleston, SC 29420 
Rogers, Sheila D. (6), district superintendent; 104 Amherst 

Drive, Greenwood, SC 29646 
Stilwell, Robert E. (3) , pastor; 616 Quincy Road, Seneca, SC 

29678 
Johnson, Charles L (5), council director; 4908 Colonial 

Drive, Columbia, SC 29203 
Quilling, Debra A. S. (8), pastor; 6911 Two Notch Road, 

Columbia, SC 29223 
McClendon, William T. (10), pastor; P.O. Box 550, Cheraw, 

SC 29520 
Griffith, Jr., Frank (J.), 10; district superintendent, 139 

Elizabeth Lane, Rock Hill, SC 29730 
Corderman, DelosD. (4), Office of Ministerial Affairs; P.O. 

Box 11284, Columbia, SC 29211 
Johnson, H. Sam (9) , district superintendent; 754 Rutledge 

Avenue, Charleston, SC 29403 
Reid, William C. (1), pastor; P.O. Drawer 1988, Greenville, 

SC 29602 
Simmons, Angelin J. (7) , district superintendent; P.O. Box 

303, Orangeburg, SC 291160303 
Willimon, William H. (2), professor; 3104 Doubleday Place, 

Durham, NC 27705 

Reserves 

Redmond, John A., jeweler; Box 26, Greenville, SC 29602 
Willson, June B., Christian educator; 317 Ayers Circle, 

Summerville, SC 29485 
Addison, Rubielee L, retired teacher; P.O. Box 1338, 

Clemson, SC 29633 
McGuirt, Betty Moss B., Christian education volunteer; 410 

Auld Brass Road, Walterboro, SC 29488 
Buie, Becky L, accountant; P.O. Box 3787, Columbia, SC 

29230 
Carter, Fletcher, stewardship consultant; 323 Hallsborough 

Drive, West Columbia, SC 29170 
Bennett, Hazel C, diaconal minister; 28 South Main Street, 

Inman, SC 29349 
Mitchell, Peter T., college president; 1301 Columbia 

College Drive, Columbia, SC 29203 
Kent, Harry R., construction consultant; P.O. Box 30156, 

Charleston, SC 29417 
Mays, Harriett A., homemaker; 1110 Marshall Road, 

Greenwood, SC 29646 
Williams, Danny, computer programmer; 1200 St. Andrews 

Road, Apt. 607, Columbia, SC 29210-5864 
McDowell, Jr, Edward H. pastor, 232 Meadowbury Drive, 

Columbia, SC 29203 
Carter, Lemuel C, district superintendent; P.O. Box 543, 

Marion, SC 29571 
Strait, Goerge E., district superintendent; 205 Boxwood 

Lane, Greenville, SC 29601 
Jenkins, Alonza C, pastor; 701 St. John Street, Kngstree, SC 

29556 
Lewis, Sinclair E., pastor; 3407 Devine Street, Columbia, SC 

29205 
Brittain, Thomas N., retired pastor; 3921 Camellia Drive, 

Myrtle Beach, SC 29577 



Howell, Jr., Robert J; pastor, P.O. Box 5446, Florence, SC 

29502 
Henderson, Michael B., pastor; 182 Gordon Street, 

Charleston, SC 29403 
Fisher, A Mickey, pastor; P.O. Box 2947, Spartanburg, SC 

29304 
White, Sara A, pastor; P.O. Box 807, Isle of Palms, SC 29451 
Ulmer, Susan, pastor; 202 East Bridge Street, SL Matthews, 

SC 29135 

South Geoi^a (14) 

Sec. B Row 19 Seats 1-8 
Row 20 Seats 1-6 

Hatcher, William 'Bill' S. (5), businessman; 104 Dumbarton 

Drive, Statesboro, GA 30458 
Phillips, J. Taylor (3), state court judge; P.O. Box 6242, 

Macon, GA 3 1208 
Black, Charlene R. (7), college administrator/professor; 720 

Captola Road, Sylvania, GA 30467 
Martin, Flo S. (2), curriculum consultant; 122 Worthing 

Road, St Simons Island, GA 31522 
Deriso, Jr., Walter M. (4), bank president, P.O. Box 1912, 

Albany, GA 3 1702 
Hopkins, Carolyn J. (7), financial secretary; 2018 Hadley 

Ferry Road, Cairo, GA 31728 
Cofer, Jr., Charles H. (6), retired, 10292 Zebina Road, 

Louisville, GA 30434 
*Edwards, Marion M. (6), pastor; P.O. Box 867, Columbus, 

GA 31902 
Daughtery, Vergil L. (3), pastor; 100 East Park Avenue, 

Valdosta,GA31602 
Bagwell, Timothy J. (10) , pastor; 2200 Dawson Road, Albany, 

GA 31707 
Swanson, James E. (1), pastor; 3993 SL Mary's Road, 

Columbus, GA 31907 
Horton.John E. (9), district superintendent; 4842 Wesleyan 

Woods Drive, Macon, GA 31210 
Pennell, James T. (4), council director; P.O. Box 20408, St 

Simons Island, GA 31522 
Rush, James H. (8), pastor; P.O. Box 20407, St. Simons 

Island, GA 31522 

Reserves 

Crosse, James E.W., urologist; 6758 Beaver Court, Midland, 

GA 31820 
Parker, Nancy P., volunteer; P.O. Box 18, Bronwood, GA 

31726 
Macelhannon, Jean 'Dodie' B., housewife; 444 Holland 

Drive, Fortson.GA 31808 
Manson, Carolyn P., homemaker; 4 Sherborne Lane, 

Savannah, GA 31419 
Wilkes, Talmadge J., insurance agent; P.O. Box 6127, 

Columbus, GA 31907 
Rumford, Steve L, children's home administrator; 130 

Arlington Row, Macon, GA 31210 
Traver, Melissa S., student; 568 Waterford Landing Road, 

Richmond Hill, GA 31324 
Beckum, Robert J, pastor; P.O. Box 738, Douglas, GA 31533 
Hinshaw, M. Creede, pastor; P.O. Box 149, Macon, GA 31202 
Haygood, David T, district superintendent; 106 Lee 

Boulevard, Savannah, GA 31405 
Kea, Donald M. , pastor; P.O. Box 448, Albany, GA 

31702-0448 
Dent, Joel //..district superintendent; 410 Pine Forest 

Street, DubUn.GA 31021 



Delegate Information 



61 



Wilsott-Parsons, Mary Jane, pastor; P.O. Box 434, 

HawkinsviUe. GA 31036-0434 
Roberson, Joseph, pastor; 1213 Benning Drive, Columbus, 

GA 31903 

South Indiana (16) 

Sec. C Row 8 Seats 1-8 
Row 9 Seats 1-8 

Thomas, John J. (9), lawyer; P.O. Box 194, Brazil, IN 47834 
Oglesby, Anthony R. (1), music director; 7905-D Coventry 

Court, Evansville, IN 47715 
Marshall, Carolyn M. (10), General Conference Secretary; 

204 North Newlin Street, Veedersburg, IN 47987-1358 
Jones, Brian N. (3), student; P.O. Box 504, Hymera, IN 

47855 
Miller, Mary H. (4), retired; 6434 East 52nd Street, 

Indianapolis, IN 46226-2588 
Miller, Patricia L (5), state senator; 1041 South Muesing 

Road, Indianapolis, IN 46239-9614 
Van Stone, Jack (2), lawyer; 1301 Southfield Road, 

Evansville, IN 47715-5203 
White, David L (6), General Board of Discipleship staff; 

P.O. Box 840, Nashville, TN 37202 
*Ruach, Susan W.N. (10), council director; P.O. Box 5008, 

Bloomington, IN 47407-5008 
Coleman, Robert P. (6), district superintendent; 3 Orchard 

Lane, Flouds Knobs, IN 47119-9707 
Armstrong, Charles R. (3), pastor; 7101 North Shadeland 

Avenue, Indianapolis, IN 46250 
Hutchinson, Charles L. (1), pastor; 5959 Grandview Drive, 

Indianapolis, IN 46208-1399 
Hopkins, John L. (4), pastor; 2109 Lincoln, Evansville, IN 

47714-1694 
McGarvey, Gregory (7), pastor; 7995 East 21st Street, 

Indianapolis, IN 46219-2410 
Gentry, James E. (9), pastor; 618 Eighth Street, Columbus, 

IN 47201-6891 
Amerson, Philip A. (8) , pastor; P.O. Box 936, Bloomington, 

IN 47402 

Reserves 

Talbott, Bert, retired; 2004 East 91st Street, Indianapolis, IN 

46240-1908 
Porterfield, Charles W., retired; 5708 Wallingwood Drive, 

Indianapolis, IN 46226-1341 
Hess, Kay, music teacher; 2028 Davis Meyers Road, 

Fountain City, IN 47341 
Fowler, James A., retired; 918 Lombard, Evansville, IN 

47714-0429 
Crane, David F., construction company owner; 3 Green 

Acres, Washington, IN 47501 
Mayo, Margaret J., administrative assistant; 3836 Parkwood 

Drive, Indianapolis, IN 46254 
Montgomery, Pamela, diaconal minister; 4780 East 126th 

Street, Carmel, IN 46033 
McKain, Tom, physician; 914 Oakland Court New Albany, 

IN 47150 
Easley, Ida, pastor; 2781 North 500 East, Columbus, IN 

47203-9356 
Moman, Mary Ann, pastor; 3425 West 30th Street, 

Indianapolis, IN 46222-2172 
Penalva, David E., pastor; P.O. Box 11774, Indianapolis, IN 

46201-0774 



Millard, M. Kent, pastor; 100 West 86th Street, Indianapolis, 

IN 46260-2391 
Hamon, C. Mac, pastor; 300 Mary Street, Evansville, IN 

47710-1292 
Miller, Jack P., pastor; 5500 North Meridian Street, 

Indianapolis, IN 46208-2598 
Fisher, Mark A., pstor; 3179 North Mt. Comfort Road, 

Greenfield. IN 46140-9635 
Beck, Michael R., pastor, 141 Heidelberg Road NW, 

Corydon, IN 47112-9290 

Southern Illinois (6) 

Sec. D Row 1 Seats 1-6 

Mays, Orville (5), retired transportation superintendent; 58 

Will-Vina Drive, Collinsville, IL 62234 
Hutchison, Larry (2), customer service manager; 53 

Lockhaven Drive, Granite City, IL 62040 
Blacklock, Gloria J. (6), retired farm family; 41 Rodan Drive, 

Vergennes,IL 62994 
*Myers, Mark C. (3), pastor; 335 South Fair Street, Olney, 

IL 62450 
Meeks, Donald L (10), pastor; 603 West St. Louis Street, 

Lebanon, IL 62254 
Renshaw, Earl R. (9), district superintendent; 1019 North 

Burtschi Street, Vandalia, IL 62471 

Reserves 

Sims, Jeanne', retired teacher; 203 East Grove Avenue, 

Effingham, IL 62401 
Luckert, Dorothy, retired secretary; 4051 Breckenridge 

Lane, Granite City, IL 62040 
Renfro, Mary W., retired teacher; 124 Florence Street, 

Lebanon, IL 62254 
Weatherall, Sylvester, pastor; 404 West Dee Street, Lebanon, 

IL 62254 
Frazier, William 0., district superintendent; 1703 North 

Linda Lane, Olney, IL 62450 
Edwards, Tena i?., pastor; 219 East Union Avenue, 

Utchfield,IL 62056 

Southern New Jersey (10) 

Sec. C Row 13 Seats 1-10 

*Beppler, Ron (9), computer consultant; 2326 Corbett Road, 

Pennsauken, NJ 008109 
Davis, Elwood G. (7), retired Public/Business 

Administrator; 1614 North Arkansas Avenue, Atlantic 

City, NJ 08401 
McCullough, June D. (5), homemaker; 712 Holmes Avenue, 

Vineland, NJ 08360 
Hoffman, Elizabeth (4), bookkeeper/secretary; 188 High 

Street, P.O. Box 124, Port Morris, NJ 08349 
Shivers, Constance A. (1), homemaker; 19 Madaket Court, 

Ocean City, NJ 08226 
Reasner, William S. (6), district superintendent; 445 East 

Main Street, Moorestown, NJ 08057 
Thielking, William B. (3), retired; 11 Pike Avenue, Millville, 

NJ 08332 
Rainier, Helen L. (2), pastor; 102 Salem Hill Road, Howell, 

NJ 07731 
Ruff, Jerry D. (8), pastor; 14 Eden Hollow Lane, Sicklerville, 

NJ 08081 
McCleary, Renee L. (10), pastor; 200 Ava Avenue, 

Somerdale, NJ 08083 



62 



DCA Advance Edition 



Reserves 

Thomas, Clara E., diaconal minister; 951 Old York Road, 

Highstown, NJ 08520 
Ricards, Betty P., retired secretary; 315 West Park Drive, 

Bridgeton, NJ 08302 
Anderson, Gregory L, computer systems integrator; 63 

Oakwood Drive, Medford, NJ 08055 
Shervanick, Nancy L., administration assistant; 12 West 

Joffre Avenue, Milltown, NJ 08850 
Campher, Lorena W., retired supervisory systems analyst 8 

Bridal Wreath Court, Marlton, NJ 08053 
Murphy, Sandra L, district superintendent; 725 Old Corlies 

Avenue, Neptune, NJ 07753 
Baxter, Harlan M., pastor; 533 Kings Highway, 

Moorestown, NJ 08057 
Blacktvell, Dennis L, pastor; 5015 Chapel Avenue, 

Pennsauken, NJ 08109 
Sadio, Sydney S., pastor; 371 Wheeler Road, North 

Brunswick, NJ 08902 
Janka.John A, district superintendent; 90 Sharp Street, 

Millville, NJ 08332 

Southern Zaire (8) 

Sec. D Row 19 Seats 5-12 

Samuel, Kayombo (9), lay leader; P.O. Box 11237, Chingola, 

Zambia 
Kapend, Musumb (1), women's president; P.O. Box 11237, 

Chingola, Zambia 
Kayinda, Mujinga (4), financial member; P.O. Box 11237, 

Chingola, Zambia 
Moma, MomaWa (2), lay leader; P.O. Box 11237, Chingola, 

Zambia 
Francis, Lufunda (9) , lay leader; P.O. Box 11237, Chingola, 

Zambia 
Aying, MulandK. (10), pastor; P.O. Box 11237, Chingola, 

Zambia 
Kapumha, Isolo (5), assistant to bishop; P.O. Box 11237, 

Chingola, Zambia 
Zomhil, Mwez (8), evangelist; P.O. Box 11237, Chingola, 

Zambia 
Nawej, SulA (3), pastor; P.O. Box 11237, Chingola, Zambia 
*Nkemha, Ndjungu (6), pastor; P.O. Box 11237, Chingola, 

Zambia 

Reserves 

Kayeke, Nguz, lay leader; P.O. Box 11237, Chingola, Zambia 
Sololo, Nduu, High Institute Director; P.O. Box 11237, 

Chingola, Zambia 
Mukazu, Mayonde, secondary school director; P.O. Box 

11237, Chingola, Zambia 
Nshimpundu, Musonda, coordinator of schools; P.O. Box 

11237, Chingola, Zambia 
Yav, Ditend, financial member; P.O. Box 11237, Chingola, 

Zambia 
Chisangam, Mbal Yav, lay leader; P.O. Box 11237, Chingola, 

Zambia 
Rubemb, Nawej, lay leader; P.O. Box 11237, Chingola, 

Zambia 
Alfred, Champa, pastor; P.O. Box 11237, Chingola, Zambia 
Diur, Ngaj, pastor; P.O. Box 11237, Chingola, Zambia 
Chinyam, Yirung, pastor; P.O. Box 11237, Chingola, Zambia 
Yav, Nzam, medical coordinator; P.O. Box 11237, Chingola, 

Zambia 



Kilimho, Kajoba, seminary director; P.O. Box 11237, 

Chingola, Zambia 
Laishi, Bwalya, superintendent; P.O. Box 11237, Chingola, 

Zambia 
Kavund, Kapend, pastor; P.O. Box 11237, Chingola, Zambia 

Southwest Philippines Provisional (2) 

Sec. B Row 14 Seats 9-10 

Ygar, Teresita A. (4), teacher, 5 San Isidro Street, 
Mamburao, Occidental Mindoro, Philippines 

*Villalon,Jr., Aniceto (R.), 1; district superintendent. Good 
Shepherd United Methodist Church, San Jose 
Occidental Mindoro, Philippines 

Reserves 

Benoza, Melody, student; c/o Good Shepherd United 

Methodist Church, Labangan, San Jose Occidental 

Mindoro, Philippines 
Baluntong, Glofie, deaconess; San Mariano United 

Methodist Church, San Mariano, Occidental Mindoro, 

Philippines 
Viduya, Trinidad; San Mariano, Occidental Mindoro, 

Philippines 
Dumag, Rolando, farmer; Pag-asa, Sablayan, Occidental 

Mindoro, Philippines 
Ruedas, Prudencio, farmer; Magsaysay, Occidental 

Mindoro, Philippines 
Yasay, WilfredoA., resource development worker; The 

United Methodist Church, Mamburae, Occidental 

Mindoro, Philippines 
Villalon, Marie-Sol S., district superintendent; The United 

Methodist Church, Rexas, Occidental Mindoro, 

Philippines 
Abesamis, Leodegario R., pastor; Good Shepherd United 

Methodist Church, San Jose, Occidental Mindoro, 

Philippines 
Pimentel, Fe C, pastor; The United Methodist CHurch, 

Pinagturilan, Sta. Cruz Occidental Mindoro, Philippines 
Baluntong, Glorioso, pastor; Calintaan, Occidental Mindoro, 

Philippines 

Southwest Texas (10) 

Sec. B Row 15 Seats 1-10 

Bonner, Byrd L (5), attorney, 223 Springwood Lane, San 

Antonio, TX 78216 
Ashmos, Donde Plowman (7), professor; 6520 Ladera 

Norte, Austin, TX 78731 
Etter, Martha B. (3), retired; 4905 Hodges, San Antonio, TX 

78238 
Batiste, Jr., Harold E.; 6; health insurance consultant, 709 

Fawndale, San Antonio, TX 78239 
Heare, Jerry (8), commercial real estate; 3313 Thousand 

Oakes Cove, Austin, TX 78746 
*Huie, Janice Riggle K (9) , district superintendent; 2201 

Sherwood Way, Suite 210, San Angelo, TX 76901 
Frederick, Jr., Austin; (10), district superintendent, Box 

4649, 404 North Glass, Victoria, TX 77903 
Wende, Stephen P. (2), pastor; 5084 DeZavala Road, San 

Antonio, TX 78249 
Smith, Jerry J. (4), assistant to the episcopal office; P.O. Box 

28098, San Antonio, TX 78284 
Lowry,John M. (1), pastor; 7501 South Staples, Corpus 

Christi,TX 78413 



Delegate Information 



63 



Reserves 

Loeb, Carol, retired; 4610 Lomond, Corpus Christi, TX 78413 
Marr, Betty, diaconal minister; 407 North Bridge, Victoria, 

TX 77901 
Brim, Jay, attorney; 4906 Timberline, Austin, TX 78746 
Eubank, Rocky, retired; 3405 Saddlestring Trail, Austin, TX 

78739 
Hand, Donald J., attorney; 3514 Huntwick Lane, San 

Antonio, TX 78230 
Vazquez-Garza, Virgilio, pastor; 1220 McClelland, Laredo, 

TX 78249 
Abraham, William, professor; Perkins School of Theology, 

SMU, Dallas, TX 78275 
Mayfield, James, pastor; P.O. Box 5566, 2601 Exposition, 

Austin, TX 78763 
Schnase, Robert, pastor; Box 1568, 221 North Main, 

McAllen.TX 78505 
Hill, Shirley, pastor; 5247 Vance Jackson, San Antonio, TX 

78230 

Sweden (2) 

Sec. D Row 15 Seatsll-12 

Carlstrom, Berit (3), evangelism secretary; Alnangsgatan 7, 

S-703 62 Orebro, Sweden 
Lindell, Rolf (2), district superintendent; Jutevagen 6, S-554 

45 Jonkoping, Sweden 

Reserves 

Rickardsson, Ulf; Friggatan 7 A, S-411 01 Goteborg, Sweden 
Aim, Beatiice; Box 186, S-170 11 Drottningholm, Sweden 
Eliasson, Ann-Marie; Pilspetsgatan 11, S-723 53 Vasteras, 

Sweden 
Lundgren, Christer; Kittelvagen 40, S-811 37 Sandviken, 

Sweden 
Kjemald, Margareta; Margretelundsgatan 23, S412 67 

Goteborg, Sweden 
Tullhage, Leif, district superintendent; Vasavagen 197 B, 

S-191 76 Sollentuna, Sweden 
Hogberg, Bo, Bible School teacher; Arkitektvagen 1, S-441 

50 Alingsas, Sweden 
Skoldhjonsson, Ulla, district superintendent; Kedjegatan 17, 

S-361 33 Emmaboda, Sweden 
Nausner, Michael, pastor; Kungsgatan 30, S-753 21 Uppsala, 

Sweden 
Englund, Hakan, district superintendent; Metodistkyrkan, 

Kikebogatan, S-572 33 Oskarshamn Sweden 

Switzerland-France (2) 

Sec. B Row 19 Seats 9-10 

Bloem, Claudia A. (1), lawyer; 17 Rte. de Bestigny, CH-1700 

Fribourg, Switzerland 
*Streiff. Patrick Ph. (2), pastor; 11, Rue des Beaux-Arts, 

CH-2000 Neuchatel Switzeriand, 

Reserves 

Welti, Erika, Zwyssigstrasse 6, CH-8048 Zurich, Switzerland 
Baur, Peter, Schwalmerenweg 5, CH-3800 Interlaken, 

Switzerland 
Binder, Peter, Gebhartsti-asse 40, CH-8404 Wnterthur, 

Switzerland 
Nussbaumer, Marc, pastor; Riehenring 129, CH-4058 Basel, 

Switzerland 



Eschbach, Urs, pastor; Eichensh-asse 1, CH-4054 Basel, 
Switzerland 

Tanganyika (2) 

Sec. A Row 11 Seats 9-10 

Kavwala Matanda, Ngoy (7), school director; The United 
Methodist Church, P.O. Box 11237, Chingola, Zambia 

*Kichibi, Mukalayi (4), district superintendent; The United 
Methodist Church, P.O. Box 11237, Chingola, Zambia 

Reserves 

Kitenge Moma, Lusanga, fish project director; The United 
Methodist Church, P.O. Box 11237. Chingola, Zambia 

Ntambo, Mutwale, district superintendent; The United 
Methodist Church, P.O. Box 11237, Chingola, Zambia 

Tennessee (10) 

Sec. B Row 7 Seats 8-12 
Row 8 Seats 8-12 

*Alexander, Betty M. (7), administrator/counselor, 147 

Allen Drive, Hendersonville, TN 37075 
Garcia, Barbara P. (10), diaconal minister; 309 Franklin 

Road, Brentwood, TN 37027 
Williams, Joe (4), attorney; 124 Oak Park, Tullahoma, TN 

37388 
Fisher, Tom (2), engineer; 1729 Wilson Pike, Brentwood, 

TN 37207 
Brown, Kimi (8), customer service representative; P.O. Box 

9,NolensviUe,TN37135 
*King, Jr., James R. (5), pastor, 1014 - 14th Avenue North, 

Nashville, TN 37208 
Pennel, Jr. , Joe E. (9) , pastor, 309 Franklin Road, 

Brentwood, TN 37027 
Wright, Juanita B. (6), district superintendent; P.O. Box 

847, Clarksville,TN 37041 
Alford, Ben R. (3), pastor; 217 East Main Sh-eet, 

Hendersonville, TN 37075 
Mayo, Jerry H. (l), pastor; 220 North Church Sh-eet, 

Murfreesboro,TN 37130 

Reserves 

Bass, James L, attorney; P.O. Box 500, Carthage, TN 37030 
Tanksley, Lem A., engineer; 746 Rodney Drive, Nashville, 

TN 37205 
Locke, Toni L, high school librarian; 117 High Avenue, 

Fayetteville,TN 37334 
Lightner, Roy, advertising; 596 Cumberland Hills Drive, 

Hendersonville, TN 37075 
Lee, Frank T., retired electrical engineer; Route #6, Box 

6692, Manchester, TN 37355 
McGee, Elijah, distinct superintendent; P.O. Box 477, 

Hendersonville, TN 37077 
Clardy, Jr., James; pastor, 84 South Greenhill Road, Mount 

JuUet,TN 37122 
Walkup, Vincent, pastor; 3701 Hillsboro Road, Nashville, TN 

37215 
Collett,John H., pastor; P.O. Box 120098, Nashville, TN 

37212 
Gray, Kay C, pastor; 7919 Lebanon Road, Mount Juliet, TN 

37122 



64 



DCA Advance Edition 



Texas (24) 

Sec. C Row 20 Seats 1-12 
Row21Seatsl-12 

Means, Barbara L. (6), church financial secretary; 1014 

Mariana Drive, Wake Village, TX 75501 
Strickland, Don (5), funeral home owner; P.O. Box 217, 

Somerville,TX 77879 
Smith, Randy (3), lawyer; 58 East Broad Oaks, Houston, TX 

77056 
Andrews, Duane N. (1), physician; 1101 Santa Rosa, Tyler, 

TX 75701 
Hanke, Gilbert C. (3), speech pathologist; 803 Wildwood, 

Nacogdoches, TX 75961 
House, Donald R. (4), economist; 1108 Shady Drive, 

College Station, TX 77840 
Werlein, Jr., Ewing, (4), U.S. District Judge, 515 Rusk 

Avenue, R 9136 Houston, TX 77002 
Montgomery, Samuel (7), retired college registrar; P.O. 

Box 2373, Prairie View, TX 77446 
Palmer, Ruth G. (10), community center director; 2001 

Holcombe Boulevard, #1206, Houston TX 77030 
Hataway, Joan (9), homemaker; 27 Bellchase Gardens, 

Beaumont, TX 77766 
Bryant, Norma L (8), church secretary; 4330 Larkspur, 

Houston, TX 77051-2734 
Robertson, Suzi (2), diaconal minister; 5200 Willowbend 

Boulevard, Houston, TX 77096 
*Moore, James W. (4) , pastor; P.O. Box 22013, Houston, TX 

77227 
Caldwell, Kirbyjon (9), pastor; 6000 Heatherbrook, Houston, 

TX 77085 
Bledsoe, W. Earl (10), pastor; 13403 Cypress-North 

Houston, Cypress, TX 77429 
Albright, John 'Jack' E. (3), pastor; 16000 Rippling Water 

Drive, Houston, TX 77084 
Bankston, L. James (1), pastor; 5501 Main Street, Houston, 

TX 77004 
Hayes, Jr., Robert E. (5), district superintendent, 5215 Main 

Street, Houston, TX 77002-9792 
Hinson, William H. (3), pastor; 1320 Main Street, Houston, 

TX 77002 
Chamness, Ben R. (7) , pastor; 300 West Erwin, Tyler, TX 

75702 
Matthis, Morris F. (4), pastor; 4600 FM 359, Richmond, TX 

77469 
Watt, Sharon M. (6), district superintendent; P.O. Box 3606, 

Beaumont, TX 77704 
Foster, James W. (2), pastor; 20775 Kingsland Boulevard, 

Katy,TX 77450 
Byrd, Julian L. (8), hospital pastoral services and education 

manager; 6464 Fannin, D-102, Houston, TX 77074 

Reserves 

Jackson, Robert M., businessman; 1302 Woodland Park, 

Jasper, TX 75951 
Samuelson, David, physician; 613 Boiling Green, Wharton, 

TX 77488 
Johnson, Mary, homemaker/rancher; Route 1, Box 356, 

Franklin, TX 77856 
Hernandez, Andrew, accountant; 6603 Seinfeld Court, 

Houston, TX 77069 
Sims, Margaret, homemaker; Route 1, Box 374, 

Colmensneil, TX 75938 



McCall, Morris, retired judge/attorney; 825 Oano, Port 

Neches.TX 77651 
Dixon, Floyd, retired; 8630 Shotwell, Houston, TX 77016 
Base, Darlene, church secretary; P.O. Box 389, Hallsville, 

TX 75650 
Krause, Mary Lx)u, retired newspaper editor; 2129 

Southgate, Houston, TX 77030 
Bates, Kathryn, administrative manager; 6331 Coachwood, 

Houston, TX 77035 
Parsons, 111 James N.; lawyer, 730 Range Road, Palestine, 

TX 75801 
Hataway, Bill, marine chemist; 27 Bellechase Gardens, 

Beaumont, TX 77766 
Guidry, Francis E.W., psator; 2812 Milby, Houston, TX 

77004 
Idom,Jr., Matt ; pastor, 416 South Bonner, Jacksonville, TX 

75766 
Smith, Sandra W., pastor; 22801 Aldine Westfield, Spring, 

TX 77373 
Alegria, Frank, pastor; 5203 Fulton, Houston, TX 77009 
Atkinson, George M., pastor; 5200 Willowbend Boulevard, 

Houston, TX 77096 
Stutes, Robert G., pastor; 670 North Fifth, Silsbee. TX 77656 
Booker, R. Jeremiah, pastor; 1501 Jensen Drive, Houston, 

TX 77020 
Whitaker, Keith €., pastor; 805 East Denman, Lufkin, TX 

75901 
Meador, Donald M., district superintendent; P.O. Box 2382, 

Longview, TX 75606 
Crawford, Jim H., conference fiscal officer; 5215 Main 

Street, Houston, TX 77002-9792 
Millikan, Charles R, pastor; 2803 - 53rd Street, Galveston, 

TX 77551 
Dorris, Karen S., pastor; P.O. Box 720722, Houston, TX 

77272 

Troy (6) 

Sec. B Row 20 Seats 7-12 

*Conklin, Brooke (5), volunteer; 7 Carr Road, Saratoga 

Springs, NY 12866 
Readdean, Shirley E. (6), volunteer; 2232 Turner Avenue, 

Schenectady, NY 12306 
Byers, Shirley D. (3), retired speech/language pathologist, 

P.O. Box 603, Nassau, NY 12123 
Perry, James M. (2), council director; P.O. Box 560, Saratoga 

Springs, NY 12866 
Barney, Bill (1), pastor; 10 Lincoln Avenue, Glens Falls, NY 

12801 
Lemmel, Barbara (10), pastor; P.O. Box 426, North Creek, 

NY 12853 

Reserves 

Archibald, Jr., Julius A.; professor, 90 Park Avenue, 

Pittsburgh, NY 12901 
Civalier, Iris A., volunteer; Box 49, Hoffman Road, 

Olmstedville, NY 12857 
Suits, L. David, volunteer; 5 Willoughby Drive, Albany, NY 

12205 
Cotant, William A., pastor; 1 Gilligan Road, East 

Greenbush, NY 12061 
Lasher, William A., pastor; 8 Bog Meadow Run, Saratoga 

Springs, NY 12866 
Crowder, Merry W., pastor; P.O. Box 8074, Essex, VT 05451 



Delegate Information 



65 



Upper Zaire (2) 

Sec. D Row 8 Seats 9-10 

♦Wembudinga, Gilbert U. (6), doctor; P.O. Box 2006, 

Kisangani, Zaire 
Litalema, Bogenda (9), district superintendent; P.O. Box 

2006, Kisangani, Zaire 

Reserves 

Yuhe, Mbundja, principal; P.O. Box 2006, Kisangani, Zaire 
Lopemba, Anker T., Christian education director; P.O. Box 
2006, Kisangani, Zaire 

Virginia (30) 

Sec. C Row 15 Seats 1-12 
Row 16 Seats 1-12 
Row 17 Seats 1-6 

Amon, Darlene V. (3), homemaker; 5128 Stratford Drive, 

Suffolk, VA 23435 
Bishop, Nathaniel L (5), assistant administrator; P.O. Box 

6339, Roanoke, VA 24017 
Baker, Sandra W. (10) , homemaker; 419 West Clifford 

Street, Winchester, VA 22601 
Branscome, James L (4), conference treasurer; P.O. Box 

11367, Richmond, VA 23230 
Whitehurst, Betty C. (6), educator; 159 McGill Boulevard, 

NE, Suite 305, Atlanta, GA 30308 
Carpenter, Jr., Robert B. (4), engineer, P.O. Box 696, 

AltaVista, VA 24517 
Jackson, Ward (3), government service; 21232 Revenwood 

Court, Sterling, VA 22165 
Ravenhorst, Dorothy A (2), homemaker; P.O. Drawer 904, 

Lexington, VA 24450 
Weaver, Michael (6), pilot; 17902 Milroy Drive, Dumfries, 

VA 22026 
Bray, Jr., Jerry G. (7) , retired judge, 3100 Shore Drive, 

Virginia Beach, VA 23451 
Dowdy, Roger C. (9), diaconal minister; 582 Leesville Road, 

Lynchburg, VA 24502 
Hulick, Elizabeth 'Bets/ (8), student; 59 Hampton Road 

Avenue, Hampton, VA 23661 
Park, Yoon S. (1), govenmient service; 2654 Oakton Glen 

Drive, Vienna, VA 22181 
Dowdy, Kristen E. (7), student; Box MWC 1048, 1701 

College Avenue, Fredericksburg, VA 22401 
Douglas, Jr., Willard H. (8), retired judge, 606 Edgehill 

Road, Richmond, VA 23222 
*Chamheriain, Ray W. (3), district superintendent; P.O. Box 

11367, Richmond, VA 23230 
Logan, James C. (7), professor; 11152 Saffold Way, Reston, 

VA 22090 
Bailey, Paul C. (10) , pastor; 19th & Pacific Avenue, Virginia 

Beach, VA 23451 
Wright, Elizabeth A. S. (1), pastor; 151 Wythe Parkway, 

Hampton, VA 23669 
Sheaffer, Lee B. (4), council director; P.O. Box 11367, 

Richmond, VA 23230 
Jackson, Kenneth J. (9), district superintendent; 804-A 

Leesville Road, Lynchburg, VA 24502 
Kim, MyungJ. (9), district superintendent; P.O. Box 429, 

Ashland, VA 23005 
Casey, Robert T. (2), district superintendent; 75 Shoe Lane, 

Newport News, VA 23606 
Hill, L Douglas (2), district superintendent; P.O. Box 3413, 

Petersburg, VA 23805 



Colby, Rhonda V. (6), pastor; 9155 Hungary Road, 

Richmond, VA 23294 
Horton, AlvinJ. (8), CCOM staff; P.O. Box 11367, 

Richmond, VA 23230 
Murphy, Jr, E. Thomas (1), pastor, 250 Franklin Street, 

Harrisonburg, VA 22801 
Smith, Theodore (5), pastor; 500 North Naylor Street, 

Alexandria, VA 22304 
Dillard,Jr, F. Douglas (5), district superintendent, 5001 

Echols Avenue, Alexandria, VA 22311 
Woolridge,Jr., Eugene R. (10), pastor, 903 Forest Avenue, 

Richmond, VA 23229 

Reserves 

Hardman, Ronald L., government service; 214 North 

Edgewood Street, Arlington, VA 22201 
Wolf, Rexford, UM Assembly Center Business 

Administrator; 707 Fourth Street, Blackstone, VA 23824 
Vaughn, Carole, CCOM staff; P.O. Box 11367, Richmond, 

VA 23230 
Abemathy, H. S., retired school administrator; 636 Green 

Valley Drive, Virginia Beach, VA 23462 
Bom, Ethel W., homemaker; 3789 Knollridge Road, Salem, 

VA 24153 
Bergdoll, James R, college vice-president; 4500 Pinebrook 

Court, Virginia Beach, VA 23462 
Powell, Ida B., education consultant; 3809 Manton Lane, 

Lynchburg, VA 24503 
McClung, William L, student; 1619 Linden Avenue, 

Chesapeake, VA 23325 
Miller, L Thomas, retired; 148 Summit Road, DanfiUe, VA 

24540 
Moorefield, Jr., Eugene; corporation vice-president, 1601 

Westover Drive, Danville, VA 24541 
Clarke, Lambuth M., retired college president; 1508 

Buckingham Avenue, Norfolk, VA 23509 
Sizemore, James A., consultant; 704 Spring Valley Drive, 

Fredericksburg, VA 22405 
Cauffman, Shirley, administrative secretary; 4613 North 

41st Street, Arlington, VA 22207 
Huber, Paul W., physicist; 2 Edgewood Drive, Newport 

News, VA 23606 
Webb, Foye W., government executive; 7513 Camp Alger 

Avenue, Falls Church, VA 22042 
Corley, Cynthia A., pastor; 1301 Trap Road, Vienna, VA 22182 
Turbyfill, Margaret A., campus pastor; 204 High Street, 

Farmville,VA 23901 
McAden, Robinson H., pastor; 1301 Collingwood Road, 

Alexandria, VA 22308 
Wright, Jr., Wasena F.\ pastor, 6935 Columbia Pike, 

Annandale.VA 22003 
Riley, Jr., Henry E.; pastor, 308 Hanover Street, 

Fredericksburg, VA 22401 
Peters, John B., pastor; 115 Wolfe Street, Wmchester, VA 

22601 
Whitaker, Timothy W., pastor; 411 East Grace Street, 

Richmond, VA 23219 
Smith, David H, council staff; P.O. Box 11367, Richmond, 

VA 23230 
Espinoza, Samuel J., pastor; 9203 Braddock Road, 

Springfield, VA 22015 
King, Charles B., district superintendent; 301 Fourth 

Avenue, Farmville, VA 23901 
Gillis,Jr., R. Franklin ; pastor, 1645 Buford Road, 

Richmond, VA 23235 
Jarvis, David F. , pastor; 10300 Stratford Avenue, Fairfax, VA 

22030 



66 



DCA Advance Edition 



Talley, Kathryn F., pastor; 10661 Duryea Road, Richmond, 

VA 23235 
Whitehurst, Walter A, Southeastern Jurisdiction VIM 

Director; 159 Ralph McGill Boulevard, NE, Suite 305 

Atlanta, GA 30308 
Barrow, Barbara B., district superintendent; 32 South Gate 

Court, Suite 202, Harrisonburg, VA 22801 

Visayas-North Mindanao Philippines (2) 

Sec. C Row 9 Seats 9-10 

*Alkuino, Aurora S. (3), teacher; Visayas State College of 

Agriculture, Baybay, Leyte, Philippines 
Rosquita, Faustina (6), pastor; United Methodist Church, 

Mabubay, Valencia Bukidnon, Philippines 

Reserves 

Barrera, Miriam A., teacher; Iligan Capitol College, Rexas 

Avenue, 9200 Iligan City, Philippines 
Nual, Carmelina R., businesswoman; United Methodist 

Church, 1 Mortola, Cagayan de Oro, Philippines 
Carlos, Elpidio, businessman; B U S C 0, Bukidnon, 

Philippines 
Cansino, Regina R., teacher; United Methodist Church, 1 

Mortola Street, Cagayan de Oro City, Philippines 
Quemado, Virginia P., teacher; United Methodist church, 

Sumpong, Malayba Bukidnon, Philippines 
Loberiano, Abel, businessman; United Methodist church, 

2nd East, Rosario Heights Iligan City 9200, Philippines 
Russel, Remedies, teacher; VisCA, Baybay, Leyte, 

Philippines 
Pague, Linda, businesswoman; c/o Rev. Joseph Comito, 

14-A Lopez Street, Labangon Cebu City, Philippines 
Carlos, Edward V., student; College of Engineering, 

Silliman University, Dumaguete City, Philippines 
Hechanova, Sharon C., journalist; United Methodist 

Church, 2nd East, Rosario Heights 9200 Iligan City, 

Philippines 
Hembrador, Phoebe L, retired teacher; United Methodist 

Church, 1 Mortola Street, Cagayan de Oro City, 

Philippines 
Pague, Loreto, retired teacher; United Methodist Church, 

Sta. Cruz Plaridel, Mis. Occidental, Philippines 
Cruz, Remegio F., farmer; c/o Rev. Samuel Miguel, United 

Methodist Church, Kalilangan Bukidnon, Philippines 
Valderama, Mamita C, deaconess; United Methodist 

Church, 2nd East, Rosario Heights 9200 Iligan City, 

Philippines 
Villanueva, Myma G., pastor; Calvary Bible School, 

Buenavista, Guimaras Is. Iloile, Philippines 
Valderama, Noe C, pastor; First United Methodist Church, 

2nd East Road, Rosario Heights Iligan City, Philippines 
Macadenden, Benjamin A., pastor; United Methodist 

Church, No. 1 Mortola Street, Cagayan de Oro, 

Philippines 
Miguel, Samuel, pastor; United Methodist Church, 

Kalilangan, Bukidnon, Philippines 
Ferrer, Rufino, pastor; c/o Rev. Kwak Choon Shik, P.O. Box 

60, Dumaguete City, Philippines 
Olpindo, Jonathan D., pastor; United Methodist Church, 1 

Mortola Street, Cagayan de Oro, Philippines 
Cabotaje, Amante, pastor; c/o Dr. Esther M. Cabotaje, 

Central Mindanao State University, Musuan Bukidnon, 

Philippines 
Cosmiano, David, pastor; c/o Mrs. Aurora Alkuino, VisCA, 

Baybay Leyte, Philippines 



Comito, Joseph, pastor; United Methodist Church, 14-A 

Lopez Street, Labangon Cebu City, Philippines 
Maregmen, Maximino, pastor; c/o Rev. Joseph Comito, 14-A 

Lopez Street Labangon Cebu City, Philippines 
Manuel, Rodrigo, pastor; United Methodist Church, Melave, 

Zamboanga Sur, Philippines 
Tibalbag, Roy, pastor; United Methodist Church, 1 Mortola 

Street, Cagayan de Oro City, Philippines 
Lapac, Jose, pastor; c/o Rev. Joseph Comito, 14-A Lopez, 

Labangon Cebu City, Philippines 
Pegalan, Mario, pastor; United Methodist Church, Sta. 

Cruz, Plaridel Mis. Occ, Philippines 
Ramos, Imelda, pastor; United Methodist Church, 14-A 

Lopez Street, Labangon Cebu City, Philippines 

West Michigan (10) 

Sec. B Row 10 Seats 1-10 

Becker, Gene R. (9), lay minister; 738 North Pine River, 

Ithaca, MI 48847 
Lett, Steven T. (5), attorney; 3519 Christine Drive, Lansing, 

MI 48911 
Archambeau, Tmdy M. (3), writer; 4001 Stabler, Lansing, 

MI 48910 
Spachman, Amy L (7), student; 175 North Drive, Sheperd, 

MI 48883 
Williams, Donald (8), professor; 5226 Forest View Court, 

Hudsonville, MI 49426 
*Boehm, James W. (1), district superintendent; 2141 

Parkview Avenue, Kalamazoo, MI 49008 
McReynolds, Russell F. (6), pastor; 153 North Wood Street, 

Battle Creek, MI 49017 
Moore, Joy J (10), pastor; 10 West Bidwell, Battle Creek, MI 

49015 
Huston, Joseph D. (2), pastor; P.O. Box 168, Holt, MI 48842 
Brubaker, Ellen A. (4), pastor; 4301 Ambrose N.E., Grand 

Rapids, MI 49505 

Reserves 

Wiltse, David A., graphic arts director; P.O. Box 6247, 

Grand Rapids, MI 49516 
Sheldon, Frank E., retired; Box 445, Portage, MI 49081-0455 
Kelsey, Joan T., volunteer; 1879 Cahill Drive, East Lansing, 

MI 48823 
Fleming, Christina J., student; 1209 South Clinton Drive, 

Charlotte, MI 48813 
Sprague, Mary B., teacher; 2124 East Lake Mitchell Drive, 

Cadillac, MI 49601 
Holier, Laurie A., pastor; 227 East Fulton Street, Grand 

Rapids, MI 49503 
Heisler, Benton R., pastor; 2200 Lake Lansing Road, 

Lansing, MI 48912 
Buwalda, Dennis G., district superintendent; 1670 Barlow 

Sti-eet, Traverse City, MI 49686 
Selleck, Richard A. , pastor; 45 Sbrth Sti-eet, P.O.Box 97, 

Sand Lake, MI 49343 
Pier-Fitzgerald, Lynn, pastor; 214 Spencer N.E., Grand 

Rapids, MI 49505 

West Middle Philippines (2) 

Sec. C Row 5 Seats 11-12 

Magno, Elvira; The United Methodist Church, Palauig, 

Zambales, Philippines 
Fernando, Ruben, pastor; The United Methodist Church, 

Cabangan, Zambales, Philippines 



Delegate Information 



67 



Reserves 

Reyes, Gilbert; The United Methodist Church, Ascomo, 

Guagua Pampanga, Philippines 
Magtanong, Ricardo, pastor; 204 Valdez Street, Marisol 

Village, Angeles City 2009, PhiUppines 

West Ohio (30) 

Sec. D Row 17 Seats 1-12 
Row 18 Seats 1-12 
Row 19 Seats 1-4 

Rhonemus, Alfred C. (1), retired teacher; 9822 Bradysville 

Road, Aberdeen, OH 45101 
Connolly, Phillip F. (10), contractor; P.O. Box 271, 

Marysville, OH 43040 
Mallory, Gabrielle G. (1), student; 1211 Mt. Vernon Avenue, 

Dayton, OH 45405 
Nibbelink, Jim (5), manager; 934 Hidden Ridge Drive, 

Milford, OH 45150 
Gerhard, June A. (9), homemaker; 8891 Charington Court, 

Pickerington, OH 43147 
Bales, Linda (6), human services planner; 3698 Winston 

Churchill, Dayton, OH 45432 
Bradley, Carol Ann (10), diaconal minister; 48 East North 

Broadway, Columbus, OH 43214 
Lutz, Benis (4), retired school superintendent; 641 West 

Main Street, AshviUe, OH 43103 
Johnson, Thelma L (5), retired manager; 5915 Desmond 

Street, Cincinnati, OH 45227 
Walker, Jr., Robert C. (3) , student, 4516 College View Drive, 

Dayton, OH 45427 
Fitch, Marion 0. (2), retired financial officer; 1039 Russ 

Road, Greenville, OH 45331 
Darst, Betty (6), educational technology administrator; 2423 

Brown Bark Drive, Dayton, OH 45431 
Galloway, Mary Ann (9) , school nurse; 121 Franklin Street, 

South Point, OH 45680 
Abrams, Geraldine (8), retired contracting officer; 1431 

Trade Square West (D), Troy, OH 45373 
Potter, Helen E. (4), homemaker; 258 East Floyd Avenue, 

Dayton, OH 45415 
*Atha, Grayson (10), pastor; 299 King Avenue, Columbus, 

OH 43201 
Sprague, C. Joseph (5), pastor; 48 East North Broadway, 

Columbus, OH 43214 
Brooks, Philip D. (1), pastor; 5125 Drake Road, Cincinnati, 

OH 45243 
Ling, Stanley T. (2), council director; 32 Wesley Drive, 

Worthington, OH 43085 
Beveridge, RaeLynn Schlief (10), pastor; 5757 Starr Avenue, 

Oregon, OH 43616 
Slaughter, Michael B. (3), pastor; 6759 South County Road 

25A, Tipp City, OH 45371 
Stover, Gregory D. (3), pastor; 3751 Creek Road, Cincinnati, 

OH 45241 
Mines, William A. (6), pastor; 800 South Main Street, 

Findlay, OH 45840 
Clark, Jr., Russell M. (9), district superintendent, 150 Myrtle 

Avenue, Newark, OH 43055 
Hausman, Sharon A. (2), pastor; 45422 Pomeroy Pike, 

Racine, OH 45771 
Wilson, L Cean (7), district superintendent; 1201 Red Oak 

Circle, Cridersville, OH 45806 
Mallory, Margaret M. (8), pastor; 1516 Salem Avenue, 
Dayton, OH 45406 



Waugh, James E. (8), district superintendent; 47 Johnson 

Road, Box 67, The Plains OH,45780 
Kelso, Scott T. (7), pastor; 13475 Tollgate Road, 

Pickerington, OH 43147 
Frazer, E. Eugene (4), pastor; 1581 Cambridge Boulevard, 

Columbus, OH 43212 

Reserves 

Krill, Caryl, homemaker; 05696 Kramer Road, Route 1, Box 

322 Edgerton, OH 43517 
Hoffman, David L, student; 3476 Hillman Ford Road, 

Morral, OH 43337 
Roper, Jocelyn M., associate council director; 32 Wesley 

Drive, Worthington, OH 43085 
Walker, Sr., Robert C; community center director, 4516 

College View Drive, Dayton, OH 45427 
Wood, Anita, diaconal minister; 110 West Franklin Street, 

Troy, OH 45373 
Nesbitt, Quentin, data processing CEO; One Tanglewood 

Lane, Cincinnati, OH 45224 
Compton, Philip W., professor; 0475 Township Road 30, 

Ada, OH 45810 
Miesse, Helen, homemaker; 4115 Karl Road, #210, 

Columbus, OH 43224 
Weston, Jr., Charles H.; retired public administrator, 711 

Hayden Park Drive, Columbus, OH 43219 
Moore, John E., retired government personnel director; 23 

ICimberly Circle, Dayton, OH 45408 
Elliot, Patricia, student; 146 East Maple, Box 66, North 

Lewisburg, OH 43060 
Loudner, Bonnie L, diaconal minister; 450 West Alex-Bell 

Road, Dayton, OH 45459 
Hill, Martha, student; 263 Senator Place, Cincinnati, OH 

45220 
Watkins, Richard, retired teacher; P.O. Box 56, Ridgeville 

Comers, OH 43555 
Schlicher, Nancy L, retired office manager; 381 Green Vista 

Drive, Enon, OH 45323 
Summers, Jr, Vance ; pastor, 256 William Street, Bowling 

Green, OH 43402 
Campbell, J Gary, pastor; 1610 - 28th Street, Portsmouth, 

OH 45662 
Edgar, John W., pastor; 1480 Zettler Road, Columbus, OH 

43227 
Miller, Sue Ellen, pastor; 3330 Cleveland Avenue, 

Columbus, OH 43224 
Chambers, Chester V., district superintendent; 1421 Sixth 

Street, Findlay, OH 45840 
Broum, George S., pastor; 3460 Epworth Avenue, Cincinnati, 

OH 45211 
Cooper, K. Jeannette', pastor; P.O. Box 2660, Toledo, OH 

43606 
Bauserman, Ralph £., pastor; 10530 Township Road 56, Mt. 

Perry, OH 43760 
Osbom,John P., district superintendent; 632 Vine Street, 

Room 315, Cincinnad, OH 45202 
Chow, W. Jing pastor; P.O. Box 634, Waynesville, OH 45068 
Rudisill, Maria Jean, director of church and community 

ministries; 601 West Riverview Avenue, Dayton, OH 

45406 
Johnson, Michael £>., district superintendent; 471 East Broad 

Street, Room 1102, Columbus, OH 43215 
Gam, CyndyL, pastor; 5100 Karl Road, Columbus, OH 

43229 
Han, Sang-Hyu, pastor; 208 Heischman Road, Worthington, 

OH 43085 



68 



DCA Advance Edition 



Cadle, Shirley K, district superintendent; 61 East Main, 
Suite 1, Box 310, Wilmington, OH 45177-0310 

West Virginia (16) 

Sec.ARow21 Seats 1-10 
Row 22 Seats 1-6 

Deal, William S. (3), university administrator; 2208 Circle 

Drive, Milton, WV 25541-1004 
Nutter, Judy A. (6) , homemaker; HC 39, Box 123B, St 

Mary's, WV 26170 
Nutter, Randy P. (4), mathematics teacher; HC 39, Box 

123B, St Mary's, WV 26170 
Knight Suzanne P. (10), church musician/homemaker; 23 

Latham Street, Buckhannon, WV 26201 
Hairston, William I. (5), management consultant; P.O. Box 

4466, Charleston, WV 25364 
Elkins, Lyman E. (9), retired assistant general yardmaster; 

3703 Norwood Road, Huntington, WV 25705 
Lacaria, J. F. (1), conference council diaconal associate; 

P.O. Box 2313, Charleston, WV 25328 
Wigel, Betty L. (2), self employed; 300 Crestview Drive, 

Charleston, WV 25302 
*Hallett. Helga P. (10), district superintendent; P.O. Box 

866, Charleston, WV 25323 
Bickerton, Thomas]. (5), pastor; P.O. Box 156, Hurricane, 

WV 25526 
Waters, Dale C. (3), pastor; 210 West Philadelphia Drive, 

Bridgeport, WV 26330 
Wright, Richard L (7), pastor; 503 High Street, 

Morgantown, WV 26505 
McCauley, Ronald M. (6), pastor; 415 Lawnview Drive, 

Morgantown, WV 26505 
Turner-Lacy, Nathaniel L (9), district superintendent; 213 

South Heber Street, Beckley, WV 25801 
Jarrett, Sue C. (2), district superintendent; P.O. Box 547, 

Sutton, WV 26601 
Mason, John A. (1), pastor; 1400 Myers Avenue, Dunbar, 

WV 25064 

Reserves 

Underwood, Cecil H., industrial research park chair; 609- 

13th Avenue, Huntington, WV 25701 
Gordon, Betty S., project consultant 643 Rockbridge Street 

Bluefield.WV 24701 
Simmons, Jennifer J., student; 1392 Bennett Drive, 

Morgantown, WV 26505 
Spencer, Eugene P., full time supply pastor; P.O. Box 346, 

Lava]ette,WV 25535 
Flynn, Shirley E., council associate director; 809 Montrose 

Drive, South Charleston, WV 25302 
Sleeth, James R., retired engineer; Star Route, Pullman, WV 

26241 
Lowther, Mary V., council diaconal assistant P.O. Box 3981, 

Charleston, WV 25339 
Dodd, Jr., Chester (C), retired, P.O. Box 47, Spencer, WV 

25276 
Ross, Vance P., General Board of Discipleship staff; P.O. 

Box 840, Nashville, TN 37202-0840 
Jarvis, Patricia A., pastor; 318 College Avenue, Bluefield, 

WV 24701 
Hensley, Basil A., pastor; 315 Kerens Avenue, Elkins, WV 

26241 
Jenkins, Harry R, district superintendent 938 Pine Hill 

Drive, Fairmont WV 26554 



Beard, Clyde W., district superintendent P.O. Box 457, 

Huntington, WV 25504 
Tucker, A. Arthur, pastor; 125 Kruger Street, Elm Grove, 

WV 26003 
Jasper, David E., pastor; 203 Caoerton Avenue, Princeton, 

WV 24740 
Conley, Ellis E., pastor; 88 South Kanawha Street 

Buckhannon, WV 26201 

West Zaire (2) 

Sec. A Row 11 Seats 11-12 

*Poy, Emundu (2), doctor; 2867 Av. Ecuries, 

Kinshasa/Ngaliema, Zaire 
Sendwe, Ilunga (7), district superintendent; 2867 Av. 

Ecuries, Kinshasa/Ngaliema, Zaire 

Reserves 

Ayaki, Andjadiumi, women's leader; 2867 Av. Ecuries, 

Kinshasa/Ngaliema, Zaire 
Kemha, Djamba, pastor; 2867 Av. Ecuries, 

Kinshasa/Ngaliema, Zaire 

Western Angola (4) 

Sec. B Row 12 Seats 11-12 
Row 13 Seats 11-12 

*Marques, Regina (4), nurse; Caixa Postal 68, Luanda, 

Angola 
Quibonda, Francisco (9), student Caixa Postal 68, Luanda, 

Angola 
Zumo, Afonso (2), district superintendent Cafaca Postal 68, 

Luanda, Angola 
Gomes, Antonia Z. (6), pastor; Cabca Postal 68, Luanda, 

Angola 

Reserves 

Caspar, Miguel, teacher; Cabca Postal 68, Luanda, Angola 
Luis, Segunda, merchant; Cabca Postal 68, Luanda, Angola 
Lourenco, Engracia A, housewife; Caixa Postal 68, Luanda, 

Angola 
da Cruz, Bemarda, analyst Cabca Postal 68, Luanda, Angola 
Vinte e Cinco, Gabriel, pastor; Cabca Postal 68, Luanda, 

Angola 
Afonso, Eduardo, pastor; Cabca Postal 68, Luanda, Angola 
Neto, EvalinaJ., pastor; Cabca Postal 68, Luanda, Angola 
da Silva, Elvira M., student Cabca Postal 68, Luanda, Angola 

Western New York (6) 

Sec. A Row 19 Seats 1-6 

Bank, Genie S. (3), volunteer; 243 Randwood Drive, Buffalo, 

NY 14221 
Wright, Betty (2), retired; 104 John Street, Akron, NY 14001 
Richardson, Gerald (10), alcoholism program specialist 

1217 Delaware Avenue, Apt 904, Buffalo, NY 14209 
*Cleveland,J. Fay (4), pastor; 75 East Avenue, Lockport NY 

14094 
Cooke, John D. (5), pastor; 357 Main Street, East Aurora, NY 

14052 
Cronin, Deborah K. (9), district superintendent; 131 North 

Ninth Street, Olean, NY 14760 



Delegate Information 



69 



Reserves 

Bueg, Donald J., salesman; 215 Northwood Avenue, East 

Rochester, NY 14445 
Vineyard, George D., retired veterinarian; 99 Gardeau Road, 

Perry, NY 14530 
Navas, John M., teacher; 1746 Eggert Road, Amherst, NY 

14226 
Stengel, Cathy Hall, pastor; 927 Gwinn Street. Medina, NY 

14103 
VanDussen, D. Gregory, pastor; 25 Hazard Parkway, Albion, 

NY 14411 
Baird, Larry R., pastor; 10171 Greiner Road, Clarence, NY 

14031 

Western North Carolina (28) 

Sec. A Row 15 Seats 1-12 
Row 16 Seats 1-12 
Row 17 Seats 14 

Rinehart, Joetta F. (2), jurisdiction development director, 

605 Harrell Drive, Lake Junaluska, NC 28745 
Clapp, Sylvia L (9), homemaker; 260 Clapp Farms Road, 

Greensboro, NC 27405 
BlackweU, Roberta E. (3), retired; 2827 LaSalle Street, 

Charlotte, NC 28216 
Young, Jack (8) , salesman; 1008 Westwood Avenue, High 

Point, NC 27262 
Causby, Jimmy (5), automobile dealer; 810 Bethel Road, 

Morganton, NC 28655 
DeMarcus, Jamima P. (5), interior designer; 510 South 

Main Street, China Grove, NC 28023 
Gibson, Mildred W. (6), homemaker/volunteer; P.O. Box 

66, Richfield, NC 28137 
Mims, L F. (Harry) (6), retired; 2925 Club Drive, Gastonia, 

NC 28054 
Harrell, Sr., James A.; (2), dentist, 108G Parkwood Drive, 

Elkin.NC 28621 
Mauney, Jimmy H. (3), retired; 4256 Bramble Bush Court, 

Clemmons, NC 27012 
Erwin, Max G. (7), retired; 3025 Imperial Drive, Gastonia, 

NC 28054 
Tyler, Ann (10), retired diaconal minister; 150 1-E Lansdale 

Drive, Charlotte, NC 28205 
Howie, Bill F. (1), retired; 4617 Pleasant Grove Road, 

Waxhaw, NC 28173 
Eurey, Charles W. (4), businessman; 1010 South Aspen 

Street, Uncolnton, NC 28092 
*McCleskey,J. Lawrence (10), pastor, P.O. Box 6161, 

Charlotte, NC 28207 
White, Jr, Charles (Denny) D.; (4), conference secretary, 

P.O. Box 18005, Charlotte, NC 28218 
Queen. Dolores B. (10), district superintendent; P.O. Box 

2311, Salisbury, NC 28145 
Langfordlll, Thomas (Andy) A. (5), pastor, P.O. Box 625, 

China Grove, NC 28023 
Wilson, Jr, Earl ; (1), district superintendent, 4108 Park 

Road, Suite 101 Charlotte, NC 28209 
Christy, Jr, John H.; (9), pastor, 311 Third Avenue N.E., 

Hickory, NC 28601 
Aldridge, Jr., Julian M; (9), pastor, P.O. Box 5289, High 

Point, NC 27262 
Bales, Harold K. (3) , conference director of ministries; P.O. 

Box 18005, Charlotte, NC 28218 
Alvord, Alec M. (6) , conference director of 

missions/outreach; P.O. Box 18005, Charlotte, NC 28218 



Wilkinson, Larry D. (4), district superintendent; P.O. Box 

426, Lake Junaluska, NC 28745 
Lewis, Patricia A. (2) , district superintendent P.O. Box 367, 

North Wilkesboro, NC 28659 
Vun Cannon, L. Lewis (8), administrative assistant to the 

bishop; P.O. Box 18005, Charlotte, NC 28218 
Rankin, Nancy Burgin (8), pastor; 30 Union Street, North, 

Concord, NC 28025 
Brown, Michael B. (7), pastor; 27 Church Street, Asheville, 

NC 28001 

Reserves 

Kelley, Erin E., student; 320 Jim Parker Road, Monroe, NC 

28110 
Mercier, Anna M., student; 218 Pine Valley Road, 

MocksviUe, NC 27028 
Barden, Barbara S., diaconal minister; P.O. Box 146, New 

London, NC 28127 
Marcellus, Etta W., retired; 311 North Washington Avenue, 

ReidsviUe, NC 27320 
Tharpe, Nina S., homemaker; P. 0. Box 3, Ronda, NC 28670 
Kim, In Muk, businessman; 2038 Fox Run Road, 

BurUngton, NC 27215 
Windham, Jr., James C; attorney, P.O. Box 995, Gastonia, 

NC 28053 
Collins, Janet H., retired; 500 Lakeshore Drive, Lake 

Junaluska, NC 28745 
Shepherd, Robert E., government service; 923 Sand Hill 

Road, AsheviUe, NC 28806 
Kizer, Mary K., sales/management; 7140 Lakeside Drive, 

Charlotte, NC 28215 
Streetman, Charles (Bud) E., retired; 4013 Hough Road, 

Charlotte, NC 28209 
Key, Jewell C, corporate manager; 1930 Lodgecrest Lane, 

Pfafftown, NC 27040 
Carmichael, M. Susan, retired diaconal minister/deaconess; 

P.O. Box 561, Misenheimer, NC 28109 
Christy, Betty C, gift shop owner; P.O. Box 1247, 

Kannapolis, NC 28082 
Hardin, Jr., E. Wownamaifeer ; district superintendent, 1031 

Reynolda Road, Wmston-Salem, NC 27104 
Young, C. Garland, pastor; P.O. Box 870, Greensboro, NC 

27402 
Brown, Jr, Andrew l^.; district superintendent, P.O. Box 

4523, Greensboro, NC 27404 
Seymour, Jr, Joseph (Jody) C; pastor, P.O. Box 218, 

Gastonia, NC 28053 
Thompson, George E., pastor; 410 North Holden Road, 

Greensboro, NC 27410 
Stith III, Frank A. , pastor; 1207 West Dixon Boulevard, 

Shelby, NC 28152 
Gilland,Jim C, pastor; 2810 Providence Road, Charlotte, 

NC 28211 
Sherrill, Katherine C, pastor; 4814 Zephyr Lane, Charlotte, 

NC 28209 
Blackburn, Jr, Robert M.\ pastor, P.O. Box 838, Waynesville, 

NC 28786 
Howie, Richard A., district superintendent; P.O. Box 4158, 

Archdale, NC 27263 
Sigmon, Thomas R, district superintendent; 166 East Main 

Avenue, Gastonia, NC 28052 
Stadler,Jr, Leonard E.; pastor, 13901 Providence Road, 

Matthews, NC 28105 
Robinson, George P., pastor; P.O. Box 658, Wmston-Salem, 

NC 27102 
Clinard, Hubert C, retired; 2224 Cardinal Loop, Stanley, NC 

28164 



70 



DCA Advance Edition 



Western Pennsylvania (20) 

Sec. D Row 14 Seats 1-12 
Row 15 Seats 1-8 

Merrick, Tracy (4), bank vice-president; 5472 Patton Street, 

Erie, PA 16509 
Ernst, Sally (5), retired nurse; 3240 Post Gate Road, Bethel 

Park, PA 15102 
Morris, Patricia (3), auto dealership controller; 1318 Eighth 

Avenue, Beaver Falls, PA 15010 
Yannayon, Harold (2), manufacturing vice-president; 2926 

Homer Avenue, Erie, PA 16506 
White, Chris (1), student; R.R 2, Box 122, Eldred, PA 16731 
Walker, Dorothy (9), conference staff; 204 Timothy Drive, 

Elizabeth, PA 15037 
Grey, Thelma (8), retired church secretary; 112 McClelland 

Drive, Rochester, PA 15074 
Hershberger, Nyle (10), educator; 318 Kerr Drive, 

Johnstown, PA 15904 
Plowman, Jack W. (7), attorney; 1025 Lakemont Drive, 

Pittsburgh, PA 15243 
Gray, Eileen (6), homemaker; Box 237, Dayton, PA 16222 
* Weaver, Peter D. (5), pastor; Center & South Aiken 

Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15232 
Kincaid, Sr.,J. LaVon ; (2), district superintendent, P.O. 

Box 17488, Pittsburgh, PA 15235 
Twigg, Aimee W. (9), pastor; 434 Main Street, Latrobe, PA 

15650 
Greenway, Jeffrey E. (3) , pastor; 2571 West 32nd Street, Erie, 

PA 16506 
Kohlhepp, Glenn B. (4), pastor; 136 North Richhill Street, 

Waynesburg, PA 15370 
Potter-Miller, Jaime (7), district superintendent; 200 

Bloomfield Street, Johnstown, PA 15904 
Miller, John D. (10), executive director; P.O. Box 8, Ludlow, 

PA 16333 
Rhodes, Arnold A. (6), district superintendent; 5 South Park 

Avenue, Kane, PA 16735 
Bauknight, Brian K. (1), pastor; 44 Highland Road, Bethel 

Park, PA 15102 
Garrett, Joel S. (8), pastor; 191 East Highland Drive, 

McMurray, PA 15317 

Reserves 

Donner, James L, retired engineer; 405 Indiana Drive, Erie, 

PA 16505 
Hamley, Scott, student; Box 615, Belle Vernon, PA 15012 
Hawke, Marybelle, retired nurse; 247 Creek Drive, Slippery 

Rock, PA 16057 
Schall, Dan, cable franchise assistant manager; 110 Ziegler 

Street, Zelienople, PA 16063 
Kamara, Abass, student; 5512 Avondale Place, Pittsburgh, 

PA 15206 
Patterson, Dottie, homemaker; 500 Oak Hill Drive, Grove 

City, PA 16127 
Handy, Doris M., retired social worker; 101 North 

Dithridge, #1101, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 
Alwine, Betty, seamstress; R.R 2, Box 385, Holsapple, PA 

15035 
Harr, Bonnie D., hospital spiritual care coordinator; RD #5, 

Box 241, Latrobe, PA 15650 
Beers, Sally J., homemaker; RD #1, Box 496-A, Saegertown, 

PA 16433 
Chambers, Linda B., pastor; 230 College Street, Youngsville, 

PA 16371 



Schwab, Sharon L, pastor; R.R 2, Box 431, Worthington, PA 

16262 
Orphe, Martha M., executive director; 1420 Centre Avenue, 

Apt. #1413, Pittsburgh, PA 15219 
Crocker, Hugh D., retired; 611 Ridgeway Avenue, Grove 

City, PA 16127 
Harvey, Andrew C. , pastor; 3319 West liberty Avenue, 

Pittsburgh, PA 15216 
Hipwell, Ronald J, pastor; 200 East North Street, Butler, PA 

16001 
Emmett, Mary Grey, district superintendent; 201 West 

Beaver Street, Zelienople, PA 16063 
Meuschke, Paul J., retired; 4185 Ivanhoe Drive, Monroeville, 

PA 15146 
Ackley-Killian, Deborah L, pastor; 130 East Meyer Avenue, 

New Castle, PA 16105 
Funk, Thomas L, district superintendent; 4523 Wood 

Street, Erie, PA 16509 

Wisconsin (12) 

Sec. C Row 12 Seats 1-12 

*Rodriguez, Phyllis R. (4), stewardship consultant; P.O. Box 

119, MorrisonviUe, WI 53571 
Kindschi, Rik (1), student; 318 Epworth Avenue, Wilmore, 

KY 40390 
Grain, Judy (8), volunteer; 718 Cass Street, Green Bay, WI 

54301 
Thompson, Odell (6), professional volunteer; 1740 Sbrth 

Street, Beloit,WI 53511 
Winston, Joseph M. (2), administrator; 3291 North 36th 

Street, Milwaukee, WI 53212 
Fang, Marcus (5), professor; 1700 Church Street, Stevens 

Point, WI 53581 
Alford, Joyce L. (6), district superintendent; 2231 East 

Luther Road, Janesville, WI 53545 
Bartel, Bruce A. (3), pastor; 212 Fourth Avenue, P.O. Box 

37, Onalaska, WI 54650 
Jones, Richard H (9) , pastor; 819 East Silver Spring Drive, 

Whitefish Bay, WI 53217 
Foster, S. Stephen (10), pastor; 1025Tullar Road, Neenah, 

WI 54956 
Burwell, Susanne L. (1), pastor; 5200 South 48th Street, 

Greenfield, WI 53220 
Deming,Joan C. (7),pastor;203 Wisconsin Avenue, 

Madison, WI 53703 

Reserves 

Good, Mary Hicks, associate council director; P.O. Box 620, 

Sun Prairie, WI 53590 
Spinti, Robert J., retired professor; Box 386, Menomonie, 

WI 54751 
White, William F., attorney; 2709 Lakeland Avenue, 

Madison, WI 53704 
Mueller, Michael, park ranger/bee farmer; 1234 County 

Road B, Montfort, WI 53569 
Christoph, Gerry B., homemaker/volunteer; 2451 Brenner 

Place, Green Bay, WI 54301 
Beilke, Nancy C, homemaker; 401 - 19th Avenue West, 

Menomonie, WI 54751 
Gaylord, Frank R., pastor; 121 Wisconsin Avenue, 

Waukesha, WI 53186 
Bethke, Christine A. , pastor; 700 West Linwood Avenue, 

Oshkosh, WI 54901 
Nolla, Jaime, district superintendent; P.O. Box 620, Sun 

Prairie, WI 53590 



Delegate Information 



71 



mite. Wesley/., pastor; 819 East High Street, Milton, WI 

53563 
Smith, Vclma. pastor; 3438 North 24th Street, Milwaukee, 

WI 53206 
Gamhart, Thomas 0., pastor; 5109 Washington Avenue, 

Racine, WI 53406 

Wyoming (6) 

Sec. B Row 12 Seats 1-6 

Anderson, Gail 0. (7), associate council director; 84 Miner 

Street, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702-1722 
Earl, Dorothy M. (6), retired; 14 Academy Street, Windsor, 

m 13865 
Scott, Gail F. (3), conference treasurer; 621 Leon Drive, 

Endicott, NY 13760 
*Miller, Sarah S. (4), pastor; 22 Hinds Street, Montrose, PA 

18801 
Topolewskijohn L (10), district superintendent; 1 Circle 

Drive, Sidney, NY 13838 
Duncan, Jean-Pierre (1), pastor; 224 South Blakely Street, 

Dunmore, PA 18512 



Reserves 

Hamill, Raymond L, attorney; R.R. 3, Box 1357, Honesdale, 

PA 18431 
Summers, Jr., Kenneth T.; retired, 201 Evergreen Street, 

4-3FVestal, NY 13850 
Bama, David S., transportation analyst; 904 McFall Road, 

Apalachin, NY 13732 
Clark, Janet B., pastor; P.O. Box 355, Apalachin, NY 

13732-0355 
Bouton, William D., pastor; 66 Chestnut Street, Oneonta, 

NY 13820 
Reid, William W., retired pastor; R.R. 2, Box 143, 

Tunkhannock, PA 18657 

Yellowstone (2) 

Sec. B Row 14 Seats 11-12 

*Doyle, Lin (1), teacher/rancher; Box 8, Hyattville, WY 

82428 
Boiler, nomas R. (4), district superintendent; 335 

Broadwater Avenue, Billings, MT 59101 

Reserves 

Marshall, Linda, diaconal minister; 2800 Fourth Avenue 

Nordi, Billings, MT 59101 
Witman,Jan S., pastor; Box 6303, Great Falls, MT 59405 



Create Church for 
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the Christian Movement," and "How Apostolic Churches Reach 
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Cincinnati, Ohio 




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72 



DCA Advance Edition 



Membership of Legislative Committees 

for the 1996 General Conference 

of The United Methodist Church 



Standing Legislative Committee (1) 
Rooms A 109/111 

Church and Society 

Ackerson, Merlin, J. Iowa 

Alsted, Christian Denmark 

Andrews, Duane, N Texas 

Baker, Lynn, R. North Arkansas 

Baldridge, Mary Baltimore-Washington 

Banks, David, A North Carolina 

Bankston, L, James Texas 

Barney, Bill Troy 

Bauknight, Brian, K. Western Pennsylvania 

Bloem, Claudia, A. Switzerland-France 

Boe, Donna, H Oregon-Idaho 

Boehm, James, W. West Michigan 

Brooks, Philip, D West Ohio 

Burwell, Susanne, L Wisconsin 

Campbell, Rufits, R. Minnesota 

Campbell-Marshall, Linda New England 

Capen, Beth New York 

Capistrano, Melanio, R. Bulacan Philippines 

Case, Martin, A Mississippi 

Chattin, TerriRae Baltimore-Washington 

Coyner, Michael, J. North Indiana 

Davis, Judy Rocky Mountain 

Dawes, Inez Iowa 

Day, R. Randy New York 

Deal, Pat, M North Texas 

Dillard, Kay, B. Northern Illinois 

Dillon, C. A. North Carolina 

DiPaolo, Joseph Eastern Pennsylvania 

Doyle, lin ... Yellowstone" 

Duger, Sharon, L North Central New York 

Duncan, Jean-Pierre Wyoming 

Dyck, Sally East Ohio 

Fischer, Bemd, D German South 

Fukomoto, Jo Ann, Y California-Pacific 

Gray, Jon, R Missouri West 

Harman, Christine Louisville 

Harris, Joseph, L. Oklahoma 

Hayenga, Mary Dakotas 

Hefley, Chuck, E North Indiana 

Holt, Gloria North Alabama 

Hopson, Roger, A Memphis 

Hoshibata, Robert, T. Pacific Northwest 

Howie, Bill, F Western North Carolina 

Hutchinson, Charles, L South Indiana 

Ilunga, Kaseya North Shaba 

Jarrett, Joseph, AM. Sierra Leone 

Junk, Tom, M Oklahoma 

Kapend, Musumb Southern Zaire 

Kinchaloe, Beatrice Holston 

Kindschi, Rik Wisconsin 

Knight, Margaret, F North Georgia 

Lacaria,J., F West Virginia 

Ladia, Roberto Mindanao Philippines 



Lawson, Jr., James, M. California-Pacific 

Lehman, Donald, A. Alabama-West Florida 

Lenge, Kasongo North Shaba 

Lorico, Samuel, J Bicol Philippines Provisional 

Lowry, John, M. Southwest Texas 

Lupaka, Tshita Central Zaire 

Mallory, Gabrielle, G West Ohio 

Mason, John, A West Virginia 

Mayo, Jerry, H. Tennessee 

Montgomery, Darlene, T Kansas East 

Mooneyhan, James, B. North Georgia 

Muchopa, Naboth Great Britain 

Murphy, Jr., E. Thomas Virginia 

Nbcon, Harold, D Northwest Texas 

Norton, Richard little Rock 

Oglesby, Anthony, R South Indiana 

Park, Yoon, S Virginia 

Paulsmeyer, Jason, A. Missouri East 

Pearce, Charles Florida 

Peeples, William, D Louisiana 

Pike, Don, M. CentralTexas 

Reid, William, C. South Carolina 

Rhonemus, Alfi-ed, C West Ohio 

Rojas, Marivic, H Palawan Provisional 

Rose, Barbara, J Kansas West 

Roughton, Philip, H. Florida 

Salley, James South Carolina 

Scott III, William, D Mississippi 

Seamands, David Kentucky 

Seymour, James, T. Peninsula-Delaware 

Shivers, Constance, A. Southern New Jersey 

Sowers, Gary, D Central Pennsylvania 

Swanson, James, E. South Georgia 

Taylor, Mary Virginia Holston 

Tews, Jane, A Desert Southwest 

Tibbits, Lewis Detroit 

Trajkovski, Boris Macedonia-Yugoslavia Prov. 

Vetter, Jeremy Nebraska 

Villalon,Jr.,Aniceto,R. .... Southwest Philippines Prov. 

Weatherspoon, Dale California-Nevada 

Webb, Thomas, C. Central Pennsylvania 

White, Chris Western Pennsylvania 

Wier, Delight, B Central Illinois 

Williams, Wesley New England 

Wilson, Jr., Earl Western North Carolina 

Wright, Elizabeth, AS Virginia 

Wright, Richard, S. Alabama-West Florida 

Yoost, Timothy East Ohio 

Standing Legislative Committee (2) 
Room A 112 

Conferences 

Ada, Hans German Southwest 

Andres, Delfin, L East Mindanao Philippines Prov. 

Appleby, Charlie, L South Carolina 

Austin, Fred, L Holston 



Delegate Information 



73 



Avery, Donald, R. Louisiana 

Bean, Robbie Rocky Mountain 

Beck, Brian, E. Great Britain 

Benham,Beth,0 North Central New York 

Casey, Robert, T. Virginia 

Christian, Tom, L North Texas 

Ciampa, Donald, J. Central Pennsylvania 

Collins, Dorothy Florida 

Cook, Beth, L North Georgia 

Cook, Shirley Detroit 

Del Pino, Jerome, K. New England 

Dundas, Charlie, Minnesota 

Ewing, E. Keith Florida 

Extrum-Fernandez, Paul California-Nevada 

Fagan, Larry, R Missouri West 

Fisher, Tom Tennessee 

Fitch, Marion, West Ohio 

Fooshee, Dale, L Kansas East 

Foster, James, W. Texas 

Good, Menno, E. Eastern Pennsylvania 

Greene, Daryle, E Missouri East 

Griffith, Daniel East Ohio 

Hamrick, Leon North Alabama 

Han, James East Ohio 

Harrell, Sn.James, A. Western North Carolina 

Hausman, Sharon, A West Ohio 

Henry, William, R. Oklahoma 

Hill, L Douglas Virginia 

Hollins, McCallister North Georgia 

Hunter III, George, G Florida 

Huston, Joseph, D West Michigan 

Hutchison, Larry Southern Illinois 

Jarrett, Sue, C West Virginia 

Johnson, Peggy, Ann Baltimore-Washington 

Katemuna, Monga North Shaba 

Kincaid, Sr.,J. LaVon Western Pennsylvania 

Lewis, Patricia, A Western North Carolina 

Lindell, Rolf Sweden 

Ling, Stanley, T. West Ohio 

Lodi, Pungumbu Central Zaire 

Martin, Flo, S South Georgia 

McAlilly, Stephen, L Mississippi 

Moma, Moma, Wa Southern Zaire 

Morris, Jim, W. Red Bird Missionary 

Ngoy, Kazadi North Shaba 

Nicodemus, Richard New York 

Nolte, Beverly, M Iowa 

Nugent, Jr., Randolph, W. New York 

Oliveira, Costa Eastern Angola 

Ough, Bruce, R. Iowa 

Owen-Bofferding, Sue, J. Oregon-Idaho 

Park, Young Ok Northern Illinois 

Perry, James, M. Troy 

Poy, Emundu West Zaire 

Rainier, Helen, L Southern New Jersey 

Ravenhorst, Dorothy, A. Virginia 

Richardson, David, L. California-Pacific 

Rinehart, Joetta, F Western North Carolina 

Robertson, Suzi Texas 

Scheer, Dennis, H Kansas West 

Sharpe, Susan, M. Memphis 

Shaw, Jr., Caswell, E. North Carolina 

Shettle.John.T North Indiana 

Siaba, Judith, E Northern Illinois 

Stedman, Cathy, N Central Illinois 

Streiff, Patrick, Ph Switzerland-France 

SummerviUe, Margaret Baltimore-Washington 

Vanzant, Lucille, V Oklahoma 



Van Stone, Jack South Indiana 

Wende, Stephen, P. Southwest Texas 

Whiteside, Robert, E. Mississippi 

Wigel, Betty, L West Virginia 

Willimon, William, H. South Carolina 

Winston, Joseph, M Wisconsin" 

Wright, Betty Western New York 

Yannayon, Harold Western Pennsylvania 

Young, T. Michael Central Texas 

Zumo,Afonso Western Angola 

Standing Legislative Committee (3) 
Rooms A 108/110 

Discipleship 

Albright, John Jack', E. Texas 

Alford, Ben, R. Tennessee 

Alkuino, Aurora, S Visayas-North Mindanao Phlpns 

Amon, Darlene, V Virginia 

Anderson, Barry, H. North Alabama 

Andrews, Christopher, H Louisiana 

Archambeau, Trudy, M West Michigan 

Armstrong, Charles, R. South Indiana 

Arter, Dixie, A. North Indiana 

Auvenshine, William, R. Central Texas 

Bales, Harold, K. Western North Carolina 

Bank, Genie, S Western New York 

Barden, Kathleen, B North Central New York 

Bamett, Vemie, T. Central Illinois 

Bartel, Bruce, A Wisconsin 

Beisner, Judith Baltimore-Washington 

Blackwell, Roberta, E Western North Carolina 

Blair, B. Ann Holston 

Bowersox, Ronald, E. Central Pennsylvania 

Boyd, Candi Mississippi 

Brandt, Robert, B Northern New Jersey 

Brantley, Douglas "Mac' North Georgia 

Brockwell,Jr., Charles, W. Louisville 

Buskirk, James, B Oklahoma 

Byers, Shirley, D Troy 

Carlstrom, Berit Sweden 

Casad, Mary, Brooke North Texas 

Casady, Robert, L Missouri West 

Case, John, M. Mississippi 

Chamberlain, Ray, W. Virginia 

Cook,Jr., William, B Oregon-Idaho 

Daughtery, Vergil, L South Georgia 

Davis, Lindsey Kentucky 

Deel, William, S West Virginia 

Deocampo, Jeanne, G East Mindanao Phlpns Prov. 

Dodson, E. Malone North Georgia 

Eberhart, Penelope Dakotas 

Ervin,Jr., Paul, R North Georgia 

Etter, Martha, B Southwest Texas 

Euper, Jacqueline, K. Detroit 

Ferguson, Phyllis, S Pacific Northwest 

Fogle, Dolly South Carolina 

Frazier, Sr, Robert, C North Carolina 

Gagno, Rennaldo A. Mindanao Philippines 

Goodwin, Dick New Mexico 

Gordon, Jinny Central Illinois 

Granger, Philip, R. North Indiana 

Greenway, Jeffrey, E. Western Pennsylvania 

Gross, Richard, F New England 

Gruneke, Christel German North 

Hanke, Gilbert, C Texas 

Hartman, Shawn Central Pennsylvania 



74 



DCA Advance Edition 



Hasemeyer, Bill Nebraska 

Hassinger, Susan, W. Eastern Pennsylvania 

Henderson, Curtis, J Alabama- West Florida 

Henry, Daniel Northern Illinois 

Hilliard, David, M. Memphis 

Hinson, William, H. Texas 

Holtsclaw, nomas, G North Carolina 

Ingram, Betsy New York 

Jackson, Ward Virginia 

Jones, Brian, N South Indiana 

Jones, Chester, R. Little Rock 

Kimba, Kasongo North Shaba 

Krizova, Jana Czech and Slovak Republics 

Lane, James Qim), W North Arkansas 

Laycock, Evelyn Holston 

Macabuag, Rafael, M. Palawan Provisional 

Maj, Ryszard Poland 

Mason, Howard Peninsula-Delaware 

Massey, Mary Alice Florida 

Maun ey, Jimmy, H Western North Carolina 

McClellan, Jo Eva Kansas West 

McKeown, Leland, P Florida 

Moore, Frances, H North Alabama 

Morris, Patricia Western Pennsylvania 

Morrison, Susan New England 

Mumba, Djamba Central Zaire 

Myers, Mark, C. Southern Illinois 

Nawej, Sul, A Southern Zaire 

Park, Song Ja California-Pacific 

Petreski, Kitan Macedonia-Yugoslavia Prov. 

Phillips, J. Taylor South Georgia 

Powell, Sr., Larry, P Desert Southwest 

Ricks, Christian, T Missouri East 

Ridenour, Don Iowa 

Sadler, Herb Alabama-West Florida 

Sarazin, Duane, V. Minnesota 

Scott, Gail, F Wyoming" 

Sewell, Peggy, I Rocky Mountain 

Slaughter, Michael, B. West Ohio 

Smith, Randy Texas 

Still, Billy Alaska Missionary 

Stilwell, Robert, E. South Carolina 

Stover, Gregory, D West Ohio 

Stultz, Valerie, W. East Ohio 

Thielking, William, B Southern New Jersey 

Titus, Phylemon, D Detroit 

Trotter, Mark, C. California-Pacific 

Walker, Jr., Robert, C West Ohio 

Ward, Martha, D Iowa 

Washington, Stanley East Ohio 

Waters, Dale, C. West Virginia 

Whittle, Charles, D Northwest Texas 

Wiberg, Linda California-Nevada 

Wilcock, Deborah, M Eastern Pennsylvania 

Williams, Aileen, L Minnesota 

Wills, Jr, Richard,;. Florida 

Wogaman,}. Philip Baltimore-Washington 

Young, Carl, W Oklahoma 

Standing Legislative Committee (4) 
Rooms A 101/103 

Financial Administration 

Aubuchon, David, R East Ohio 

Beckley, David, L Mississippi 

Boiler, Thomas, R. Yellowstone" 

Bowers, Phyllis, M Central Pennsylvania 



Bowles, Paul, D Oklahoma 

Branscome, James, L Virginia 

Braswell, Kermit, L North Carolina 

Brubaker, Ellen, A West Michigan 

Carpenter, Jr., Robert, B Virginia 

Carrington,John,E. New York 

Carruth, Nancy Louisiana 

Chaplin, Jr., Hammie, L South Carolina 

Cleveland, J. Fay Western New York 

Cloud, Kay Peninsula-Delaware 

Corderman, Delos, D South Carolina 

Courtoy, Charles, W. Florida 

Grain, Dight, W New England 

Crickard, Elsie Kansas West 

Crutchfield, Charles New Mexico 

Davies, Susan, P. Nebraska 

Deer, Alvin, B. Oklahoma Indian Missionary 

Deriso, Jr., Walter, M South Georgia 

Eberhart, Diane, W Iowa 

Eurey, Charles, W Western North Carolina 

Evans, Jr., Cashar.W North Carolina 

Farrell, Leighton, K North Texas 

Ford, Lenora Thompson Eastern Pennsylvania 

Frazer, E. Eugene West Ohio 

Fredsby, Bent Denmark 

Furman, Jr., Frank, H Florida 

Grieb, Thomas, B LouisvUle 

Groseclose, Alan, D Holston 

Haverstock, Zedna, M Central Pennsylvania 

Hillman, Byrd Mississippi 

Hoffman, Elizabeth Southern New Jersey 

Hopkins, John, L South Indiana 

House, Donald, R. Texas 

Huffman, Joel, E Desert Southwest 

Johnson, Duane, R. California-Pacific 

Jones, Dale Kentucky 

Katokane, Mande North Shaba 

Kayinda, Mujinga Southern Zaire 

Kichibi, Mukalayi Tanganyika 

Knowles, Grady California-Nevada 

Kohlhepp, Glenn, B. Western Pennsylvania 

Leatherman, Sharon Baltimore-Washington 

Lippse, Charles, E. Holston 

Loy, 0. F Louisiana 

Loyd, Marilynn, N Little Rock 

Lutz, Benis West Ohio 

Marques, Regina Western Angola 

Matthis, Morris, F. Texas 

McCabe, John, S Northern Illinois 

Merrick, Tracy Western Pennsylvania 

Messer, Donald, E. Rocky Mountain 

Meyer, Mary Ellen Missouri East 

Miller, Mary, H South Indiana 

Miller, Sarah, S. Wyoming 

Moore, James, W. Texas 

Munda, Ukunda Northeast Zaire 

Ngeleka, Mpanga North Shaba 

Nutter, Randy, P West Virginia 

Ombaku, Onema Central Zaire 

Ortiz Vidal, Victor Puerto Rico 

Ot^es, Jim, H North Indiana 

Palaganas, Leon, L Central Luzon 

Peckham, Galen, E. Iowa 

Pennell, James, T. South Georgia 

Percell, Emery, A Northern Illinois 

Perry, Rubin North Georgia 

Pickett, William, A Florida 

Potter, Helen, E West Ohio 



Delegate Information 



75 



Quick, Jeff North Arkansas 

Robinson, Randall, F. Central Illinois 

Rodriguez, Phyllis, R Wisconsin 

Salyer, Ronald North Central New York 

Sheaffer, Lee, B. Virginia 

Sitts,Jeff Minnesota 

Skinner, James, G East Ohio 

Smith, Jerry, J. Southwest Texas 

Stanton, Harold Detroit 

Stegall, Karl, K. Alabama-West Florida 

Stevens, Robert, W Pacific Northwest 

Stewart, MoUie, M North Alabama 

Swiggett, Ernest, L New York 

Thompson, James, N. North Georgia 

Trevino-Teddlie, Jeannie Central Texas 

Trotter, Jr., Frank, E. Baltimore-Washington 

Tubach, Jerry, A Kansas East 

Underwood, Donald, W. North Texas 

Ward, Gary, T. North Alabama 

Waymire, Mona Mae Oklahoma 

Weems.Jr., Lovett, H. Missouri West 

Werlein, Jr., Ewing Texas 

White, Jr., Charles (Denny), D. . . . Western North Carolina 

Whitlow, Mark Memphis 

Wilkinson, Larry, D Western North Carolina 

Williams, Joe Tennessee 

Ygar, Teresita, A Southwest Philippines Prov. 

Standing Legislative Committee (5) 
Rooms A 105/107 

General/Judicial Administration 

Anderson, James East Ohio 

Archer, Anita, K Memphis 

Amold,Jr.,W.E. (Buddy) North Arkansas 

Baker, Jr., Rudolph, R. Noith Georgia 

Bates, Jr., William, L Dakotas 

Bevins, C. Rex Nebraska 

Bickerton, Thomas, J. West Virginia 

Bishop, Nathaniel, L Virginia 

Bobo, Jr., Hiram North Georgia 

Bonner, Byrd, L Southwest Texas 

Carcano, Minerva, G Rio Grande 

Causby, Jimmy Western North Carolina 

Chen, Peter, F. California-Nevada 

Collier, Theodore, C. Missouri West 

Conklin, Brooke Troy 

Cooke, John, D Western New York 

Cotton-Winn, Carole Louisiana 

Day, Inday New York 

Deckard, Stephen, T. North Central New York 

DeMarcus, Jamima, P Western North Carolina 

Dillard,Jr.,F. Douglas Virginia 

Edwards, Alma, B Detroit 

Emswiler, Sharon Neufer Central Illinois 

Ernst, Sally Western Pennsylvania 

Fang, Marcus Wisconsin" 

Farris, Patricia, E. California-Pacific 

Ferguson, Sandra Baltimore-Washington 

Forbes, Janet Rocky Mountain 

Goldman, June P Iowa 

Goldschmidt, Victor, W North hidiana 

Goodgame, Gordon, C. Holston 

Greathouse, Lowell, R. Oregon-Idaho 

Hairston, William, I West Virginia 



Halloway, Eke, A Sierra Leone 

Harper, Polly, G South Carolina 

Hatcher, William 'Bill', S South Georgia 

Hayes, Jr., Robert, E. Texas 

Hearin, Gerry, M. North Alabama 

Hill, Ed, H Northwest Texas 

Holsinger, Jim Kentucky 

Howell, H. Sharon Kansas East 

Iceman, Anita, L Desert Southwest 

Johnson, Alfred Eastern Pennsylvania 

Johnson, Charles, L South Carolina 

Johnson, Thelma, L West Ohio 

Jones, Jon, W. Kansas West 

Kafimbo, Shimbi North Shaba 

Kapumba, Isolo Southern Zaire 

Keaton, Jonathan, D Northern Illinois 

King, Jr, James, R. Tennessee 

LaBarr,Joan, G North Texas 

LangfordUI, Thomas (Andy), A. . . Western North Carolina 

Lett, Steven, T West Michigan 

Mahle, Kathi Austin Minnesota 

Matthews, Marcus Baltimore-Washington 

Mays, Joe W. Mississippi 

Mays, Orville Southern Illinois 

McCray, Holly, S Oklahoma 

McCuUough, June D Southern New Jersey 

McMahan, Dorothy, S New England 

Middleton,Jane,A New York 

Miller, Maynard, L Minnesota" 

Miller, Patricia, L South Indiana" 

Moxley, Jody, P Florida 

Ngoy Kyungu, Matanga North Shaba 

Nibbelink, Jim West Ohio 

Nicholson, Anne, D Eastern Pennsylvania 

Odimba, Kalema Central Zaire 

Olson, Harrett, Jane Northern New Jersey 

Outlaw, Frederick, G Alabama-West Florida 

Pacey, Stephen, R Central Illinois 

Page,Jr., Conrad, M Central Pennsylvania 

Palmer, Gregory, V. East Ohio 

Panganiban, Rustico, V. East Philippines 

Rainwater, Dorothy Mississippi 

Sager, Stan New Mexico 

Saunkeah, Ann Oklahoma Indian Missionary 

Schenck, Carl, L. Missouri East 

Self, Eddie North Alabama 

Severe, David, L Oklahoma 

Short, Riley, P. Florida 

Smith, Theodore Virginia 

Smith, Tompsie, K. Iowa 

Sprague, C. Joseph West Ohio 

St. Clair, Liz Peninsula-Delaware 

Stanovsky, Elaine, J. W. Pacific Northwest 

Strickland, Don Texas 

Trumble, Bette, T. Nebraska 

Weaver, Peter, D Western Pennsylvania 

Wegelius, Fredrik Finland-Swedish Provisional 

Wendland, Barbara Central Texas 

White, Paul, D Louisiana 

Whittemore, Joe, M North Georgia 

Wilson, David, B Little Rock 

Witwer, Brian North Indiana 

Workman, Anna, G North Carolina 

Wynn, Samuel North Carolina 



76 



DCA Advance Edition 



Standing Legislative Committee (6) 
Room A 201 

Global Ministries 

Akers, Mary, E Northern Illinois 

Alford, Joyce, L Wisconsin 

Alvord, Alec, M. Western North Carolina 

Bales, linda West Ohio 

Barnes, William, S. Florida 

Batiste, Jr., Harold, E Southwest Texas 

Benson, Judy, J Oklahoma 

Biggins, Moira Great Britain 

Blacklock, Gloria, J Southern Illinois 

Bretsch, Ronald North Central New York 

Chase, Dottie East Ohio 

Clem, Kelly, A North Alabama 

Cofer, Jr., Charles, H South Georgia 

Colby, Rhonda, V. Virginia 

Coleman, Robert, P. South Indiana 

Cottrill, Donald, C. Louisiana 

Crawford, Sr., Joseph, L North Georgia 

Csemak, Eva Hungary Provisional 

Csemak, Istvan Hungary Provisional 

Darst, Betty West Ohio 

Daughenbaugh, Jr., Howard, L Central Illinois 

Dirdak, Paul, R. California-Nevada 

Dorsey, Frank, L Kansas East 

Earl, Dorothy, M Wyoming" 

Edwards, Marion, M. South Georgia 

Ekoko, Onema Central Zaire 

Feimer, Elizabeth, A. Missouri West 

Fowlkes, Nancy New York 

Fuller, Cynthia, R. Central Pennsylvania 

Garibay, Limerio, C. East Philippines 

Gibson, Mildred, W Western North Carolina 

Gomes, Antonia, Z. Western Angola 

Gray, Eileen Western Pennsylvania 

Gwinn.Al Kentucky 

Hamilton, Hattie, G Eastern Pennsylvania 

Henderson, Ronald, D. North Texas 

Hill, Judith, C Central Pennsylvania 

Hines, William, A West Ohio 

Jayne, Carlos, C. Iowa 

Johnson, Carolyn, E North Indiana 

Johnson, Jane, H North Carolina 

Keels, Bernard 'Skip' Baltimore-Washington 

Keels, Christine Baltimore-Washington 

Kester, Susan, K Peninsula-Delaware 

Kober, Friedhelm German East 

Ulleoja, Tarmo Estonia Provisional 

Lucena, Harvey, M. Bicol Philippines Provisional 

Lyght, Ernest, S Norfliem New Jersey 

Marchbanks, Paul, Y. Holston 

Mason, Betty Sue Florida 

McCallum, Marvin, H. Detroit 

McCauley, Ronald, M. West Virginia 

McKonly, Melinda, L Eastern Pennsylvania 

McReynolds, Russell, F. West Michigan 

Means, Barbara, L Texas 

Mendenhall, Don, W Iowa 

Mims, L. F. (Harry) Western North Carolina 

Moncure, Jr., Rhymes, H. Missouri East 

Morrison, Martha (Twick) Mississippi 

Nkemba, Ndjungu Southern Z^e 

Nkulu Ntanda, Ntambo North Shaba 

Nutter, Judy, A. West Virginia 

Ocampo, Generoso, C Bulacan Philippines 



Outslay, Marilyn, J Oregon-Idaho 

Parker, Joe New England 

Parker, Richard, S New York 

Paul, Doris, B North Georgia 

Peel, Dorothy Memphis 

Phillips, Cheryl Central Texas 

Phillips, J D CentralTexas 

Pierson, Robert, D Oklahoma 

Pineda, Al California-Pacific 

Poto, Umembudi Central Zaire 

Puslecki, Edward Poland 

Readdean, Shirley, E Troy 

Reasner, William, S. Southern New Jersey 

Redding, LaVada, S Rocky Mountain 

Rhodes, Arnold, A Western Pennsylvania 

Rice, Mattie, M Little Rock 

Roberts, Rodell, F Florida 

Rogers, Sheila, D South Carolina 

Rollins, Benita East Ohio 

Rosquita, Faustino Visayas-North Mindanao Phlpns 

Schwab, Penney Kansas West 

Shamana, Beverly, J. California-Pacific 

Sharp, Christie, C Desert Southwest 

Shingler, Sara, S South Carolina 

Shuler, Albert North Carolina 

Siegrist, Roland Austria Provisional 

Silva, Mary Rio Grande 

Smalley, Susan Alaska Missionary 

Smith, Jim, W. Northwest Texas 

Soderstrom, Marcus Finland-Swedish Provisional 

Sowards, Charlotte, M Louisville 

Spencer, Beverly, J Iowa 

Story, Bettie, W Central Illinois 

Sublette, Jean, S Alabama-West Florida 

Suzuki, Betty California-Nevada 

Sweet, Elizabeth, A. New England 

Thompson, Marjorie, H Minnesota 

Thompson, OdeU Wisconsin 

Tucker, Mary Frances Holston 

Turner, Richard, D Nebraska 

Undo, Yemba Northeast Z^e 

Velez, Miguel, A Puerto Rico 

Watt, Sharon, M. Texas 

Weaver, Michael Virginia 

Wembudinga, Gilbert, U Upper Zaire 

White, David, L South Indiana 

Whitehurst, Betty, C Virginia 

Whitfield, D. Max North Arkansas 

WiUiams, Margaret, A. Northern Illinois 

Wright, Juanita, B. Teimessee 

Yeoh.Jenni, M Pacific Northwest 

Yohan, Shantilata, R. F North Georgia 

Youngblood, Rebecca, C. Mississippi 

Standing Legislative Committee (7) 
Room A 205 

Higher Education and Chaplaincy 

Alexander, Betty, M Tennessee 

Anderson, Gail, Wyoming" 

Ashmos, Donde Plowman Southwest Texas 

Bamsey, Alfi-ed, T. Detroit 

Berte, Neal, R North Alabama 

Biggs, Jr., Marvin Mouzon Oklahoma 

Black, Charlene, R. South Georgia 

Bray, Jr., Jerry, G Virginia 

Brewer, Jackson Kentucky 



Delegate Information 



77 



Briscoe, I. Carolyn South Carolina 

Brown, Jr., Warner, H. California-Nevada 

Brown, Michael, B Western North Carolina 

Calvert, Jr., Robert, A. North Georgia 

Carruth, Amanda Memphis 

Carson, Kit Florida 

Carver, Rebecca, C. Iowa 

Cervenak, Josef Czech and Slovak Republics 

Chalker, Kenneth, W. East Ohio 

Chamness, Ben, R Texas 

Conoway, Merlin, D Mississippi 

Davis, Elwood, G Southern New Jersey 

Deming,Joan, C. Wisconsin 

Dfacon, J. D Louisville 

Djundu, Lunge Central Zaire 

Dove, Carolyn Louisiana 

Dowdy, Kristen, E Virginia 

Erwin, Max, G Western North Carolina 

Forrest, Martha, H. North Georgia 

Foster, Nancy, K. Oklahoma 

Gray, Stefanie, A. California-Pacific 

Green, Mareyjoyce East Ohio 

Gulinello, Frank New England 

Halderman, Sharon, D Central Pennsylvania 

Hardcastle, James Peninsula-Delaware 

Holifield, J. Anthony North Arkansas 

Holmes, William, A Baltimore-Washington 

Hopkins, Carolyn, J South Georgia 

Johnson, Dan Florida 

Kavwala Matanda, Ngoy Tanganyika 

Kelso, Scott, T. West Ohio 

Ladd, Keith, M Eastern Pennsylvania 

Livingston, David, S Kansas East 

Logan, James, C. Virginia 

Lucas, Aubrey, K. Mississippi 

Mathison.JohnEd Alabama-West Florida 

McCoy, Myron, F. Northern Illinois 

McGarvey, Gregory South Indiana 

Minor, Ute German North 

Montgomery, Samuel Texas 

Munyangwe, Kabamba North Shaba 

Munza, Kasongo North Shaba 

Newman, Jared, A. Rocky Mountain 

Norris, J. Allen North Carolina 

Pamamets, Olav Estonia Provisional 

Plowman, jack, W Western Pennsylvania 

Potter-Miller, Jaime Western Pennsylvania 

Rajamaa, Tapani, J. Finland-Finnish Provisional 

Reed, James, R Kansas West 

Richards, Alys, P North Texas 

Rivera, Eli, S. New York 

Ross, Ernest Baltimore-Washington 

Segrest, Dale Alabama-West Florida 

Sendwe, Eunga West Zaire 

Sessions, Jeff, B Alabama-West Florida 

Sessums, T. Terrell Florida 

Sikes, Scott Holston 

Simmons, Angelin, J. South Carolina 

Spachman, Amy, L West Michigan 

Stephenson, Janet, E Iowa 

Stroman, Pat CentralTexas 

Sykes, Roslyn, K. Missouri East 

Umembudi, Akasa Central Zaire 

Urbom, Warren Nebraska 

Wagner, Ray Dakotas 

Watkins, Bradley, F. Central Illinois 

West, Brenda, G Missouri West 

Williams, Jr.. Jacob, C. North Indiana 



Wilson, J. LaVon Central Illinois 

Wilson, L. Cean West Ohio 

Wolfe, Thomas, V. North Central New York 

Wright, Richard, L West Virginia 

Standing Legislative Committee (8) 
Room A 209 

Independent Commissions 

Abrams, Geraldine West Ohio 

Admussen, Betty, J Missouri West 

Agnew, Theodore, L Oklahoma 

Alexander, Anthony Central Pennsylvania 

Amerson, Philip, A South Indiana 

Ames III, Guy, C. Oklahoma 

Barr, Robin, E Pacific Northwest 

Bass, Ressie Mae Florida 

Brazelton, David, L Florida 

Brown, Kimi Tennessee 

Brown, Ruth, S Alabama-West Florida 

Bryant, Norma, L Texas 

Bulaya, Shimba North Shaba 

Butler, Phyllis Baltimore-Washington 

Byrd, Julian, L Texas 

Cain, Alfred, E Northern Illinois 

Case, Riley North Indiana 

Craft, Precious, B California-Nevada 

Grain, Judy Wisconsin" 

Cromwell, Alice East Ohio 

Douglas, Jr., WiUard.H Virginia 

Drachler, Stephen, E Central Pennsylvania 

Edgerly, Cynthia New England 

England, Stan, B North Georgia 

Farmer, Penny Dollar North Carolina 

Fields, Lynette Florida 

Garrett, Joel, S Western Pennsylvania 

Grey, Thelma Western Pennsylvania 

Haase, Becky California-Pacific 

Hagiya, Grant, J. California-Pacific 

Heare, Jerry Southwest Texas 

Henderson, Cornelius, L North Georgia 

Henderson, Dolores, H. New York 

Henderson, Gwen, C North Carolina 

Horton,Alvin,J. Virginia 

Hulick, Elizabeth 'Betsy* Virginia 

James, Rachel, S Louisville 

Jones, Cynthia, A Central Illinois 

Kang, Youngsook, C. Rocky Mountain 

Kiebling, Dieter German East 

Kiesey, Deborah, L Iowa 

Kitterman, Sarah Iowa 

Lee, Charles, H. North Alabama 

Mallory, Margaret, M. West Ohio 

Mbukula, Koy Central Zaire 

O'Connor-Slater, Deborah, L. . . . North Central New York 

Olive, George, E Northern New Jersey 

Pace, Kimberly, R Mississippi 

Quick, William, K. Detroit 

Quilling, Debra, A. S. South Carolina 

Radde, Henry, W. Central Texas 

Rajamaa, Iris, Ch Finland-Finnish Provisional 

Rankin, Nancy, Burgin Western North Carolina 

Ruff, Jerry, D Southern New Jersey 

Rush, James, H South Georgia 

Scott, Zane Holston 

Severance, Robert, J Kansas West 

Shepherd, Jim Kentucky 



78 



DCA Advance Edition 



Skelley-WattsJoan.E. East Ohio 

Smith, Carol, A. Missouri East 

Stewart, Carl, E Louisiana 

Stewart, Jr., Donald, S Baltimore-Washington 

Toschak, Patricia Morton Minnesota 

Vun Cannon, L Leuds Western North Carolina 

Watson, Tom Nebraska 

Waugh, James, E. West Ohio 

Wheatley, Dossie, F. Memphis 

Williams, Donald West Michigan 

Williams, Raymond North Texas 

Yebuah, Lisa South Carolina 

Young, Jack Western North Carolina 

Yrigoyen, Charles Eastern Pennsylvania 

Zombil, Mwez Southern Zaire 

Standing Legislative Committee (9) 
Room A 207 

Local Church 

Abram, Charlotte Nebraska 

Aldridge, Jr., Julian, M. Western North Carolina 

Balentine, Becky North Carolina 

Becker, Gene, R West Michigan 

Beppler, Ron Southern New Jersey 

Caldwell, Kirhyjon Texas 

Chatham, Betty, J Mississippi 

Christy, Jr., John, H. Western North Carolina 

Clapp, Sylvia, L Western North Carolina 

Clark, Jr, Russell, M. West Ohio 

Clark, Terry, L. Central Illinois 

Crawford, Avon Iowa 

Cronin, Deborah, K. Western New York 

Crump, Anita Louisiana 

Dowdy, Roger, C Virginia 

Dowell,Jean Minnesota 

DuVall, George Baltimore-Washington 

Elkins, Lyman, E West Virginia 

Ellisor,J. Walter Alabama-West Florida 

Foley, Emma DeU California-Pacific 

Foockle, Harry, F. Missouri West 

Francis, Lufunda Southern Zaire 

Galloway, Mary Ann West Ohio 

Gentry, James, E. South Indiana 

Gerhard, June A. West Ohio 

Gibson, TTiomas, D Eastern Pennsylvania 

Gordon, Tyrone, T Kansas West 

Goudie, Robert, F. Detroit 

Gray, Aaron, M. Rocky Mountain 

Green, H. Sterling Peninsula-Delaware 

Hamish,James,A Florida 

Hataway, Joan Texas 

Hodges, Larry, T Oklahoma 

Horton,John, E. South Georgia 

Howard, J. N. Holston 

Huber-Hohls, Ruth Central Texas 

Huie, Janice Riggle, K Southwest Texas 

Isnes, Anders Norway 

Jackson, Kenneth, J. Virginia 

Jennings, Irwin, E. East Ohio 

Jennings, James, F. Florida 

Johnson, H., Sam South Carolina 

Jones, Richard, H. Wisconsin" 

Jones, Scott, J. North Texas 

Kail, Edward, A Iowa 

Kerscher, Horst German Southwest 

Kilpatrick, Joe, W North Georgia 



Kim, Myung, J. Virginia 

Kirk,R.,L. Northwest Texas 

Knight, Gary, H. Mississippi 

Konge, Makese North Shaba 

Kumbe.Alua Central Zaire 

Lacaulan, Josue, M. Central Luzon 

Lee, Kum New England 

Litalema, Bogenda Upper Zaire 

Maxwell, Cecil East Ohio 

Mendonca, Benvinda Eastern Angola 

Mitchell, Beth, W. Northern New Jersey 

Moyer, Bonda, D. North Arkansas 

Neese, Betty North Central New York 

Nelson, Betty, J Kansas East 

Oliver, Mary Brown Baltimore-Washington 

Parks, Lewis, A Central Pennsylvania 

Parris, Shirley New York 

Pasley, B.,J South Carolina 

Pennel,Jr.,Joe,E. Tennessee 

Peters, Rhoda, A. Louisville 

Potts, Bertha, M. Oklahoma 

Presnell, William, M. North Carolina 

Price, Pearl, L Red Bird Missionary 

Quibonda, Francisco Western Angola 

Reese, William, D Missouri East 

Renshaw, Earl, R. Southern Illinois 

Reynolds, Cynthia North Indiana 

Rosas, Robert, R. Pacific Northwest 

Samuel, Kayombo Southern Zaire 

Sheets, Herchel, S North Georgia 

Skeen, W.M. 'Bill' Holston 

Stabler, Monty North Alabama 

Stephenson, Roy Memphis 

Swisher, Ronald, E. California-Nevada 

TTiomas, John, J South Indiana 

Tinoco,David,A California-Pacific 

Turner-Lacy, Nathaniel, L West Virginia 

Twigg, Aimee, W. Western Pennsylvania 

Walker, Dorothy Western Pennsylvania 

Wata, Kongolo North Shaba 

West,Jr,J. Pete North Alabama 

Williams, Tullalah, F. Northern Illinois 

Womeldorff, Porter, J Central Illinois 

Zimmerman, Emily Ann Florida 

Standing Legislative Committee (10) 
Rooms A 104/106 

Ordained and Diaconal Ministiy 

Adair, Sharon, W North Texas 

Adams, Freda, L New York 

Adams, L Cecile Detroit 

Arant, James, S South Carolina 

Arnold, Kathy, S Minnesota 

Atha, Grayson West Ohio 

Aying, Muland, K. Southern Zaire 

Bagwell, Timothy, J. South Georgia 

Bailey, Paul, C. Virginia 

Baker, Jonathan, E. Peninsula-Delaware 

Baker, Sandra, W Virginia 

Bamett, Jeanne California-Nevada 

Barrett, Joy, A Detroit 

Barto, Suella, C Central Pennsylvania 

Besserer, Armin German South 

Beveridge, RaeLynn, Schlief West Ohio 

Blankenship, Paul, F. Memphis 

Bledsoe, W. Earl Texas 



Delegate Information 



79 



Bortell, James, B Central Illinois 

Bowdan, Mel Kentucky 

Bowles, Jr., Albert,/. Holston 

Bradley, Carol Ann West Ohio 

Burkhart,J., Robert Iowa 

Campbell Hyde, Catherine Great Britain 

Clark, Dorothy, Davis Baltimore-Washington 

Connolly, Phillip, F West Ohio 

Crouch, William, C. North Texas 

Daugherty, Ruth, A. Eastern Pennsylvania 

Day, Barbara North Georgia 

Duel, Nancy, D Northern Illinois 

Dunlap, Catherine East Ohio 

Dunlap, Nancye, K. Missouri East 

Eblen, Thomas, W. Lx)uisville 

Ehlers, Don, C Missouri West 

Extrum-Femandez, Renae, D California-Nevada 

Fenn, Philip, J Oklahoma 

Fisher, Violet, L Eastern Pennsylvania 

Foster, S. Stephen Wisconsin 

Frederick, Jr, Austin Southwest Texas 

Garcia, Barbara, P Tennessee 

Gardner, Andrew, J. Kansas East 

Goodpastor, Larry, M. Mississippi 

Goodwin, Galen, L Northern New Jersey 

Griffith, Jr., Frank, J. South Carolina 

Hallett, Helga, P. West Virginia 

Hamilton, Tom, W Florida 

Hathcock, Philip, L North Arkansas 

Helliesen, Oyvind Norway 

Henderson, Jean Holston 

Hershberger, Nyle Western Pennsylvania 

Huckaby, Jr., Robert, L. North Carolina 

Hutchins, Charles, A. South Carolina 

Hutchinson, William New Mexico 

Joyner,Jr,F. Belton North Carolina 

Justice, Jean Fitch Minnesota 

Kammerer, Chartene, P. Florida 

Keck, Duane,J Alabama-West Florida 

Knight, Suzanne, P West Virginia 

Kumn, Duk, Kyu Northern Illinois 

Lefelar, Donald, E. East Ohio 

Lehman, Katharine North Indiana 

Lemmel, Barbara Troy 

Lutz, Sandra, W East Ohio 

Marshall, Carolyn, M South Indiana 



Matthews, Eugene, W. Baltimore-Washington 

McCleary, Renee, L Southern New Jersey 

McClendon, William, T. South Carolina 

McCleskey, J. Lawrence Western North Carolina 

McKinney,J.,Eric Central Texas 

Meeks, Donald, L Southern Illinois 

Meyer, Margaret, E Iowa 

Miller, Clayton, Z. New York 

Miller, John, D Western Pennsylvania 

Moe, Sharon, L Pacific Northwest 

Moore, Joy, J. West Michigan 

Moore, Mary Elizabeth California-Pacific 

Morgan, Sharie North Indiana 

Morris, Carolyn, W. North Georgia 

Mukala, Musenge North Shaba 

Mukenge,Liwa Central Zaire 

Nausner, Helmut Austria Provisional 

O'Dell, Paulette, W. Little Rock 

Oden,Tal Oklahoma 

Palmer, Ruth, G Texas 

Paup, Edward, W. Rocky Mountain 

Pitney, Deborah, G Oregon-Idaho 

Pritts, Deborah, L North Central New York 

Queen, Dolores, B Western North Carolina 

Rathod, Samuel, R Nebraska 

Reeves, Sr., Richard, E Central Illinois 

Rhodes-Wickett, Sharon, K. California-Pacific 

Richardson, Gerald Western New York 

Riddle, Barbara, W. Florida 

Ruach, Susan, W.N. South Indiana 

Schock, Louise, K. Northwest Texas 

Simmons, Charles, B. Louisiana 

Smith, Hiram Central Texas 

Standiford, James, W. Desert Southwest 

Stout, David, B Iowa 

Tan, Wee-Li New England 

Topolewski, John, L Wyoming" 

Tyler, Ann Western North Carolina 

Vogt, Jerold, W. Kansas West 

Watson, B. Michael Alabama-West Florida 

Wilder, Gamett, M. North Georgia 

Woods, Vicki New England 

Woolridge, Jr., Eugene, R. Virginia 

Yoost, Charles, D East Ohio 

York, Billy, L North Alabama 

Zeiders, G. Edwin Central Pennsylvania 



80 



DCA Advance Edition 



Nominations to the Interjurisdictional Committee 

on Episcopacy 



North Central Jurisdiction 

Central Illinois 
Dakotas 
Detroit 
East Ohio 
Iowa 

Minnesota 
North Indiana 
Northern Illinois 
South Indiana 
Southern Illinois 
West Michigan 
Wisconsin 

Northeastern Jurisdiction 

Baltimore-Washington 

Central Pennsylvania 

Eastern Pennsylvania 

New England 

New York 

North Central New York 

Peninsula-Delaware 

Southern New Jersey 

Troy 

West Virginia 

Western New York 

Western Pennsylvania 

Wyoming 

South Central Jurisdiction 

Central Texas 
Kansas East 
Kansas West 
Little Rock 
Louisiana 
Missouri East 
Missouri West 



Howard L. Daughenbaugh Jr. 
Penelope Eberhart 
Joy A. Barrett 
James G. Skinner 
Bruce R. Ough 
Duane V. Sarazin 
Michael J. Coyner 
Gregroy R. Dell 
Susan W.N. Ruach 
Mark C. Myers 
James W. Boehm 
Joyce L. Alford 



Bernard 'Skip' Keels 
Ronald E. Bowersox 
Claude A. Edmonds 
Jerome K. Del Pino 
Jane A. Middleton 
Sudarshana Devadhar 
Lawrence M. Livingston 
William S. Reasner 
James M. Perry 
Richard L. Wright 
J. Fay Cleveland 
Aimee W. Twigg 
Sarah S. Miller 



Don M. Pike 
Frank L. Dorsey 
Tyrone T. Gordon 
David B. Wilson 
Charles B. Simmons 
Rhymes H. Moncurejr. 
Theodore C. Collier 



J. LaVon Wilson 
Ray Wagner 
Shirley Cook 
Sandra W. Lutz 
Janet E. Stephenson 
Aileen L. Williams 
Dixie A. Arter 
Mary E. Akers 
John J. Thomas 
Orville Mays 
Gene R. Becker 
Phyllis R. Rodriguez 



Sandra Ferguson 
Gary D. Sowers 
Anne D. Nicholson 
Richard F. Gross 
Ernest L. Swiggett 
Elizabeth J. Burlew 
Howard Mason 
D. McCullough 
Brooke Conklin 
William S. Deel 
Genie S. Bank 
Sally Ernst 
Gail 0. Anderson 



William R. Auvenshine 
Dale L Fooshee 
Penney Schwab 
Marilynn N. Loyd 
Anita Crump 
Daryle E. Greene 
Jon R. Gray 



DCA Advance Edition 



81 



Nebraska 

New Mexico 

North Arkansas 

North Texas 

Northwest Texas 

Oklahoma 

Oklahoma Indian Missionary 

Rio Grande 

Southwest Texas 

Texas 

Soutfaeastem Jurisdiction 

Alabama-West Florida 

Florida 

Holston 

Kentucky 

Louisville 

Memphis 

Mississippi 

North Alabama 

North Carolina 

North Georgia 

Red Bird Missionary 

South Carolina 

South Georgia 

Tennessee 

Virginia 

Western North Carolina 

Western Jurisdiction 

Alaska Missionary 
California-Nevada 
Desert Southwest 
Oregon-Idaho 
Pacific Northwest 
Rocky Mountain 
Yellowstone 



C. Rex Bevins 
William Hutchinson 

D. Max Whitfield 
Joan G. LaBarr 
Jim W. Smith 
Philip J. Fenn 
Alvin B. Deer 
Minerva G. Carcano 
Janice Riggle K. Huie 
James W. Moore 



KarlK. Stegall 
Richard J Wills Jr. 
Charles E. Lippse 
Lindsey Davis 
Thomas W. Eblen 
David M. Hilliard 
Joe W. Mays 
Billy L York 
Kermit L. Braswell 
E. Malone Dodson 
Jim W. Morris 
Sheila D. Rogers 
Timothy J. Bagwell 
James R. King Jr. 
Ray W. Chamberlain 
J. Lawrence McCleskey 



Billy Still 
Paul R. Dirdak 
Anita L. Iceman 
Deborah G. Pitney 
Elaine J. W. Stanovsky 
Edward W. Paup 
Thomas R. Boiler 



Bette T. Trumble 
Stan Sager 
James 0im) W. Lane 
Tom L. Christian 
Ed H. Hill 
Tal Oden 
Ann Saunkeah 
Mary Silva 
Byrd L Bonner 
Barbara L Means 



Dale Segrest 
Mary Alice Massey 
Jean Henderson 
Dale Jones 
Charlotte M. Sowards 
Anita K. Archer 
Martha (Twick) Morrison 
Frances H. Moore 
Cashar W. Evans Jr. 
Paul R. Ervin Jr. 
Pearl L Price 
I. Carolyn Briscoe 
William 'Bill' S. Hatcher 
Betty M. Alexander 
Darlene V. Amon 
Joetta F. Rinehart 



Susan Smalley 

Paul Extrum-Fernandez 

Joel E. Huffman 

Donna H. Boe 

Phyllis S. Ferguson 

Peggy 1. Sewell 

Lin Doyle 



82 



DCA Avance Edition 



Legislative Process 



Petitions are sent by agencies, conferences, 
churches, and individuals. 



The petitions secretary assigns petition numbers. 

The numbers indicate the legislative committee, the 

chronological order, and the source 



Petitions from agencies and conferences are printed 

in Advance Edition I of the DCA; all others are 

printed in Advance Edition H. 



Reference committee reviews assignments by 

petitions secretary. They combine petitions and 

make new assignments to legislative committees as 

deemed necessary. 



Legislative committees act upon petitions and make 
recommendations to plenary session. 



T 



Reports are sent to DCA. Copy is returned to 

committee officers for approval. Copy is sent to the 

General Conference secretary for a calendar 

number prior to being printed in the DCA. 




The action is printed in the Discipline or the Book 

of Resolutions. The DCA becomes the official 

journal of the General Conference. 



Delegate Information 83 



Abbreviations and Codes 

In this Advance Edition of the Daily Christian Advocate are printed reports, proposed changes in the Discipline, 
and proposed resolutions from annual conferences and general agencies. Petitions from local churches, 
individuals, and others will be printed in Advance Edition II, which will be on delegates' desks on the opening day 
of conference. These are not the full petitions; editing has been done to conserve space and to maintain 
consistency of style. 

During General Conference, complete petitions will be in the hands of the Committee on Reference and the 
legislative committees to which they are assigned. Any delegate desiring to see a complete petition may obtain a 
copy from the petitions secretary. 

Proposed deletions to existing legislation are indicated by strike through . Proposed additions to existing 
legislation are indicated by bold face. Clergy names in the delegate listings are in italics. Each petition is 
numbered using the following code: 

Petition Coding 

First series of numbers Chronological listing of petition ( begins with 20,001) 

First two letters Legislative committee 

Second series of numbers Paragraph in Discipline 

NonDis Non-Disciplinary matter 

Single letter: 

C Constitutional amendment 

D Discipline other than constitution 

U Update to Book of Resolutions 

R Referral on calendar item 

Other 

$ Financial implications (existing budget) 

! Financial implications (new budget) 

Legislative Committees General Agencies 

GBCS General Board of Church and Society 

CC Cenfral Conferences qBqD General Board of Discipleship 



CO Conferences 



GBGM General Board of Global Ministries 



^ Church and Society GBHEM General Board of Higher Education and 

DI Discipleship Ministry 

FA Financial Administration GBPHB General Board of Pension/Health 

GJ General Administration/Judicial Benefits 

Administration GBOP General Board of Publication 

GM Global Ministries GCAH General Commission on Archives and 

HE Higher Education and Chaplaincy History 

IC hidependent Commissions GCCUIC General Commission on Christian 

LC Local Church Unity/Interreligious Concerns 

MN Ordained and Diaconal Ministry GCOC General Commission on Communications 

GCFA General Council on Finance and 

Administration 

GCOM General Council on Ministries 

BPSC Baptism Study Committee GCRR General Commission on Religion and 

RBGM Task Force to Study Relocating Race 

General Board of Global Ministries GCSRW General Commission on the Status and 

MS Ministry Study Role of Women 



Study Groups 



84 



DCA Advance Edition 



Abbreviations for the Annual Conferences of The United Methodist Church 



AFL Alabama-West Florida 

BMW Baltimore-Washington 

BUL Bulgaria Provisional 

CAP California-Pacific 

CLZ Central Luzon 

CZA Central Zaire 

DEN Denmark 

EMP East Mindanao Philippines Prov. 

EAN Eastern Angola 

FIF Finland-Finnish Provisional 

GRE German East 

GSW German Southwest 

HNG Hungary Provisional 

KSW Kansas West 

LRK Little Rock 

MEM Memphis 

MDO Mindanao 

MOE Missouri East 

NEB Nebraska 

NYK New York 

NAK North Arkansas 

NCP North Central Philippines 

NSH North Shaba 

NZA Northeast Zaire 

NPH Northern Philippines 

NOR Norway 

ORI Oregon-Idaho 

FED Peninsula-Delaware 

PRC Puerto Rico 

RKM Rocky Mountain 

SGA South Georgia 



AKM Alaska Missionary 

BMP Bicol Mission Philippines 

BUR Burundi 

CAM Caribbean & the Americas 

CPA Central Pennsylvania 

CSR Czech and Slovak Republics 

DSW Desert Southwest 

EOH East Ohio 

EPA Eastern Pennsylvania 

FIS Finland-Swedish Provisional 

GNO German North 

ORB Great Britain 

IWA Iowa 

KEN Kentucky 

LSA Louisiana 

MXC Mexico 

MNN Minnesota 

MOW Missouri West 

NEN New England 

NGR Nigeria 

NCA North Carolina 

NGA North Georgia 

NTX North Texas 

NIL Northern Illinois 

NWP Northwest Philippines 

OKL Oklahoma 

PNW Pacific Northwest 

PHI Philippines 

RBM Red Bird Missionary 

SLE Sierra Leone 

SIN South Indiana 



AUS Austria Provisional 

BCP Bulcan Philippines 

CNV California-Nevada 

CIL Central Illinois 

CIX Central Texas 

DKT Dakotas 

DET Detroit 

EPI East Philippines 

EST Estonia Provisional 

FIA Florida 

GSO German South 

HOL Holston 

KSE Kansas East 

LIB Liberia 

LVL Louisville 

MIP Middle Philippines 

MSS Mississippi 

MOZ Mozambique 

NMX New Mexico 

NAL North Alabama 

NNY North Central New York 

NIN North Indiana 

NEP Northeast Philippines 

NNJ Northern New Jersey 

NWT Northwest Texas 

OKI Oklahoma Indian Missionary 

PLW Palawan Provisional 

POL Poland 

RIO Rio Grande 

SCA South Carolina 

SIL Southern Illinois 



Delegate Information 



85 



SNJ Southern New Jersey 

STX Southwest Texas 

TGK Tanganyika 

TRY Troy 

VNM Visayas-North Mindanao Phil. 

WOH West Ohio 

WAN Western Angola 

WPA Western Pennsylvania 

YEL Yellowstone 



SZA Southern Zaire 

SWE Sweden 

TEN Tennessee 

UZA Upper Zaire 

WMI West Michigan 

WVA West Virginia 

WNY Western New York 

WIS Wisconsin 

YUG Yugoslavia Provisional 



SWP Southwest Phlpns Prov. 

SWF Switzerland-France 

TEX Texas 

VIR Virginia 

WMP West Middle Philippines 

WZA West Zaire 

WNC Western North Carolina 

WYO Wyoming 

ZIM Zimbabwe 



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which requires us to give priority to three values: justice, harmony, and 
equality. Political Religion raises these three values to prominence and 
urges that they be embraced as the political agenda for the church. Stith 
examines the Civil Rights Movement, the Church and political 
campaigns, Jesse Jackson and Pat Robertson, coalition building, and 
future proiections. 

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86 



DCA Advance Edition 



HOW TO UNDERSTAND PARLIAMENTARY PROCEDURE 


TO DO THIS 


YOU SAY THIS 


H 


(V. 

T3 

lU 

-a 

0) 

<u 
Z 

1 


n.. 

TO 

c 
.2 
o 


•a 

c 


Vote Needed? 


SECONDARY MOTIONS IN ORDER OF PREFERENCE PROPOSED RULE 19 


Adjourn 


"I move to adjourn." 


no 


yes 


no 


no 


majority 


Recess 


"I move we recess 
until.." 


no 


yes 


no 


no 


majority 


Suspend debate without 
calling for vote 


"'I move that we table" 


no 


yes 


no 


no 


majority 


End debate 


"I move the previous 
question" 


no 


yes 


no 


no 


2/3 majority 


Limit debate 


"I move debate be 
limited to..." 


no 


yes 


no 


yes 


2/3 majority 


Postpone to specific time 


"'I move to postpone this 
matter until..." 


no 


yes 


yes 


yes 


majority 


Have matter studied further 


"'I move we refer this 
matter to..." 


no 


yes 


yes 


yes 


majority 


Amend a motion or substitute 


"I move to amend by..." 
or "I move to 
substitute..." 


no 


yes 


yes 


yes 


majority 


Postpone indefinitely 


"I move to postpone 
indefinitely..." 


no 


yes 


yes 


yes 


majority 


INCIDENTIAL MOTIONS GROW OUT OF THE BUSINESS THE CONFERENCE IS CONSIDERING 


Correct error in 
parliamentary procedure 


"Toint of order" 


yes 


no 


no 


no 


Chair rules 


Obtain advice on 
parliamentary procedure 


"'I raise a parliamentary 
inquiry" 


yes 


no 


no 


no 


Chair rules 


Request information 


"Toint of information" 


yes 


no 


no 


no 


None 


MAIN MOTIONS AS TOOLS TO INTRODUCE NEW BUSINESS 


Introduce business 


"I move that..." 


no 


yes 


yes 


yes 


majority 


Take up matter previously 
tabled^ 


"I move that we take 
from the table..." 


no 


yes 


no 


no 


majority 


Reconsider matter previously 
voted 


"I move we 
reconsider..." 


no 


yes 


Rules 

17 & 

27 


no 


majority 



DCA Advance Edition 



Plan of Organization 
and Rules of Order 

THE GENERAL CONFERENCE OF THE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 



Volume 1 



Nashville, Tennessee 



Report of the Committee on Plan of Organization 
and Rules of Order 



Introduction 

The responsibility for reviewing and suggesting 
amendments for the Plan of Organization and Rules of 
Order has been a rewarding, humbling, and challenging 
experience. 

Our committee has been pleased to work so inti- 
mately with the structural realities of our General Con- 
ference in ways which have increased our appreciation 
of the many traditions of that entity. Nevertheless, we 
have been humbled by the awareness of the contribu- 
tion of those who have gone before us in the develop- 
ment of so much of what makes this legislative body tick, 
and of the investment of so many other people as they 
live out a very important aspect of their ministry as 
delegates to and/or servants of the General Conference. 

Mostiy, we have been challenged by your expecta- 
tions that this body and its various legislative realities 
should be going on to perfection. Clearly there is the 
hope — even the demand — that the functional dimen- 
sions of the General Conference be responsive to the 
great constituency which is The United Methodist 
Church. There is also the expectation that its organiza- 
tional form and operational rules be so finely tuned that 
they enhance and serve the commitment of the many 
delegates in the legislative process. 

Early in its first meeting of the quadrennium, the 
Committee on the Plan of Organization and Rules of 
Order discovered a general sense among its members 
that certain actions on the General Conference might be 
addressed and processed more effectively if alternative 
procedures of discussion and decision could be devised. 

The Committee recognizes that the General Confer- 
ence is fundamentally a legislative body. Procedures in 
place during recent sessions serve the Conference and 
the Church well in dealing with changes in The Book of 
Discipline modif5dng structure and procedure. The proc- 



ess of assigning such matters to Legislative Committees 
for careful examination and recommendation to plenary 
session is affirmed. 

The Committee did identify dissatisfaction with this 
process in certain particulars: 

The assignment to Legislative Committees of some 
issues, study reports and other proposals of broad and 
central concern to the identity and mission of the church 
restricts effective discussion and deliberation of such 
proposals to the members of the Legislative Committee 
involved. Approximately 90% of the General Conference 
delegates to not have opportunity to participate in ex- 
tended group deliberation and dialogue of issues so 
assigned. 

Time available and the number of delegates in ple- 
nary sessions of the General Conference make genuine 
engagement on such issues difficult. Discernment and 
a seeking for wisdom and consensus easily become 
subordinated to parliamentary strategies and win/lose 
voting. 

These realities diminish the sense of many dele- 
gates that the church has deliberated effectively as a part 
of the Body of Christ called to listen well to one another 
and seek together the leadership of the Spirit. 

Therefore, the Committee on the Plan of Organiza- 
tion and Rules of Order proposes that the General Con- 
ference make necessary provisions to receive, 
deliberate upon and decide at least one major proposal 
through an alternative process which the Committee 
has developed and commends to the Conference of its 
use in the 1996 session. That proposal is included in our 
report as Recommendation Number Two, page 106. 

Other than our proposal in Recommendation 
Number Two, we have made no sweeping changes in 
what we present to you. We do want you to know of some 
of the principles which guided our efforts and some of 



88 



DCA Advance Edition 



the objectives which we had. In addition to dealing with 
the recommendations and assimilating the experience 
and observations of the committee members into the 
process, we sought to do these things: 1) Word the Plan 
of Organization and Rules of Order to conform to the 
actual practice which we have followed at General Con- 
ference. 2) Facilitate and clarify the operation where we 
had noted awkward situations. 3) Harmonize General 
Conference with the paragraphs about it as are found in 
the Discipline. 

In carrying out our task, we drew upon the cumula- 
tive experience and observation of those of us who 
labored on the committee. We were emersed in the 
awesome responsibility of the General Conference. 

The commitment to perfection, however, does not 
guarantee that it will happen. It is not possible for any 
one committee to resolve all issues and concerns. We 
had no delusions that we had special talents our prede- 
cessors did not have. We have, however, been diligent 
in efforts to build upon the efforts of those who have 
gone before us. We present our report with the confi- 
dence that we have made some improvements which 
will facilitate the work of General Conference. At the 
same time, we know that those who follow will need to 
review and amend what we have done. 

As this total report is presented to you, we do so with 
these additional comments and observations: 

1. Changes being proposed are indicated in the 
following manner: That which is to be deleted is indi- 
cated by a strikeout , and that which is to be added is 
indicated by boldface type. (The exceptions to this are: 
a) where the change is simply the change of reference 
to another section of the document or to a specific 
portion of the Discipline, and b) in the definition of and 
assignment of paragraphs to the various Legislative 
Committees.) 

2. In keeping with ^ 606 of the Discipline, we note: 
"The Plan of Organization and Rules of Order of the 
General Conference shall be the Plan of Organization 
and Rules of Order as published in the journal of the 
preceding General Conference until they have been 
altered or modified the action of the General Confer- 



3. It is hoped that this plan of Organization and Rules 
of Order will facilitate the democratic process of the 
General Conference by which the will of God and the 
concerns of the people are known and become manifest. 
We thank you in advance for the spirit of humility, 
respect, and cooperation by which you translate this 
document from a mere legal and functional document, 
into a living covenant of faith and responsibility among 
the Delegates. 

Dr. Harvey Manchester, Chair (until July 1995) 
Ms. Carmen Carrico, Vice Chair 



Mr. Robert W. Stevens, Secretary 

The Honorable Jerry G. Bray, Jr. 

Rev. Sandra Forrester Dufresne 

Rev. Richard Hamilton 

Mr. Marvin D. McReynolds 

Mr. David Quee 

Rev. Phylemon Titus 

Ms. Edna L Williams 

Dr. Carolyn Marshall (ex officio) 

Mr. Roger F. Kruse (ex officio) 

Plan of Organization 

I. Opening Session and Organization 

The General Conference shall assemble on the day 
fixed at the place designated in accordance with the 
action taken by the preceding General Conference or 
the Commission on the General Conference. The Holy 
Communion and Memorial Service shall be celebrated 
by the Conference, the Council of Bishops being in 
charge. During the Memorial Service, there shall be 
called the names of the bishops who have died since the 
adjournment of the preceding General Conference, and 
likewise the names of the delegates-elect who have died. 
The opening business session of the Conference shall 
be on the day and at the hour fixed by the Commission 
on the General Conference and shall be called to order 
by the bishop designated, as provided in the Discipline 
15.11. 

The following order of business shall be observed: 

A Roll Call. The record of attendance shall be made 
in writing to the Secretary of the General Conference by: 

(1) The Secretary of the Council of Bishops for the 
bishops, 

(2) The Secretary of the Judicial Council for that 
body, 

(3) The General Secretary of the General Council 
on Ministries for all general secretaries, aft4 

(4) Tlie chairperson of each delegation for its mem- 
bership. Tlie chairperson shall be provided with a form 
on which to report daily the attendance of its members. 
Any reserve seated in the place of a regular delegate 
shall have been duly elected as a reserve delegate by the 
Annual Conference and shall meet the requirements set 
forth in the Discipline 37-39. Delegates, including re- 
serves when the latter are substituted for a delegate or 
delegates, shall be seated in the order of their election, 
except when a reserve is seated temporarily, in which 
case the reserve shall occupy the seat of the delegate for 
whom the substitution is made. All delegates arriving 
after the opening roll call shall be reported by the chair- 



Organization and Rules 



89 



person of the delegation to the Committee on Creden- 
tials. (See Section VIIIA4. and Rule 5. See also Disci- 
pline 607 defining a Quorum.) and 

(5) The chairperson of the delegation for affili- 
ated Autonomous Methodist and United Churches 
delegations. 

B. Establish the bar of die conference. 

BC. Report of The Commission on The General 
Conference. 

GD. Report of The Plan of Organization and Rules 
of Order. 

&E. Elections 

(1) Coordinator of Calendar. (See IV-C) 

(2) Committee on The Plan of Organization and 
Rules of Order. 

(3) Secretory ' Designate. {Discipline, 60 4 ). 

The Council of Biahopa ahall present a nomination 
from the clergy and lay membership of the United Mcth 
odiat Church for Secretary' Designate. Other nomina 
tions shall be permitted from the floor. A time of election 
shall be s cheduled during the session by the Agenda 
Committee The election, if there be two or more nomi 
noe s , shall be by ballot or by electronic voting. The 
Secretary - Designate shall assume the responsibilities of 
the office of secretary as s oon after the adjournment of 
the General Conference a s work in connection with the 
s e s sion has been completed (Discipline, 6 05) . The exact 
date of the tran s fer of responsibility to a secretary - des - 
ignate shall be determined by the Commission on the 
General Conference but shall not be later than Decem - 
ber 31, following the adjournment of the General Con - 
ference. 

EF. Report Of Committee On Agenda. 

EG. Miscellaneous Business. 
GH. Adjournment 

II. Episcopal and Laity Addresses 

The Quadrennial Address of the Council of Bishops 
shall be delivered early in the Conference, at such hour 
as determined by the Commission on the General Con- 
ference. 

The Quadrennial Address of the Laity shall be de- 
livered early in the Conference, at such hour as deter- 
mined by the Commission on the General Conference. 
The National Association of Annual Conference Lay 
Leaders shall be responsible for the preparation and 
presentation of the Quadrennial Lay Address, taking 
care to consult with lay leadership of the Central Con- 
ferences. The National Association of Annual Confer- 



ence Lay Leaders shall enlist participation of men, 
women, youth, young adults, racial and ethnic minori- 
ties, and persons with handicapping conditions in the 
preparation and presentation of the address. 

III. Presiding Officers 

The presiding officers for the several sessions of the 
Conference, the opening session excepted (See Section 
I, above), shall be chosen from among the effective 
bishops by the Committee on Presiding Officers. (See 
Section VIII A6.) 

IV. Secretarial Staff 

A The Secretary of the General Conferenc e, elected 
as hereinbefore provided (Section I.D.3), shall be re- 
sponsible for all functions of the office in preparation for 
the session of the General Conference following that 
election. The Secretary shall keep the record of proceed - 
ing s of all sessions of the General Conference; shall 
compile and edit a Handbook for the General Confer - 
enee; and shall provide corrections to the Daily Ch r is - 
tia n Advocate which serves as the official Journal of the 
General Conference. 

B. Other persons from the ministry or lay member - 
ship of The United Methodist Church shall be selected 
by the Secretary of the General Conference and, after 
approval by the Commission on the General Confer - 
ence, shall form the Secretarial Support Staff. The sec- 
retary shall select persons from the clergy and lay 
membership of The United Methodist church to 
serve on the secretarial support staff. 

C. The Conference shall elect, upon nomination by 
the Secretary, a Coordinator of Calendar, who shall 
assist the Committee on Agenda and Calendar in pre- 
senting reports in such order as to expedite the business 
of the Conference, as well as in other responsibilities of 
the committee. (See I.E.I and VIIIAl). 

D. After ascertaining that petitions, resolutions and 
similar communications, in hand and dealing with the 
regular business of the Conference meet the require- 
men ts therein specified, {Discipline 6 08) of 608 of TTie 
Book of Discipline, the Secretary shall be responsible 
for preparing prepare the same for reference to the 
appropriate s tanding admini s frativc or legislative com- 
mittee, subject to review by the Committee on Refer- 
ence. (See Section VIIIA7.) In the case of a single 
petition signed by a number of people, the Com- 
mittee need print only the name of the first signer 
with an indication of the total number of signers. 

E. The secretary shall appoint the Committee of 
Tellers which shall be compo s ed of sixty persons to act 
as tellers for the purpose of reporting on count vote s 
when voting is not done by eleefronic mean s . The tellers 
shall be divided into two groups of thirty per s ons each. 
If a person who has been appointed as a teller i s elected 
as an officer of a standing committee, he or she shall 



90 



DCA Advance Edition 



E. TTic secretary shall appoint the Committee of 
Tellers which ahall be composed of sixty persona to act 
as tellers for the purpose of reporting on count votes 
when voting is not done by electronic means. The tellers 
shall be divided into two groups of thirty persons each. 
K a person who has been appointed as a teller is elected 
as an officer of a standing committee, he or she shall 
cease serving as a teller and a replacement teller shall 
be appointed by the Secretary. The names of the tellers 
shall be printed in the Daily Chmtian Advocate. 

¥E. The work of the Secretary shall be supervised 
by the Executive Committee of the Commission on the 
General Conference. A budget for the work of the Sec- 
retary shall be presented by the Commission on the 
General Conference to the General Council on Finance 
and Administration. Such budget shall be paid out of the 
General Administration Fund. 

GF. If in the interim of the quadrennial sessions of 
the General Conference the office of Secretary shall for 
any reason be vacated, the Council of Bishops shall elect 
a successor to serve until the next session. 

V. Nominations and Elections. 

The Council of Bishops shall present such nomina 
tions as arc committed to it, for election by the General 
Conference. If any members elected do not serve, the 
Council of Bishops shall name replacements. (See See 
tion W.A) 

The Secretary of The General Conference shall 
develop a timeline for the submission of nomina- 
tions and elections/appointments by the Council 
of Bishops. In making these nominations and 
elections/appointments, attention shall be given 
to ensuring continuity of membership from the 
previous quadrennium. 

It shall be the responsibility of the Coimcil of 
Bishops to present nominations for The Commis- 
sion on the General Conference, Committee on 
Plan of Organization and Rules of Order, Commis- 
sion on Central Conference Affairs, General Con- 
ference standing committees and secretary- 
designate of The General Conference. These nomi- 
nations shall be presented to the General Confer- 
ence for election. 

Disciplinary provisions shall govern the nomi- 
nation and election procedures for: 

General Council on Finance and Administra- 
tion {% 905) 

General Board of Pension and Health Benefits 
(1 1602.1O) 

General Commission on Archives and History 
(1 1804.2) 

The University Senate (^ 1517.2) 



The Judicial Council (M 2602, 2603) 
Episcopal membership on: 

General Board of Chtirch and Society (^ 

805.26) 

General Board of Discipleship {% 805.26) 

General Board of Global Ministries (^ 805.26, 
% 1412.6)) 

General Board of Higher Education and Min- 
istry (1805.26) 

VI. Commission on The General Conference. 

A TTiere shall be a Commission on the General 
Conference composed of one clergy and one layperson 
fi-om each Jurisdiction and four members-at-large, at 
least one of whom shall be from an Annual Conference 
outside the United States, who shall be nominated by 
the Council of Bishops at its Fall meeting next preceding 
the General Conference and elected by the General 
Conference for a term of eight years, half of whom shall 
be elected by the General Conference each quadren- 
nium. If vacancies occur, the Council of Bishops 
shall elect successors to serve until the next ses- 
sion of the General Conference and then nominate 
for election by tiie General Conference persons to 
serve any remainder of the term. The Secretary of 
the General Conference, the Treasurer of the General 
Council on Finance and Administration, and the Busi- 
ness Manager of the General Conference shall also be 
members ex-officio but without vote. If vacancies occur, 
the Council of Bishops shall elect successors to serve 
until the next session of the General Conference and 
then nominate for election by the General Conference 
persons to serve any remainder of the term. The Com- 
mission may elect two additional merabers-at-large for 
each quadrennium. 

The Council of Bishops shall designate one of its 
members to convene and organize the Commission 
before the adjournment of the General Conference. 

B. This Commission shall determine the place and 
time (within such limits as may be set up by the General 
Conference) of the next General Conference and shall 
send an official notice to all elected delegates announc- 
ing specifically the opening day and hour of the General 
Conference and anticipated time of adjournment It shall 
further advise the General Conference delegates in ad- 
vance of all such special events and orders of the day, 
the dates and times of which have been determined prior 
to the opening of the (General Conference, in order that 
the delegates may have an overview of the General 
Conference program. The Commission shall make all 
necessary arrangements in connection therewith, in- 
cluding arrangements for the publication of the Daily 
Christian Advocate and quadrennial reports of the gen- 
eral agencies of the church, the same to be published by 



Organization and Rules 



91 



the United Methodist Publishing House. The Daily 
Christian Advocate shall print the list of nominees for 
election to the Judicial Council, with biographical 
sketches not to exceed 100 words in length for each 
nominee. 

C. The Commission shall take the necessary 
measure to assure full participation of all General 
Conference Delegates, including providing accom- 
modation for language and physical challenges. 

GD. The Commission shall plan the schedule for the 
opening day of the Conference. 

GE. The Commission shall recommend to the Gen- 
eral Conference the per diem allowance to be paid to the 
elected delegates. (See Section X.) 

EF. The Secretary, on behalf of the Commission on 
the General Conference, shall issue invitations to ecu- 
menical representatives after consultation with the 
Council of Bishops and The General r,ommissinn no 
Christian Unity and Interreligious ^v/nwcms. me 
Commission shall theft arrange for local hospitality 
and presentation of ecumenical representatives 
their presentation to the General Conferenc e and for 
their local entertainment during the specific period of 
time required for their presence . The term ecumenical 
representatives shall be interpreted to include only per - 
sons who have been duly elected by the Christian com - 
munions of which they arc rcapcctivcly members to 
represent the same before the General Conference; who 
pre s ent the appropriate credentials of such elections; 
and have been invited through the Commission on the 
General Conference, after consultation with the Council 
of Bishops. All communications, credentials, and infor - 
mation in the hands of the Secretary of the General 
Conference or the Council of Bishops relating to ecu - 
menical representatives shall be referred to the Com - 
mission. 

FG. The Commission is authorized, if it deems it 
advisable, to select the site of the General Conference 
two quadrennia in advance. 

VII. Plan of Organization and Rules of Order. 

A. There shall be a Committee on Plan of Organiza- 
tion and Rules of Order of ten members, including 
membership from each of the Jurisdictions and from 
Annual Conferences outside the United States, nomi- 
nated from the elected delegates to the General Confer- 
ence by the Council of Bishops at its Fall meeting ftejtt 
preceding the General Conference and elected by the 
General Conference for a term of four years. Members 
may be elected for additional terms of four years, 
provided no more than four members of the new 
committee are returning members. The Secretary 
and Business Manager of the Conference shall be ex-of- 
ficio members without vote. The Council of Bishops 
shall designate one of its members to convene and 
organize this committee after it is elected. 



Outgoing members of the committee present 
at General Conference may meet with the newly 
elected committee during the current sessions of 
General Conference. These outgoing members 
will have voice but no vote. 

B. To this committee shall be referred any proposed 
amendments to the Plan of Organization and Rules of 
Order (See Rule 39) . To it may be referred any other 
matters relating to parliamentary order or procedure in 
the business of the General Conference. 

C. This committee shall serve as an Interim Com- 
mittee between sessions of the General Conference. 
The committee shall restudy the Plan of Organization 
and Rules of Order and make needed changes and 
adaptations and after printing in the Advance DCA shall 
present them to the General Conference for considera- 
tion and final action, same to be published in the Daily 
Christian Advocate which serves as the Journal of the 
General Conference. 

D. The Plan of Organization and Rules of Order of 
the General Conference shall be the Plan of Organiza- 
tion and Rules of Order as published in the Journal of 
the preceding General Conference until they have been 
altered or modified by action of the General Conference 
(Discipline, 606.) 

VIII. Committees 

The General Conference shall have the standing 
committees hereinafter indicated, with such functions, 
responsibilities, and limitations respectively as are here- 
inafter prescribed, and such special committees as it 
may order. 

A. Standing Administrative Committees 

The members of the following committees shall be 
appointed by the Council of Bishops at its Fall meeting 
ftext preceding the General Conference. All except the 
Committee on Correlation and Editorial Revision shall 
be from the elected delegates to the General Confer- 
ence. (See Section V.) Members of standing admin- 
istrative committees which meet prior to the day 
on which the General Conference convenes, shall 
receive the delegate per diem for each additional 
day on which their attendance is required. Dele- 
gates who are nominated for such committees less 
than 60 days prior to the opening session of Gen- 
eral Conference shall be entitied to reimburse- 
ment for any additional transportation costs. 

(1) Agenda and Calendar 

(a) There shall be a Committee on Agenda and 
Calendar of eight members, at least four of whom 
shall be laypersons, to be constituted as follows: 
one from each Jurisdiction, one from Annual Con- 
ferences outside the United States, the chairperson 
of the Committee on Calendar when elected, the Coor- 



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dinator of the Calendar, and the chairperson or sub- 
stitute for the Chairperson of the Program Committee 
of the Commission on the General Conference. No 
member of the committee shall be chauijerson of 
a Standing Legislative Committee or a director or 
staff person of any general agency. The Committee 
shall be convened, for the purpose of organization, by 
the Secretary of the General Conference at least the day 
before the opening of the General Conference. 

Following the presentation and adoption of the 
report of the Commission on the General Confer- 
ence at the opening session of die General Confer- 
ence, the Committee on Agenda and Calendar 
shall immediately become responsible for guiding 
the order of business of tiie Conference. 

(b) The Committee on Agenda and Calendar 
shall: 

(1) Present calendar reports in such an order 
as to expedite the business of the Conference, 

(2) Inform the bishop presiding as soon as 
possible of the agenda items, including order of 
priority, to be considered, 

(3) Keep an overview of calendar progress; 

(4) Report to each session of the General Con- 
ference recommendations concerning business 
agenda, including time allocation and order in 
which legislative committee reports shall be 
printed; 

(5) Give priority to calendar items as soon as 
they 4u-e available; 

(6) Give priority to calendar items involving 
minority reports; 

(7) Announce, at the last plenary session of 
each day, a tentative agenda for the next day; 

(8) Consult daily with the legislative commit- 
tee chairpersons to expedite the business of the 
General Conference; and 

(9) Receive all requests for special orders of 
the day, except those requested in the report of the 
Commission on the General Conference on the 
first day of the Conference. 

(b) The Committee shall consult vnth the Council 
of Bishops, the Commission on the General Conference, 
and the Secretary of the General Conference concerning 
pending business. 

(c) Follosying the presentation and adoption of the 
report of the Commission on the General Conference at 
the opening session of the General Conference, the 
Committee on Agenda shall immediately become re - 



sponsible for helping guide the order of business of the 
Conference. 

(d) To this committee s hall be referred all reque s t s 
for special orders of the day, except those requested in 
the report of the Commission on the General Confer 
encc on the first day of the Conference. 

(ec) Proposals, questions, communications, resolu- 
tions, and other matters not included in the regular 
business of the General Conference shall be referred to 
the Committee on Agenda and Calendar without mo- 
tion or debate. This committee shall determine whether 
or not the matter presented shall be considered by the 
General Conference. Appeal from the decision of this 
committee may be presented to the Conference upon 
the written signature of twenty members delegates ©f 
the Conference , and the item shall be presented to the 
Conference if the appeal is supported by a one-third vote. 

(f) The Committee on Agenda shall report to each 
session of the General Conference its recommendations 
concerning business agenda and time allocations for the 
various reports and business items, except that at all 
times the Committee on Calendar shall determine the 
order in which legislative committee report s shall be 
presented. Priority shall be given to calendar items as 
soon as they ore available. At the last plenary session of 
each day, a tentative agenda for the next day shall be 
announced. 

(g) The chairper s on of the Committee on Agenda, 
in consultation with the chairperson of the Committee 
on Calendar, shall inform the presiding officer as s oon 
as possible of the agenda items to be con s idered. 

(3) Colcndar. 

(a) There shall be a Committee on Calendar of five 
members. None of them shall be chairperson of a Stand 
ing Legislative Committee or a member or s taff per s on 
of any general agency. The Secretary' of the General 
Conference shall convene the committee for the pur - 
pose of organisation. The committee, after consultation 
with the Coordinator of Calendar (See Section IV. C), 

(b) Present calendar reports in such an order so a s 
to expedite the business of the Conference, 

(e) inform the Committee on Presiding Officers, as 
far ahead as is feasible, of the calendar to be considered, 

(d) inform the presiding bishop of the priority status 
of the calendar, 

(e) keep an overview of calendar progress, 

(f) give priority to calendar items involving minority 
reports, and 



Organization and Rules 



93 



(g) consult daily with the legislative committee 
chairpersons to expedite the buaincaa of the General 
Conference. 

(92) Correlation and Editorial Revision. 

There shall be a Committee on Correlation and 
Editorial revision of four persons not members of the 
General Conference and the Book-Editor, who shall be 
an ex-officio member. They shall be entitled to reim- 
bursement of expenses for attendance at meetings of the 
committee. Two alternates shall be appointed by the 
Council of Bishops. The Book Editor shall convene the 
committee for the purpose of organization. The function 
of this committee shall be: 

(a) To review all proposed legislation reported in the 
Daily Christian Advocate and that presented in special 
reports to the General Conference. The Committee shall 
report to the standing committees concerned, or to the 
General Conference as the situation may warrant, all 
contradictions, duplications, and inconsistencies discov- 
ered therein . 

(b) To assure that, when a calendar item approved 
on the Consent Calendar or under an omnibus vote is 
found to be in conflict with parts of another calendar item 
discussed and voted upon at a plenary session, the item 
discussed and voted shall prevail. 

(c) To edit the Discipline in accordance with Section 
XI.B. 

(43) Courtesies and Privileges. 

There shall be a Committee on Courtesies and Privi- 
leges of six members composed of one repre- 
sentative from each Jurisdiction and one 
representative from Annual Conferences outside 
the United States. The committee shall be con- 
vened by a Bishop for the purpose of organization. 

The committee has the following duties and respon- 
sibilities: 

(a) To consider, as presented to it by members of 
the Conference, what said members regard as questions 
or matters of privilege, to decide whether they are such 
or not, and if they are regarded as being such, to recom- 
mend to the Conference that they be heard. 

(b) To consider resolutions of commendation, cour- 
tesy, appreciation, etc., submitted in writing by dele- 
gates. TTie committee may initiate similar resolutions 
and edit and amend those submitted to it Resolutions 
approved by the committee shall be printed in the Daily 
Christian Advocate and brought to the floor if the com- 
mittee considers them of unusual importance or ur- 
gency. 

(c) To arrange for extending courtesies of the Con- 
ference to any to whom they may be due, ecumenical 
representatives and official visitors excepted. 



(d) To limit its report, including the statement of the 
chairperson and the hearing of such persons as may be 
presented, to a maximum of ten minutes in any one 
business day. No person or persons shall be presented 
whose request has been denied by the Commission on 
the General Conference, nor after the sbcth day unless 
approved by a two-thirds vote of the Conference. (See 
Rule 26.3.) 

(S4) Credentials. 

There shall be a Committee on Credentials of sbc 
members, composed of one representative delegate 
from each Jurisdiction and one representative delegate 
from Annual Conferences outside the United States. 
The committee shall be convened by a Bishop for the 
purpose of organization. 

To this Committee, the chairpersons of the respec- 
tive annual conference delegations shall report on a form 
provided for that purpose any change in seating of dele- 
gates, indicating the length of time for which the change 
shall be effective. (See Section IA4.) The chairperson 
of this committee shall make a daily written report to the 
Secretary of the General Conference, listing all changes 
of seating approved by the Committee. In the event of 
questions which may arise regarding the eligibility of 
seating any delegates, this Committee shall report di- 
rectly to the General Conference with its recommenda- 
tions. (See Rule 5.) 

(€5) Joiunzd. 

There shall be a Committee on the Journal of three 
members to approve daily the record of Proceed- 
ings of the General Conference prepared by the 
Secretary and assistant(s). The committee shall be 
convened by a Bishop for the purpose of organiza- 
tion. 

(?6) Presiding Officers. 

There shall be a committee on Presiding Officers of 
twelve members, composed of one clergy and one 
layperson from each Jurisdiction and one clergy 
and one layperson from among the delegates rep- 
resenting the Annual Conferences outside the 
United States. The committee shall be convened 
by a Bishop for the purpose of organization. 

The Committee shall select and notify the presiding 
officer(s) of each session at least 24 hours in advance, 
insofar as possible. The Committee shall be free to select 
a bishop for more than one session and to change the 
presiding officer during the session, whenever it seems 
advisable. (See Section III.) 

(87) Reference. 

There shall be a Committee on Reference of sbcteen 
per s ons members, composed of one clergy and one lay 
representative delegate from each Jurisdiction, one 
clergy and one laypefsoft delegate from Annual Confer- 



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DCA Advance Edition 



ences outside the United States, and four members-at- 
large. The membership of this committee shall include 
at least one member from each legislative committee. 
This committee shall be convened, for the purpose of 
organization, by the Secretary of the General Confer- 
ence prior to and at the scat the day prior to the 
opening of the General Conference. 

(a) After reviewing the proposed assignments by 
the Secretary to standing committees of the petitions, 
resolutions, and similar communications dealing with 
the regular business of the Conference, this committee 
shall refer the same to the appropriate standing admin 
istrativc or legislative committees. (See Section IV.D.) 
One member of each legislative committee serving on 
this committee shall be designated to coordinate peti- 
tions assigned to his/her respective legislative commit- 
tee. This committee shall also be responsible for 
reviewing the assignment, by the Secretary of the book 
of printed Quadrennial Rcporta , all reports, recommen- 
dations, and resolutions from general agencies, stand- 
ing or special commissions and committees, and all 
other communications which shall come into the Secre- 
tary's hands after the convening of the General Confer- 
ence, all of which shall be referred directiy to 
appropriate legislative committees without presentation 
to a plenary session of the General Conference. 

(b) The Committee on Reference may withdraw a 
paper that has been assigned to a committee, either 
upon a request or upon its own motion. It may also 
withhold from reference or publication any document it 
shall deem improper. 

(c) Where the Committee finds two or more sub- 
stantially identical petitions, it may group them under 
one title and number, indicating the total number of 
petitions. In the case of a s ingle petition signed by a 
number of people, the Committee need print only the 
name of the first signer with an indication of the total 
number of signers. 

(d) No petitions shall be assigned by the Committee 
on Reference to any General Conference Committee 
unless they meet the requfrements of 608. 1.2 of the Book 
of Discipline. 

B. Commission on Central Conference AfiEairs. 

(For membership, see Discipline, 2301.) 

To this Commission shall be referred all petitions, 
resolutions, etc., relating to the Central Conferences, 
Autonomous Churches, Affiliated Churches, Affiliated 
United Churches and Concordant relationships (Disci- 
pline, 26-34, 528, 636-654, 2301.) 

The Commission on Central Conference Affairs 
shall submit its report and any legislative proposals 
related to the paragraphs assigned to it directly to the 
General Conference. 



If the Commission on Central Conference Affairs 
has a concern for any paragraphs assigned to one of the 
legislative committees, the commission shall offer its 
recommendation to the appropriate legislative commit- 
tee for consideration and recommendation to the Gen- 
eral Conference. 



C. Standing Legislative Committees. 

The General Conference shall have the following 
standing legislative committees, which shall consider all 
proposals looking toward new legislation or changes in 
the present legislation of the church, including all re- 
ports and recommendations from general agencies, and 
standing or special commissions or committees, and 
report recommendations relating thereto the Confer- 



Any legislative committee considering legislation 
affecting the concerns of the Commission on Cenfral 
Conference Affairs shall consult with the Commission 
before submitting its proposed legislation to the General 
Conference. 

(1) Church and Society. 

To this committee shall be referred all petitions, 
resolutions, etc., relating to the statement of Social Prin- 
ciples, social issues, and the work and concerns of the 
Board of Church and Society. 

Discipline paragraphs 



70-76 


Social Principles 


728 


AC: Board of Church and Society 


753 


District Director 


1101-1115 


General Board of Church and Society 


(2) Conferences. 



To this committee shall be referred all petitions, 
resolutions, etc., relating to the composition and activi- 
ties of the General, Jurisdictional, Aiinual, Provisional, 
Missionary, and Disfrict Conferences, and Missions, 
including the Jurisdictional, Annual and District Confer- 
ence Councils on Minisfries. 

Discipline paragraphs 

7-11 Constitution: Conferences 

12-15 Constitution: General Conference 

21-25 Constitution: Jurisdictional Conferences 

35-39 Constitution: Annual Conferences 

40-44 Constitution: Boundaries 

45 Constitution: Disfrict Conferences 

505-507 Election, Assignment of Bishops 



Organization and Rules 



95 



601-611 General Conference (including 

opening statement) 

612-627 Jurisdictional Conference 

628, 630 Jurisdictional Agencies 

629 Jurisdictional Council on Ministries 

655-658 Provisional Annual Conferences 

659-662 Missionary Conference 

663-664 Mission 

701-707 Annual Conference 

726 AC: Council on Ministries 

747 AC: Ministry to Persons with 

Handicapping Conditions 

749-750 District Conference 

752 District Council on Ministries 

Report Global Nature of the Church 

(3) Discipleship. 

To this committee shall be referred all petitions, 
resolutions, etc., relating to the work and concerns of 
the Boards of Discipleship, and the report of the Study 
on Baptism. 

Discipline paragraphs 

65-69 Doctrine 

278-281 LC: Lay Speaking 

282 LC: Lay Preacher 

632 JYMO Convocation 

635 JC: Committee of UMM 

729 AC: Board of Discipleship 

730 AC: Board of Laity 

743 AC: CYM 

744 AC: United Methodist Men 

745 AC: CYM 

751 District Lay Leader 

757 District Board of Laity 

758 District Committee on Lay Speaking 

761 DC: United Methodist Men 

762 District CYM 

1201-1206 General Board of Discipleship 

1207-1210 GBOD: Education 

1211-1215 GBOD: Evangelism, Worship and 

Stewardship 

1216-1222 GBOD: Ministry of the Laity 

1223 GBOD: UMM 

1224-1229 GOD: Curriculum Resources 

Committee 



1301-1311 
Report 



NYMO 

Study on Baptism 



(4) Financial Administration. 

To this committee shall be referred all petitions, 
resolutions, etc., relating to the work and concerns of 
the Council on Finance and Administration, the Board 
of Pension and Health Benefits, and the Board of Publi- 
cation. The budget and recommendations prepared by 
the General Council on Finance and Administration 
shall be submitted to this committee for study and 
review. Thereafter, when the General Council on Fi- 
nance and Administration presents its report to the 
General Conference for action, the committee shall pre- 
sent its recommendations and may propose amend- 
ments. 



Discipline ] 


jaragraphs 


6 


Constitution: Title to Properties 


20 


Constitution: Restrictive Rule 


708-716 


AC: Council on Finance 
and Administration 


717-725 


AC: Clergy Support 


736 


Episcopal Residence 


737 


AC: Board of Pensions 


746 


AC: Joint Committee on Disability 


901-909 


General Council on Finance 
and Administration 


910-913 


GCFA: General Funds 


916 


GCFA; Special Days Offerings 


917-922 


GCFA: General Funds 


923-932 


GCFA: Episcopal Fund 


1601-1605 


General Board of Pension 
and Health Benefits 


1606-1609 


Annual Conference Pension 
Administration 


1701-1743 


General Board of Publications 


2501-2524 


Church Property 


2554 


Trustees of Church Institutions 



(5) General Administration/Judicial Admini- 
stration. 

To this committee shall be referred all petitions, 
resolutions, etc., relating to the work and concerns of 
the General Council on Ministries, including the Ad- 
vance, Judicial Administration, and the report of the Site 
Selection Task Force. 

The report of the General Council on Ministries 
shall be submitted to this committee for study and 
review. Thereafter, when the General Council on Minis- 
tries presents its report to the General Conference for 



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DCA Advance Edition 



action, the committee shall present its recommenda- 
tions and may propose amendments. 

Discipline paragraphs 

1-4 Constitution: General 

(including Preamble) 

16-17, 19 Constitution: Restrictive Rules 

58-61 The Judiciary 

62-64 Constitution: Amendments 

274-277 Local Church Special Sundays 

727 AC: Advance Program 

748 AC: Committee on Native American 

Ministry 

801-825 Administrative Order: General 

Provisions 

914-915 The Advance 

1001-1007 General Council on Ministries 

2601-2621 Judicial Council 

2622-2628 Investigation, Trials and Appeals 

Report Connectional Issues 

Report Site Selection Task Force 

(6) Global Ministries. 

To this committee shall be referred all petitions, 
resolutions, etc., relating to the work and concerns of 
the Boards of Global Ministries, and the report on His- 
panic and Native American Ministries. 

Discipline paragraphs 

634 JC: United Methodist Women 

731 AC: Board of Global Ministiies 

743 AC: United Metiiodist Women 

760 DC: United Metiiodist Women 

1401-1412 General Board of Global Ministries 

1413-1417 GBGM: National Division 

1418-1421 GBGM: Office of Deaconess 

1422-1430 GBGM: Women's Division 

1431-1439 GBGM: World Division 

1440-1448 GBGM: Healtii and Welfare Ministries 

1449-1453 GBGM: Mission Education 

and Cultivation 

1454-1458 GBGM: Mission Personnel Resources 

1459-1468 GBGM: UM Committee on Relief 

Report Hispanic Ministires 

Report Native American Ministries 



(7) Higher Education and Chaplaincy. 

To this committee shall be referred all petitions, 
resolutions, etc., relating to the work and concerns of 
Higher Education, Schools of Theology, and the Divi- 
sion of Chaplaincy and Related Ministries. 

Discipline paragraphs 
732 AC: Board of Higher Education 

and Campus Ministry 

1501-1509 General Board of Higher Education 

and Ministry 

1510-1512 GBHEM: Division of Chaplains 

and Related Ministries 

1513-1523 GBHEM: Division of Higher Education 

1530-1532 GBHEM: Schools of Theology 

(8) Independent Commissions 

To this committee shall be referred all petitions, 
resolutions, etc., relating to commissions, and ecumeni- 
cal concerns. This shall include Archives and History, 
Christian Unity and Interrellgious Concerns, Communi- 
cations, Religion and Race, Status and Role of Women, 
and membership or relationship to the World Methodist 
Council, Councils and Consultations of Churches, the 
American Bible Society, and the report on the Consult- 
ation on Church Union. 

Discipline paragraphs 



5 
631 


Constitution: Ecumenical Relations 

JC: Commission on Archives 
and History 


738 


AC: Commission on Archives 
and History 


739 


AC: Commission on Christian Unity 
and Interrellgious Concerns 


740 


AC: Commission on Religion and Race 


741 


AC: Commission on Status and Role 
of Women 


742 


AC: Commission on Small Membership 
Church 


754 


DC: Director Ethnic Local Church 
Concerns 


755 


DC: Director Religion and Race 


1801-1812 


General Commission on Archives and 
History 


1901-1909 


General Commission on 
Communications 


2001-2006 


General Commission on Christian 
Unity and Interrellgious Concerns 


2101-2108 


General Commission on Religion 
and Race 


2201-2209 


General Commission on Status 



and Role of Women 



Organization and Rules 



97 



2401-2406 
Report 

(9) Local Church 



Interdenominational Agencies 
Consultation on Church Union 



Report 



Study of Ministry 



To this committee shall be referred all petitions, 
resolutions, etc., relating to the organization of the local 
church and its membership, programs, boards, coun- 
cils, commissions, committees, etc., or relating to local 
church property. 

Discipline paragraphs. 

4647 Constitution: Charge Conferences 

101-107 Mission and Ministry of the Church 

111-114 

201-207 Local Church 

208-243 LC: Church Membership 

244-270 LC: Organization and Administration 

271-273 LC: General 

2525-2553 LC: Property 

(10) Ordained and Diaconal Ministry. 

To this committee shall be referred all petitions, 
resolutions, etc., relating to the work of the ordained 
ministry, diaconal ministry, superintendency, and the 
report of the Study of Ministry. 

Discipline paragraphs 
18 Constitution: Restrictive Rule 

48-57 

108-110 

301-317 

401459 

501-504 

508-516 

517-525 



Constitution: Episcopal Supendsion 

Representative Ministry 

Diaconal Ministry 

Ordained Ministry 

Superintendency 

Superintendency: Bishops 

Superintendency: District 
Sut 



iperintendents 

526-527,529 Expressions of Superintendency 

530-534 Appointment-Making 

633 JC: Committee on Ordained 

and Diaconal Ministries 

733 AC: Board of Ordained Ministry 

734 AC: Board of Diaconal Ministry 

735 AC: Committee on Episcopacy 

756 DC: Committee on Ordained Ministry 

759 DC: Committee on Episcopacy 

1524-1526 GBHEM: Division of Diaconal 

Ministry 

1527-1529 GBHEM: Division of Ordained 

Ministry 



Report and recommendations of the Study of Ministry 
include amendments to TI^ 38, 101-1532. 

D. Membership of Standing Legislative Com- 
mittees. 

(1) Each delegate shall serve as a member of one of 
the standing legislative committees numbered 1 to 44 
10. Within the annual conference delegation each mem- 
ber shall choose from the legislative committees 1 to -H- 
10 the committee on which to serve, the choice being 
made in order of election. Beginning with 1988, the 
clergy first elected, shall be entitled to the first choice, 
the lay delegate first elected, the second choice, and 
thus the right of choice shall continue to alternate be- 
tween clergy and lay delegates in the order of their 
election. For subsequent General Conferences, first 
choice shall alternate between the lay and clergy dele- 
gates, provided that two members of a delegation may 
not serve on any one of the above-designated standing 
legislative committees 1 to -ti 10 unless the said dele- 
gation is represented on each of them. All delegations 
composed of twelve eleven or more members shall 
assign all members in excess of eleven ten according to 
this same principle of distribution. (For example, a con- 
ference with sbcteen delegates shall have two members 
on each of any five six of these eleven ten committees 
and one on each of the remaining six four. Similarly, a 
conference with 35 delegates shall have four members 
on each of two five committees and three on each of the 
remaining «ifte five. Each delegate may, in the order 
herein indicated, select any one of these eleven ten 
committees, provided that the foregoing division of the 
delegates among the committees is maintained.) When- 
ever a delegation has more than one member on a 
legislative committee, its members shall be divided as 
equally as possible between lay and clergy. Thus, if there 
are three members on a committee, they shall be two 
clergy and one lay or vice versa. 

(2) If a matter is under consideration in any standing 
legislative committee which in the judgment of any 
annual conference delegation vitally affects the interests 
of its constituency, and if the said annual conference is 
not represented in the membership of said committee, 
then the said delegation may choose one of its members 
to represent its annual conference in the committee 
when the matter judged to be vital to the interests of this 
constituency is under consideration. Such a person shall 
be entitled to sit with the committee while this particular 
matter is being considered and shall be entitled to the 
floor, subject to such limitations as are imposed on the 
regular members of said committee, but shall not be 
entitied to vote. (See Section VIII.E.4.) 

(3) Each person seated in the General Conference 
with the right to speak but not vote may submit to the 
Secretary of the General Conference a choice of a legis- 
lative committee and shall have the same right in that 
committee to speak but not to vote. 



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E. Meeting of Committees. 

(1) For Organization. All standing legislative and 
administi'ative committees shall meet for organization 
at such time as the Commission on the General Confer- 
ence shall determine. Abishop appointed by the Council 
of Bishops and an assistant secretary appointed by the 
Secretary of the General Conference shall serve, respec- 
tively, as chairperson and secretary to effect an organi- 
zation in each of the several standing committees, 
except where other provision is specified. The first meet- 
ing of the legislative committees shall be held as soon 
as possible following the first plenary session of the 
General Conference. The orientation of the committee, 
followed by the election of officers, shall be the order of 
business of the first meeting of the committee. 

(a) The election of chairperson, vice-chairperson, 
and Secretary of each standing committee, both admin- 
istrative and legislative, shall be by ballot. 

(b) The Secretary of the General Conference shall 
be responsible for arranging for a training session for all 
chairpersons, vice-chairpersons, and secretaries of leg- 
islative committees as soon as possible after their elec- 
tions. The training shall include instruction in their 
duties, all procedures in the handling of petitions, the 
times of the daily deadline for publishing reports, and 
other information to expedite the work of the commit- 
tees. The Commission on the General Conference is 
requested to arrange for a time and place for such a 
training session. 

(2) Regular Meetings. The standing legislative com- 
mittees 1 to ii 10 inclusive shall meet for business as 
scheduled by the Agenda Committee unless otherwise 
ordered by the Conference, until their work is com- 
pleted, and at such other times as the committees may 
themselves determine. 

(3) Quorum for Committee Meetings. A majority of 
the members shall constitute a quorum for the transac- 
tion of business in all committees. 

(4) Each legislative committee shall establish an 
area in which only voting committee members will be 
seated. Staff, resource persons, and visitors may speak 
only when authorized, in each instance by specific com- 
mittee action. (See Section VIII.D.2.) 

(5) Legislative committees are urged to give priority 
to significant and controversial legislation so that their 
reports on such matters may be printed as soon as 
possible in the Daily Christian Advocate and considered 
by the General Conference. 

(6) Minority reports should be encouraged so that 
differing views held by a significant portion of the com- 
mittee may be carefully prepared and expressed and the 
issues clearly defined for decision by the General Con- 
ference. Adequate time should be given for the minority 
to prepare its report and every effort made to have the 



majority and minority reports printed together in the 
Daily Christian Advocate (See Rules 16, 32, 33 and 35). 

F. Function and Authority Of Committees 

(1) The standing administrative committees, with- 
out specific instruction or direction fi"om the Confer- 
ence, shall assume responsibility for considering and 
reporting to the Conference upon all matters which 
would logically fall within their respective purviews, if it 
seems wise to do so , 09 these arc indicated hereinbefore . 

(2) The standing legislative committees may not 
originate business, but shall consider and report only 
upon that which is referred to them by the Committee 
on Reference, or which has been referred to them di- 
rectiy by the Conference and processed by the Commit- 
tee on Reference. (See Rule 30.) 

IX. Proposal Involving Expenditure 
of Unbudgeted Funds 

'V\Ticn any proposal ia 9ubmittcd to the General 
Conference to establish an interim or continuing board, 
commission, or committee, and at that point the pro - 
posal shall state an estimated coat of the proposal, before 
final action is taken by the General Conference estab - 
lishing auch board, commission, or committee, aaid 
proposal ahall be referred to the General Council on 
Finance and Administration or its executive committee, 
with the request that it bring to the General Conference 
an estimated budget of the expense of operation of the 
proposed board, commission, or committee for the next 
quadrennium and a atatcment of how the adoption of 
such proposal will affect the budget or budgets for the 
existing boards, commissions, or committees as already 
presented by the General Council on Finance and Ad - 
ministration. When any proposal is submitted to the 
General Conference which involves the expenditure of 
funds not included in an established budget, auch pro - 
poaal ahall be referred for advice and recommendation 
to the General Council on Finance and Administration 
before final action i s token by the General Conference. 

A. Any proposal submitted to the General Con- 
ference to establish an interim or continuing 
board, commission, committee or task force shall 
be referred to the General Coimcil on Finance and 
Administration or its executive committee for a 
report and recommendation before final action is 
taken. 

The General Council on Finance and Admini- 
stration or its executive committee shall provide 
the General Conference with tiie following before 
action is taken: 

(1) an estimated budget for the proposed 
board, commission, committee or task force for 
the next quadrennitmi; and 



Organization and Rules 



99 



(2) a statement explaining how the creation of 
die proposed board, commission, committee, or 
task force will affect the budget or budgets for 
existing boards, commissions, committees and 
task forces already presented by the General 
Council on Finance and Administration. 

B. Any proposal submitted to the General 
Conference wWch involves the expenditure of 
funds not included in the established budget shall 
be referred to the General Council on Finance and 
Administration for advice and recommendation 
before final action is taken. 

X. Delegates' Expense Accounts 

A. The report of the chairperson of the respective 
annual conference delegations shall be the basis for 
settlennient with principal and reserve delegates for their 
per diem allowances. The total traveling expense includ- 
ing per diem shall be payable to the principal delegate if 
present and seated. K during the Conference a reserve 
delegate is seated for a principal delegate for one or 
more full days, the principal delegate shall adjust the per 
diem with such reserve on the basis of the time served 
by each. 

B. Full travel expenses and per diem shall be 
paid for the number of allotted delgates from each 
conference whether those delegates are principal 
or reserve. 

BC. Air travel expense shall be on the basis of the 
most economical roundtrip tourist/coach air fare di- 
rectly to and from the seat of the General Conference. 
Special excursion and promotional fares shall be utilized 
whenever possible. Additional expenses may be allowed 
delegates from Annual Conferences outside the United 
States for arrival and departure not to exceed two days 
in cither case before or after General Conference. 
Unavoidable cxccptiona to this limitation of two days 
before and two days after General Conference, due to 
tranaportation achcdulcs, must be approved by the Gen 
cral Council on Finance and Administration. The per 
diem expense allowance for all such days before and 
after General Conference shall be at the same rate as 
granted delegates during General Conference. Excep- 
tions to these limitations must be approved by the 
Business Manager of the General Conference. 

D. When one or more delegates come in the same 
automobile, the owner will be allowed the established 
rate per mile plus the cost of room and meals en route 
up to the established General Conference per diem rate. 
Guest passengers who are the principal delegates to the 
General Conference shall submit only the cost of room 
and meals en route up to the established General Con- 
ference per diem rate. Maximum use of automobiles for 
travel may not exceed 1,000 miles roundtrip, for reim- 
bursement purposes. If automobile travel exceeds 1000 
miles roundtrip, reimbursement will be based upon the 
most economical roundtrip tourist/coach air fare, or the 



mileage reimbursement, whichever is less. In all cases 
delegates shall report only the actual cost of travel. 

GE. For the dates General Conference is in session, 
no General Conference delegate shall receive expense 
money from the general church or any of its boards and 
agencies other than approved per diem and travel ex- 
penses available to all delegates. This provision docs not 
apply to members of a body required by the Discipline 
to convene at general conference. This provision is not 
to restrict financial assistance to delegates from their 
own annual conferences. 

XI. Material to be Included in The Discipline 

A. No non-legislative material shall be ordered 
printed in the Discipline without first referring it to the 
committee on Correlation and Editorial Revision for 
consideration and report to the General Conference for 
further consideration and final action. 

B. The Book Editor, the Secretary of the General 
Conference, the Publisher of The United Methodist 
Church, and the Committee on Correlation and Editorial 
Revision shall be charged with editing the Discipline. 
These editors, in the exercise of their judgment, shall 
have the authority to make changes in phraseology as 
may be necessary to harmonize legislation without 
changing its substance. The editors, in consultation 
with th Judicial Council, shall also have authority 
to delete provisions of the Discipline which have 
been ruled unconstitutional by the Judicial Coun- 
cil. Any challenge of a decision made by the Committee 
on Correlation and Editorial Revision shall be in writing. 
If the matter should go to the Judicial Council, the 
appealing party shall give notice thereof to the Commit- 
tee. Any established errata in the Discipline shall be 
forwarded by the United Methodist Publishing House 
to the Council of Bishops. 

XII. Distribution to the Desks of Membe r s 

Delegates 

After the first day, only the Daily Christian Advocate 
shall be placed on the desks of the members delegates, 
with additional copies for the first ministerial clergy and 
first lay reserve delegate from each delegation. 

XIII. Distribution of UnofScial Material 

Daily, periodic, or regular newsletters, or any spe- 
cial interest material published at General Conference 
by United Methodist boards, agencies, and related 
United Methodist groups may be distributed under the 
following conditions: 

A Two copies of each publication shall be deposited 
in the office of the Commission on the General Confer- 
ence in advance of the time of distribution. 

B. Material distributed should be used for informa- 
tion relative to matters that have been before or are 



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coming before the General Conference and not for so- 
liciting membership in an organization. 

C. Distribution shall be at least 30 feet outside^ any 
entrance door to the plenary or committee meeting 
rooms. 

D. Distribution shall be done by representatives of 
the publishing groups. Distributors shall be in the small- 
est number capable of effecting adequate distribution to 
those entering. During distribution it is the responsibil- 
ity of the distributors not to impede or interfere with the 
entrance or exit of persons or to hamper the general flow 
of pedestrian traffic. 

E. Distributors are responsible for the disposal of 
unused or unclaimed materials. 

F. Distributors violating these regulations will be 
prohibited from future distributions. 

XIV. Reports to be Mailed Before General 
Conference 

The reports, recommendations, and resolutions, re- 
quiring action by the General Conference, as well as 
petitions submitted in accordance with Discipline 608.7, 
shall first be assigned a Petition Number by the Secre- 
tary of the General Conference or the one designated as 
Petitions Secretary and then shall be printed in an Ad- 
vance Edition of the Daily Christian Advocate and moiled 
distributed to all delegates and to the first ministerial 
clergy and first lay reserve delegates at least sbcty days 
prior to the opening of the General Conference. If nec- 
essary to meet this deadline, material to delegates from 
outside the United States shall be sent by air mail. Such 
reports shall be printed in the same size and style as the 
Daily Christian Advocate and be punched for binding. 

In order to accomplish this, the finished copy of all 
such reports and recommendations shall be submitted 
to the editor of the Daily Christian Advocate at least 120 
days prior to the opening of the General Conference. 
Any such reports and recommendations not so submit- 
ted and not printed in an Advance Edition of the Daily 
Christian Advocate shall be received by the General 
Conference only upon three-fourths vote of the General 
Conference. The General Council on Finance and Ad- 
minisfration shall be exempt from this requirement to 
the extent necessary to allow inclusion of general funds 
receipts information for the first three years of the quad- 
rennium. The General Council on Finance and Admini- 
sfration will provide data including the third year of the 
quadrennium and other appropriate information to dele- 
gates prior to the convening of the General Conference. 



Rules of Order 

I. Daily Schedule 

Rule 1. Hours of Meetings 

The following shall be the daily order for the Gen- 
eral Conference, Sundays excepted: 

(1) 8:15 a.m. Choral music 

(4:2) 8:30 a.m. to 9:00 a.m. Devotional service under 
direction of the Council of Bishops 

(S3) 9:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Conference business 
committee meetings 

(34) 2:30 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Conference business or 
committee meetings 

(45) 7:30 p.m. Evening programs as planned by the 
Commission on the General Conference, Conference 
business or committee meetings 

(56) Recess may be called during any plenary ses- 
sion at a time deemed appropriate by the presiding 
bishop presiding. 

Rule 2. Order of Business 

After the devotional service, the daily sessions of the 
Conference shall be conducted as follows: 

(1) Reports of standing adminisfrative and special 
committees 

(2) Agenda and calendar items 

(3) Consent calendar (See Rule 28.5.) 

(4) Miscellaneous business 

II. Presiding OflScers 
Rule 3. Authority of the Chairperson 

(1) The bishop presiding shall be the legal chairper- 
son of the General Conference session. 

(2) The presiding bishop presiding shall decide 
points of order raised by the members delegates and 
shall rule on points of order not raised by members 
delegates, as the chair deems necessary to conform to 
these rules of order, subject in both cases to an appeal 
to the Conference by any member delegate without 
debate, except that the chairperson and the appellant, in 
the order here named, shall each have three minutes for 
a statement in support of their respective positions. A tie 
vote in the case of appeal shall sustain the chair. (See 
Rule 26.2) Any member delegate who raises a point of 
order shall cite the rule by number adjudged believed 
to have been violated. 



Organization and Rules 



101 



(3) The presiding bishop presiding shall have the 
right to recess a session of the General Conference at 
any time at the chair's discretion and to reconvene at 
such time as the chair shall announce. The presiding 
bishop presiding shall also have the right to stipulate 
that the session shall reconvene with only delegates, 
authorized personnel, and authorized guests permitted 
to attend such a session following recess. 

Rule 4. Calling the Conference to Order 

When the presiding bishop presiding stands and 
calls the Conference to order, no member shall speak, 
address the chair, or stand while the presiding bishop 

9ulllQ9. 

III. Rights and Duties Of Members 

Rule 5. Attendance and Seating Reserves 

No member delegate, unless hindered by sickness 
or other emergency situation shall be absent from the 
sessions of the Conference without permission of the 
Conference. All absences shall be reported by the chair- 
persons of the several Annual Conference delegations 
to the Committee on Credentials on a form provided for 
this purpose. A reserve delegate may be seated upon 
authority of the chairperson of the delegation who shall 
report the substitution in writing to the Committee on 
Credentials on a form provided for this purpose. Re- 
serves are chosen to be seated: 

1. by reason of being of the same order as the absent 
member; 

2. in order of their election as reserve delegates. 

If the Committee disapproves the substitution, after 
consultation with the chairperson of the delegation, it 
may report to the General Conference with its recom- 
mendation. The chairperson of the Committee on Cre- 
dentials shall make a daily written report to the 
Secretary of the General Conference, listing all changes 
of seating. (See Plan of Organization I A.4 and VIII A4.) 

Rule 6. Voting When On The Platform 

Electronic voting devices shall be available on 
the platform for deelgates making a presentation 
to the Conference. Reserves shall not be seated 
for such delegates. 

Rule €7. Directions for Securing the Floor 

A delegate desiring to speak to the Conference shall 
hold up the appropriate placard provided for that pur- 
pose. A delegate shall not move to the microphone until 
recognized by the presiding bishop presiding. Unless 
raising a point of order or parliamentary inquiry, the 
delegate shall not speak until given the floor. The pfe- 
a iding bishop presiding is requested to consider the 
various sections of the auditorium in rotation. The dele- 
gate recognized shall proceed to the nearest micro- 



phone and shall first announce her or his name and the 
name of the Annual Conference represented; which in 
turn, the presiding bishop presiding shall then an- 
nounce to the Conference. 

Rule f8. Interrupting the Speaker 

No member delegate who has the floor may be 
interrupted except for a point of order, a misrepresenta- 
tion, a parliamentary inquiry, a point of information, or 
to call attention that the time has arrived for a special 
order. 

Rule 89. Speaking More Than Once; Length of 
Speech 

No member shall speak a second time on the same 
question if any member who has not spoken desires the 
floor, no more than twice on the same subject under the 
same motion, and no longer than three minutes unless 
that time shall be extended by the conference. (See Rule 
35.2.) This three minute limit may be amended by a 
majority of the Conference at any time, and for any 
period of duration. 

A. No delegate shall speak a second time on 
the same question if any delegate who has not 
previously spoken on the question desires the 
floor. 

B. No delegate shall speeik more than twice on 
the same subject under the same motion, except 
as provided in Rule 36.3. 

C. No delegate shall speak longer than three 
minutes unless that time is extended by the Con- 
ference. (See Rule 36.3) 

D. The three-minute limit on delegate 
speeches may be amended by a majority vote of 
the Conference at any time and for any period of 
duration. 

Rule 910. Point of Order 

A delegate wishing to raise a point of order shall 
address the presiding bishop presiding and say, "I rise 
to a point of order." The presiding bishop presiding 
shall interrupt the proceeding; if a delegate is speaking, 
that one shall immediately yield the floor. The presiding 
bishop presiding shall then direct the delegate raising 
the point of order to state the point as briefly and con- 
cisely as possible, citing the rule invoked in the point of 
order but the delegate shall not presume to decide the 
question or argue the point. 

A point of order is decided by the presiding bishop 
presiding without debate unless in doubtful cases the 
chair submits the question to the body for advice or 
decision. When the presiding bishop presiding rules on 
a point, debate is closed, but the decision may be ai>- 
pealed. 



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Rule Wl. Voting Area Bar of the Conference 

Th ere shall be a voting area bar of the conference 
te shall provide for the integrity of the General Confer- 
ence. It is for delegates, pages, and others who have 
been granted access to the area for General Conference 
business. Delegates are not to distract others near them 
by engaging in unrelated business activity. 

Rule H2. Voting Procedure 

(1) Voting shall be by show of hands or by electronic 
means unless otherwise ordered by the Conference, 
provided, however, that in elections, voting may be by 
written ballot. H the vote is in doubt after a show of 
hands, the chair may order a standing vote. 

(2) When electronic voting is not in use, a standing 
count vote or vote by secret ballot may be ordered on 
call of any member delegate, supported by one-third of 
the members delegates present and voting. 

(3) If the event the electronic voting system is 
inoperable, the chairpersons of the delegations 
shidl poll their respective delegations. 

(34) Only delegates within the erea bar of the 
Conference when the vote is taken shall be entitled to 
vote. No delegate shall cast a vote in place of any other 
person delegate. 

(45) No other business shall be in order when a vote 
is being taken or when the previous question has been 
called until the process is completed, except such as 
relates to the vote itself or such business as the chair 
may deem appropriate. 

Rule 1S3. Division of Question 

Before a vote is taken, any delegate shall have the 
right to call for a division of any question, if it is subject 
to such division as the delegate indicates. If no delegate 
objects, the division shall be made; but if there is objec- 
tion, the chair shall put the question of division to vote, 
not waiting for a second. 

IV. Business Procedure 

Rule 134. Motion for Adoption of reports 

Whenever a report of a committee signed by the 
chairperson and secretary thereof shall be presented to 
the Conference for its action, it shall be deemed in 
proper order for consideration by the Conference with- 
out the formality of a motion to adopt and a second 
thereto . 

Rule 145. Required Forms for Reports, Resolution, 
Motions, Amendments 

All resolutions and committee reports shall be pre- 
pared in triplicate; and motions, including amendments, 
shall be presented in writing. (See Rules 28.2, 31.2, 33.) 



27) 



Rule 166. Alterations of Motions, Etc. 

When a motion is made and seconded or a resolu- 
tion is introduced and seconded or a committee report 
is read or is published in the Daily Christian Advocate, 
it shall be deemed to be in the possession of the Confer- 
ence and may not be altered except by action of the 
Conference. (See Rule 32.) 

Rule 1€7. Undebatable Motions 

The following motions shall be acted upon without 
debate: 

(1) To adjourn, when unqualified, except to adjourn 
the Conference finally 

(2) To suspend the rules 

(3) To lay on the table, except as provided in Rule 
36 

(4) To take fi-om the table 

(5) To call for the previous questions (See Rule 22) 

(6) To reconsider a non-debatable motion (See Rule 

(7) To limit or extend the limits of debate 

Rule 1-78. Rights of the Main Question 

The main question may be opened to debate under 
the following motions: to adopt, to commit or refer, to 
substitute, to postpone, and to reconsider. No new mo- 
tion, resolutions, or subject shall be entertained until the 
one under consideration shall have been disposed of, 
except as provided in Rule 12.5. The foregoing does not 
apply to secondary motions if otherwise allowable. 

Rule 1€9. Precedence of Secondary Motions 

If any one or more of the following motions shall be 
made when one or more other motions are pending, the 
order of their precedence in relation to one another shall 
be the same as the order of their listing below: 

(1) To fix the time to which the conference shall 
adjourn. (This motion is subject to amendment, or it may 
be laid to the table.) 

(2) To adjourn 

(3) To take a recess 

(4) To lay on the table 

(5) To order the previous question (See Rules 
22,24.) 

(6) To limit or extend the limits of debate 

(7) To postpone to a given time 



Organization and Rules 



103 



(8) To commit or refer 

(9) To amend or to amend by substitution (one 
amendment being allowed to an amendment) 

(10) To postpone indefinitely 

Rule ■i920. Motion to Adjourn in Order Except: 

The motion to adjourn, when unqualified, shall be 
taken without debate and shall always be in order, ex- 
cept: 

(1) When a delegate has the floor 

(2) When a question is actually put or a vote is being 
taken and before it is finally decided 

(3) When the previous question has been ordered 
and action thereunder is pending 

(4) When a motion to adjourn has been lost and no 
business or debate has intervened 

(5) When the motion to fix the time to which the 
conference shall adjourn is pending 

The foregoing does not apply to a motion for final 
adjournment of the Conference. 

Rule 291. Tabling Related Motions 

No motion which adheres to another motion or has 
another motion adhering to it can be laid on the table by 
itself. Such motions, if laid on the table, carry with them 
the motions to which they adhere or which adhere to 
them. 

Rule 2i2. Previous Question 

Any member who moves the previous question 
(that is, that the vote be now taken on the motion or 
motions pending) shall also indicate to what it is in- 
tended to apply, if any secondary motion or motions are 
also pending. If said member does not so indicate, it shall 
be regarded as applying only to the immediately pend- 
ing question. This motion shall be taken without debate 
and shall require a two-thirds vote of those present and 
voting for its adoption; if it is adopted, the vote shall be 
taken on the motion or motions to which it applies 
without further debate except as provided in Rule 36. 
(See also Rules 17, 24e, 25.) 

Rule 2S3. Referring Reports, Etc. 

It shall be in order for the Conference to refer to a 
committee a section or part of a report or resolution 
which is before the Conference for consideration of any 
amendment offered thereto. 

Rule 294. Procedure for Amending by Substitution 

(A) When a resolution or committee report is prop- 
erly before the Conference for consideration and action. 



even if amendments are pending, a substitute therefore 
may be offered by any member moving that the same 
be substituted for the report, resolution, or amendment 
under consideration. Th«e substitute shall be an alter- 
native to what is before the house and not simply a 
negation of the main motion. 

(B) The Conference shall theft proceed first to per- 
fect the original report or resolution, including consid- 
eration and action upon any amendments which may be 
offered to it. 

(C) The same perfecting process shall then be fol- 
lowed with respect to the substitute. 

(D) The questions shall theft be put first on the 
motion to substitute, followed by the motion to adopt the 
report or resolution ; provided, however, . 

(E) The motion for the previous questions shall not 
be in order on the adoption of the report or recommen- 
dation or on making the proposed substitution until 
opportunity has been given for at least two members to 
speak on each side of the question of substitution or 
adoption. (Also see 35.2 for handling minority reports.) 

Rule 245. Unlawful Motion After Speech 

It shall not be in order for a member delegate 
immediately after discussing a pending question and 
before relinquishing the floor to make a motion whose 
adoption which, if adopted, would limit or stop de- 
bate. 

Rule 26Q. Exceptions to Majority Vote. 

A majority of those voting, quorum being present 
(Discipline 607), shall decide all questions, with the 
following exceptions: 

(1) One-third of those present and voting shall suf- 
fice to sustain a call for a count recorded vote in case 
the decision of the chair is doubted. (See Rule 12.2.) 

(2) A tie vote sustains the chair. (Rule 3.2.) 

(3) A two-thirds vote shall be required to sustain a 
motion to suspend (Rule 38) or amend (Rule 39) the 
rules; to set aside a special order (Rule 28. 1) ; to consider 
a special order before the time set therefore; to sustain 
the request of the Committee on Courtesies and Privi- 
leges for the presentation of any person after the sbcth 
day of the General Conference. (Plan of Organization 
VIII.A.3.) 

(4) A call for the previous question is a motion to 
suspend the rules and therefore requires a two-thirds 
vote. 

(5) A two-thirds vote shall be required to approve a 
proposal for a constitutional amendment. (Discipline, 
62-64.) 



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Rule 267. Reconsideration 

A motion to reconsider an action of the Conference 
shall be in order at any time if offered by a member 
delegate who voted with the prevailing side. If the 
motion it is proposed to reconsider is non-debatable, the 
motion to reconsider may not be debated. (See Rule 16.) 

Rule 27S. Regular Calendar and Consent Calendar 

(1) The Secretary shall keep the Calendar which 
includes the orders of the day and the reports of com- 
mittees (See Rule 31) ; the matters of . ^Business placed 
on it-the calendar shall be considered as in the order 
recommended by the Committee on Agenda and Cal- 
endar, unless by two-thirds vote of the Conference, an 
item is taken up out of its order. (See Rule 26.3.) 

(2) When a committee presents a report on a given 
subject , as a part of its report it must shall also list the 
numbers of all petitions relating to this subject the 
report on which the committee voted non-concurrence 
so that all related matters may be considered at the same 
tiffle together. (See Rules 30.3, 31, 33.) 

(3) When the action of a legislative committee has 
had no more than 5 votes cast against the prevailing 
position on a calendar item, and the item has been 
previously printed in the Daily Christian Advocate and 
in the hands of the delegates for not less than 24 hours, 
the Calendar Committee shall cause the calendar num - 
bers of such items to be printed in the Daily Christian 
Advocate under the heading of Consent Calendar, cx ' 
cepting those calendar items dealing with constitutional 
amendments or having financial implications. (Sec Plan 
of OrganLzation IX and Rule 25.5.) 

( 4 ) The Consent Calendar shall be called up daily 
pursuant to Rule 2. Adoption of the Consent Calendar 
by vote of the Conference shall be deemed adoption of 
all calendar items on the Consent Calendar. However, 
any 5 delegates may have a Consent Calendar item 
removed by having such a request in the hands of the 
Secretary by 3:00 p.m. of the day the calendar item first 
appears in the Daily Christian Advocate. In such ea s e the 
item shall be removed and thereafter shall be called up 
in the regular order of business. 

(3) Action from a legislative committee shall 
be placed on the Consent Calendar if: 

(a) No more than five votes were cast against 
the prevailing position in the Committtee; 

(b) The item has been previously printed in 

The Daily Christian Advocate; 

(c) The item has been in the hands of delegates 
for at least 24 hours; and 

(d) The item is neither a constitutional amend- 
ment nor one having financial implications. 



(4) The Daily Christian Advocate shall clearly 
identify the Consent Calendar which will list items 
in three sections sub-headed as follows: 

(a) Discipline Changes — Conciurence 

(b) Non-Discipline Items — Concurrence 

(c) Discipline and Non-Discipline Items — 
Non-conctu"ence 

(5) The Consent Calendar shall be called up 
daify pursuant to Rule 2. Adoption of the Consent 
Calendar by vote of the Conference shall be 
deemed action on all calendar items on the Con- 
sent Calendar. 

(6) Any five delegates may have a Consent 
Calendar item removed by having such a request 
on file with the Secretary by 3:00 p.m. of the day 
the calendar item first appears in The Daily Chris- 
tian Advocate. Such items shall be called up in the 
regular order of business. 

Rule 289. Rules of Order of Legislative Committees 

The rules of order of the General Conference, ex- 
cept for Rule 36, shall be observed in meetings of stand- 
ing legislative committees insofar as they apply. 

Rule 5930. Duties and Prerogatives of Legislative 
Committees 

(1) Following election and orientation of officers, as 
its first order of business, each committee shall utilize 
the resources of its legislative coordinator. Each com- 
mittee shall evaluate the petitions assigned to the com- 
mittee, establish priorities, and outline the committee's 
work on the basis of those priorities unless it is given 
special instructions by the General Conference. (See 
Plan of Organization VIII. A (7) (a) .) 

(2) When a petition or resolution or any similar item 
is referred to one of the several standing legislative 
committees, it shall be understood that the whole ques- 
tion with which the paper has to do is referred to that 
committee for such action as it may deem wise. In 
addition to concurrence and non-concurrence, a com- 
mittee may recommend action or referral to the next 
General Conference or to a board, council, commission, 
or committee either for action or for report to the next 
General Conference. 

(3) Committees shall report to the Conference upon 
all matters referred to them by the Conference, directiy 
or through the Committee on Reference. Committee 
reports on resolutions, petitions, etc., shall cite the same, 
identifying them by numbers they bear respectively in 
the published reports of the Committee on Reference or 
in some other suitable manner. 

(4) When a committee ascertains that another com- 
mittee is, or in its judgment should be, considering a 



Organization and Rules 



105 



subject which the former is considering, it shall report 
the matter to the Committee on Reference for such 
adjustment as the situation may require. 

Rule 301. Legislative Committee Report to the Daily 
Christian Advocate 

(1) As quickly as material can be prepared, each 
secretary of a standing legislative committee shall pre- 
sent each of the committee's reports to a recorder as- 
signed to the committee. The recorder will key in 
prepare the report and send it to the Daily Christian 
Advocate. A copy of the report as it will appear in the 
Daily Christian Advocate will be sent to the chair and 
vice chair for their approval and signature. After copy 
has been approved, it will be returned to the Daily 
Christian Advocate. A calendar number will be assigned 
and it will be printed as approved. 

(2) Committee and minority reports which propose 
changes in the Discipline shall give chapter, section, and 
paragraph to be affected and shall be prepared in the 
following manner. 

Existing words used as reference points shall be in 
quotation marks; words to be deleted shall be single-un- 
derscored; words to be added shall be double-under- 
scored. In the publication of these reports, the Daily 
Christian Advocate shall substitute italics for single un- 
derscoring and boldface for double underscoring. (See 
Rule 33.) 

Rule 3-i2. Published Reports in Possession ofConfer- 



Reports submitted by the committee according to 
the deadline, as announced by the Secretary of the 
Conference, shall appear in the next day's Daily Chris- 
tian Advocate. The report as printed in the Daily Chris- 
tian Advocate becomes the official copy, subject only to 
grammatical or other obvious editorial changes and 
shall be regarded as in the possession of the Conference. 
On the day following its first appearance in the Daily 
Christian Advocate or any time thereafter, a report is in 
order for consideration at the pleasure of the confer- 
ence. The same rule shall apply to a report of a minority 
of any committee. (See Rules 16, 35.) 

Rule 553. Preparation and Printing of Reports 

(1) All committee reports shall be presented to the 
Daily Christian Advocate on a form provided therefore 
and using a process approved by the Secretary of the 
Conference. The form shall bear at the top the name of 
the committee, its total membership, the number pre- 
sent at the time the report was adopted, the number 
voting for and against the report, respectively, and the 
number not voting. (See Rule 15, 28.2, 30.3, 31.) 

(2) Consent Calendar items (see Rule 28.3, 4) shall 
be clearly marked with an identifying symbol on the 
report cover and in the Daily Christian Advocate print- 



ing, this symbol to be supplied by the General Confer- 
ence Secretary. 

(3) Reports of the standing legislative committees 
shall be printed in the Daily Christian Advocate at least 
one day before being presented for consideration by the 
Conferenc e, and they shall not be read unlc99 by its 
order . Committee reports to which minority reports are 
appended shall be printed in sequence, and so num- 
bered. 

(4) Every effort should be made to print consecu - 
tively all petitions, whether concurrence or non concur 
rcncc or whether on the Consent Calendar or not, which 
address the same issue. Every efifort should be made 
by the secretary of the Legislative Committee to 
report consecutively all petitions which address 
the same issue. 

Rule 3S4. Committee Chairperson Not in Harmony 
with Report 

When the chairperson of a committee is not in 
harmony with a report adopted by the committee, it shall 
be the chairperson's duty to state the fact to the commit- 
tee. The committee shall elect one of its members to 
present it in the presentation and discussion of the 
report in the Conference. If, in such a case, the commit- 
tee shall fail to select a representative, the chairperson 
shall designate a member to represent the committee, 
and said representative shall have all the rights and 
privileges of the chairperson in relation to such report 

Rule 345. Minority Report 

(1) Minority reports represented as substitutes for 
a committee report shall conform to Rule 24 and Rule 
31 respectively and indicate the specific report number 
with which it relates. The names of the members of the 
committee signing the report shall be indicated. A mi- 
nority report shall be signed by one-tenth or by ten 
members of the committee, whichever is the lesser. 

(2) A minority report shall be handled processed 
as a substitution for the report of the committee pursu- 
ant to Rule 24 as would any other substitute. 

(3) A member selected by the signers of the report 
of a minority of a committee to present the same shall 
have the same rights and privileges in relation thereto 
which belong to the chairperson in the presentation of 
the committee report. In closing debate on the minority 
report, the member presenting the minority report shall 
speak first and the chairperson last. 

Rule 366. Speakers For and Against 

(1) When the report of a committee is under consid- 
eration, it shall be the duty of the presiding bishop to 
ascertain, when recognizing a member of the Confer- 
ence, on which side the member proposes to speak; the 
chair shall not assign the floor to any member proposing 
to speak on the same side of the pending question as the 



106 



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speaker immediately preceding if any member desires 
to speak on the other side thereof. 

(2) Except for undebatable motions (Rule 17), no 
report shall be adopted or question relating to the same 
decided without opportunity having been given for at 
least two speeches for and two against the said proposal. 
After three speeches for and three against and provided 
no secondary motions come before the floor, the ques- 
tions shall be put automatically. However, the chairper- 
son and/or duly authorized member or members 
presenting the committee's report (and the minority 
report chairperson or representative if there be one) 
shall be entitled to speak before the vote is taken. (See 
Rule 35.) 

(3) The right of the chairperson and/or other mem- 
ber or members to close the debate shall prevail in like 
manner to a limit of three minutes when a vote is about 
to be taken on a motion to amend, to substitute, to 
postpone, to refer, or to lay on the table or any other 
motion whose adoption would vitally affect the report 
under consideration. (See Rules 9, 35.) 

Rule 367. Effective Date 

All legislation of the General Conference of the 
United Methodist Church shall become effective Janu- 
ary 1 following the session of the General Conference at 
which it is enacted, unless otherwise specified. (See 
Discipline ^ 609.) 

VI. Suspending, Amending, and Supplementing 

Rule 3^. Suspension of the Rules 

The operation of any of the provisionz of the Plan of 
Organization or of these Rules of Order may be sus- 
pended at any time by two-thirds vote of the Conference. 
(See Rule 26.3.) 

Rule 389. Amending Rules 

The plan of Organization and these Rules of Order 
may be amended or changed by a two-thirds vote of the 
Conference; provided the proposed change or amend- 
ment has originated in the Committee on Plan of Organi- 
zation and Rules of Order or has been presented to the 
Conference in writing and referred to this committee, 
which committee shall report thereon not later than the 
following day. (See Rule 26.3 and Plan of Organization 

vn.B.) 

The Plan of Organization and Rules of Order 
as adopted at the opening session shall be printed 
in the next Daily Christian Advocate. 



Rule S940. Robert's Rules of Order, Supplemental 

Authority 

In any parliamentary situation not covered by the 
Plan of Organization or these Rules of Order, the Gen- 
eral Conference shall be governed in its action by the 
current edition of Robert's Rules of Order. 

Rule 4&1. Persons Without Right to Make or Second 
Motion 

A person seated in the conference with the right to 
speak, but without vote, does not have the right to make 
a motion or second motions. 

Recommendation Number Two 

We propose that the Study on Ministry come before 
the General Conference using the following process: 

1. The Council of Bishops will present its Study on 
Ministry to the General Conference in plenary on 
Wednesday morning, April 17, as an order of the day. 

2. Following this presentation, the body of the Gen- 
eral Conference will be divided into 25 randomly se- 
lected non-legislative groups for reflection and dialogue 
on the study. 

3. Each group will meet for 90 minutes guided by a 
convenor Bishop selected by the Council of Bishops. 

4. Each group will be provided a recorder who is a 
non-delegate and who has been trained by UMCom. 

5. On Wednesday evening, April 17, the convenors 
and recorders will meet to compare experiences and to 
identify areas of consensus among the groups as well as 
issues or questions related to the study which were not 
addressed in the Wednesday morning presentation. 

6. The convenor and recorder will provide the Gen- 
eral Conference on Thursday morning, April 18, with a 
written report-for-information of their observations. 
The General Secretary of UMCom will present a brief 
oral summary of the report. The Bishop presenting the 
Study on Ministry report will have opportunity for addi- 
tional comments. 

7. The study will then move to the legislative com- 
mittee to which it has been assigned and follow the 
legislative process in accordance with the Plan of Or- 
ganization and Rules of Order adopted by the General 
Conference. 



DCA Advance Edition 



Church and Society 



THE GENERAL CONFERENCE OF THE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 



Volume 1 



Nashville, Tennessee 



General Board of Church and Society 



"How Do We Honor Life" 

In the middle of the second year of this 1993-1996 
quadrennium, Thorn White Wolf Fassett, general secre- 
tary of the General Board of Church and Society 
(GBCS), in an article in Christian Social Action maga- 
zine, published by the GBCS for the Church, asked the 
question, "How do we honor life?" His answer high- 
lighted the Church's directives for the work of this 
general agency: 

"I believe that the great Disciplinary mandates for 
the GBCS are designed to honor life. How often do we 
use paragraphs 1102 or 1104 [of TTte Book of Discipline, 
1992] to engage in daily meditation? It may seem odd 
that I could meditate over such Disciplinary language, 
but it is the very core of our mandate from the general 
church, directing us to help the church honor life. 

"We are to relate the gospel of Jesus Christ to 
members of the church and to the persons and struc- 
tures of the communities and world in which they live. 

"We shall bring the whole of human life, including 
all activities, possessions, and community and world 
relationships, into conformity with the will of God. 

"We shall show the members of the church and the 
society that the reconciliation which God effected 
through Christ involves personal, social and civic right- 
eousness. 

"We shall seek the implementation of the Social 
Principles and other policy statements of the General 
Conference on Christian social concerns. 

"How do we honor life? What an astonishing task! 
Why is it so difficult to understand that some of our 
family members are not clear about this powerful man- 
date for this international program board of The United 
Methodist Church? Our mandate is disturbing, revolu- 
tionary, if you will. How do we understand these power- 
ful mandates and free ourselves and free our beloved 
church to devote its faith, resources and property to the 
call of Christ to honor life?" 



These Disciplinary mandates, the GBCS General 
Secretary noted "are the very substance of the gift of the 
Holy Spirit empowering us to share God's gracious love 
as we seek the transformation of individuals and com- 
munities, of national and international relationships in 
order to honor life and heighten human dignity, love, 
justice and freedom." 

The 38 program and support staff members of the 
GBCS, working from the United Methodist Building on 
Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., and the Church Center 
for the United Nations in New York City, continued this 
quadrennium to carry out the mandates of the Discipline 
and to advocate for the Church's stances on social issues 
as articulated in the Social Principles and multiplicity of 
position statements published in the Book of Resolutions. 

As it has each preceding quadrennium, the GBCS 
again projected plans and programs to educate, assist, 
and motivate United Methodists to carry on justice min- 
istries through their own local churches, through their 
district and conference connections, through ecumeni- 
cal channels, and through coalitional efforts with other 
societal groups. 

The GBCS staff continued to analyze and interpret 
the issues confronting people in this country and 
throughout the world. During this quadrennium, it in- 
tensified its efforts to assist districts and annual confer- 
ences with needed resources, training, and support in 
work on issues. To facilitate communication and inter- 
action with annual conferences, and to respond to the 
need of United Methodists across the Church for sup- 
port services and resources, each GBCS Program Staff 
member now carries responsibility for being the pri- 
mary contact person for several annual conferences. 

Leading the work of the GBCS during the quadren- 
nium were: Bishop Joseph H. Yeakel, Washington Area, 
president; Celia Cox, North Carolina Conference, vice- 
president; Ron Koo, North Texas Conference, secretary, 
succeeded for the latter part of the quadrennium by 
Faustina H. Lucero, New Mexico Conference; and Mar- 
garet F. Knight, treasurer. The Rev. Dr. Thom White 
Wolf Fassett has served as the GBCS General Secretary 
since June 1988. 



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Speaking to the Church — and the World 

Throughout the quadrennium, the GBCS judi- 
ciously, yet vigorously, carried out its Disciplinary re- 
sponsibility to "speak to the Church, and to the world, 
its convictions, interpretations, and concerns, recogniz- 
ing the freedom and responsibility of all Christians to 
study, interpret, and act on any or all recommendations 
in keeping with their own Christian calling" {Book of 
Discipline, 1992, %, 1104). The GBCS took positions on 
a number of emerging critical issues, and the General 
Secretary issued frequent press statements dealing with 
justice issues on which The United Methodist Church 
has taken positions. During the quadrennium the GBCS 
adopted resolutions: 

• Urging a publicly financed health care system provid- 
ing universal access to comprehensive benefits. 

• Calling for welfare reform linked with job training, 
which does not punish recipients, and which will not 
reduce benefits to children and further impoverish 
poor families. 

• Expressing concern about the Cuban economic em- 
bargo and its expansion through the Cuban Democ- 
racy Act 

• Calling for relocation of the 1996 General Conference 
because Colorado's Amendment 2 (dealing with the 
civil rights of homosexuals) was "in direct conflict 
with the policy of The United Methodist Church." 

• Decrying the murder of Dr. David Gunn, a physician 
who performed abortions. 

• Calling for a 50 percent increase on alcoholic bever- 
age taxes to be used in prevention strategies, retrain- 
ing of displaced workers, and as a revenue in any new 
health care package. 

• Promoting gun collection days and urging the Na- 
tional Rifle Association to "ease its opposition to the 
passage of gun control legislation." 

• Indicating opposition to the proposed North Ameri- 
can Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), which did not 
include enforceable economic and environmental 
standards. 

• Calling on US President Clinton to negotiate and sign 
a comprehensive nuclear weapons test ban treaty. 

• Urging the Food and Drug Administration to recon- 
sider its approval of the genetically engineered bo- 
vine growth hormone to increase milk production. 

• Urging local churches observing the 25th anniver- 
sary of Earth Day to include the issues of environ- 
mental racism and classism. 



• Asking the Council of Bishops for support in devel- 
oping a mental-Ulness network. 

• Calling for prayer vigUs during elections in El Salva- 
dor and South Africa. 

• Urging continued efforts to assure a restoration of 
human rights for the people of Haiti. 

• Calling on the US Senate to ratify the Law of the Sea 
and Biodiversity treaties. 

• Supporting a US campaign to establish a peace tax 
fund for people "who conscientiously object to pay- 
ment of taxes for war." 

• Opposing California's Proposition 187 on the 
grounds that this legislation is contrary to the biblical 
admonitions about the treatment of sojourners. 

Undergirded by the Social Principles and General 
Conference resolutions, the GBCS General Secretary 
spoke "to the Church and to the world" on a wide range 
of issues through press statements advocating: 

• Support for the efforts of former Virginia Governor 
Wilder on gun control. 

• Passage of the Religious Freedom Restoration Act, 
which affirms the right of every religious group to 
exercise religious freedom. 

• Establishment of fuU diplomatic and trade relations 
with Angola. 

• An end to the 30-year embargo of Cuba and a return 
to normal diplomatic relations. 

• International efforts to assure democratic rights for 
the people of Haiti, "but a military invasion is not the 
answer." 

• That the President and the US Congress not abandon 
the needs of the people in Somalia. 

• Establishment of a National Day of Reconciliation to 
"enable all of us to reaffirm the sacredness of human 
life and to resolve that guns and gim violence must 
be rejected by all people as a means of problem 
solving." 

• Defeat by Congress of the proposed balanced budget 
amendment 

• Increased protection for Haitian refugees seeking 
asylum in the United States. 

• Support for the Employment Non-discrimination Act 
of 1994 to prohibit work-place discrimination based 
on sexual orientation. 

• Strong opposition to legislation calling for a state- 
sponsored school prayer constitutional amendment 



Church and Society 



109 



• Defeat of the "Citizens Protection from Violent Crime 
Act of 1995," which included a repeal of the assault 
weapons ban. 

• Presidential and congressional control of the CIA, 
which "has no right to interfere in the internal affairs 
of foreign nations" (e.g., Guatemala). 

• Opposition to legislation that would weaken existing 
affirmative action programs or laws. 

Research, Education and Advocacy 

The ability of the GBCS and its staff to speak to the 
Church and the world is undergirded by its work on the 
issue development mandate-to "conduct a program of 
research, education, and advocacy/action on the wide 
range of issues confronting the Church consistent with 
the Social Principles and the policies adopted by Gen- 
eral Conference" (1992 Book of Discipline, ^ 1104). 

The GBCS and its staff continued during this quad- 
rennium to fine-tune the new organizational design 
adopted during the previous quadrennium. Staff mem- 
bers continued their work within the three ministry 
areas: 0) the Ministry of God's Creation, (2) the Minis- 
try of God's Human Community, and (3) the Ministry of 
Resourcing Congregational Life. In addition, staff with 
offices in the Church Center for the United Nations 
carried on, in cooperation with the Women's Division of 
the Board of Global Ministries, the United Methodist 
United Nations ministry. 

Board members in six work areas guided the work 
of the staff in the ministry areas. Those work areas 
continued as: Peace with Justice, Environmental Justice, 
Alcohol and Other Drugs, Human Welfare, Communi- 
cations, and Resourcing Congregational life. 

Furthermore, board members in 11 administrative 
committees continued to care for these aspects of the 
GBCS organizational life: Biblical and Theological Inter- 
pretation; Bylaws/Legislation; Confronting Classism, 
Racism, Ageism, Sexism, Handicappism (CCRASH); 
Ethnic Local Church Funding; Hispanic Ministry; Hu- 
man Relations Day; Evaluation and Review; Executive 
Committee; Finance; Nominations; Trustees. 

The GBCS continues to carry out the bulk of its 
issue work through the Ministry of God's Creation and 
the Ministry of God's Human Community. However, 
during this quadrennium the Communications Work 
Area carried on research, education, and action on the 
issues of media literacy and violence in the media. Fur- 
thermore, near the end of the quadrennium, Resourcing 
Congregational Life also became involved in work on 
several issues. 



Ministry of God's Creation 
Peace with Justice 



The Peace with Justice Program has kept peace and 
justice ministries before the Church, particularly focus- 
ing on issues of de-militarization, national budget priori- 
ties, foreign aid, human rights, and economic justice. By 
the end of the quadrennium, the GBCS Peace with 
Justice Program will have expended approximately 
$2,039,083 (unaudited estimate), including the monies 
from the annual Peace with Justice Special Sunday offer- 
ing, which supports the program, and certain World 
Service contingency funds. 

Peace with Justice staff continued to work closely 
with United Methodist Communications to provide re- 
sources for local churches to celebrate Peace with 
Justice Sunday. Some of the funds received by the 
GBCS through the offering are granted to peace and 
justice programs around the world to assist in education, 
advocacy, and mission-related efforts. The GBCS advo- 
cates continuation of Peace with Justice as a special 
program of the church in the next quadrennium. 

Working to support and strengthen peace and jus- 
tice ministries in local churches and annual confer- 
ences, the GBCS organized and coordinated a variety of 
Peace with Justice involvements: 

Peace with Justice Coordinators in every annual 
conference served as primary GBCS contact persons 
and received regular resources and communications 
from the Peace with Justice Program office. 

Peace with Justice Educators, GBGM mission- 
aries on home assignment for sbc-months to two-year 
periods, worked through the GBCS in annual confer- 
ences as resource persons interpreting the Peace with 
Justice Program. In this quadrennium, eight educators 
worked with five annual conferences to strengthen and 
promote peace and justice ministries in local churches 
and districts through the direction of the annual confer- 
ences. 

Peace Advocates, initially resourced by both the 
GBCS and the General Board of Discipleship (GBOD), 
are now solely related to the GBCS, due to GBOD 
restructuring. They are dedicated persons who volun- 
teer their time in their local churches, communities, 
districts, and annual conferences to keep peace and 
justice ministries at the forefront. 

The Peace with Justice Network, made up of the 
people mentioned above and other interested United 
Methodists, continued to grow. Network members re- 
ceive the quarterly Peace with Justice Newsletter. A 

number of persons in the Network participated in the 
Peace with Justice-hosted "Rivers in the Desert," a week- 
end retreat-type event providing workshops and plenar- 
ies on a variety of social justice/peace-making topics. 



110 



DCA Advance Edition 



In the international arena, the GBCS Peace with 
Justice involvements included a visit to Cuba to demon- 
strate solidarity with the Cuban Methodist Church; the 
visit generated further advocacy with Congress and the 
Administration urging an end to the US 35-year-old 
embargo. Through coalitional efforts, Peace with Justice 
staff worked to end the military junta and called upon 
the United Nations and all governments to seek a solu- 
tion and help establish democracy and social justice for 
the people of Haiti. 

Peace with Justice also supported the peace proc- 
esses of Nicaragua and El Salvador through visiting, 
monitoring the Salvadoran elections, and calling on the 
World Bank to ease the debt burden on poor countries. 
In addition, the Peace with Justice Program initiated 
letters, statements, and press conferences to express 
concern and issue calls for justice for the people of 
Mexico, the Middle East, Guatemala, and other coun- 
tries in Central and Latin America. 

The GBCS joined the "50 Years Is Enough Cam- 
paign," a national effort of religious and secular organi- 
zations working for major reforms of the World Bank 
and International Monetary Fund. 

On issues related to Africa, staff participated in 
legislative efforts on foreign aid reform, which stressed 
poverty reduction, alleviation of hunger, and sustainable 
development as key US foreign aid priorities. With the 
changes in Congress, including increased opposition to 
foreign aid assistance to African countries, the GBCS 
strengthened its Africa public policy work. In these 
efforts, the GBCS has worked to coordinate its advocacy 
work with the GBGM Africa office, the Women's Divi- 
sion and UMCOR Washington offices, the Washington 
Office on Africa, and Bread for the World. Staff moni- 
tored White House and Congressional response to the 
fragic situation in Rwanda, helped organize African 
Americans for Aid to Africa, worked with the Forum of 
African Voluntary Development Organization, and 
worked with African NGO's at the United Nations World 
Summit for Social Development. 

Throughout the quadrennium, staff persons in the 
Ministry of God's Creation also worked on a variety of 
other economic justice issues, including: 

• Empowerment zones and enterprise communi- 
ties in lu-ban and rural areas — Staff supported 
legislation to create such areas; supported ef- 
forts to stop the weakening of the Commxmity 
Reinvestment Act, key legislation that protects 
low-income and communities of color against 
redlining; participated in efforts to stop insur- 
ance and telecommxmications redlining. 

• Urban redevelopment — Staff advocated poli- 
cies addressing the crises facing US cities, in- 
cluding job creation and training, community 
banks and other financial institutions, neigh- 



borhood enterprise development; worked with 
the United Methodist National Urban Strategy 
Coimcil; attended the World Summit for Social 
Development. 

• Trade and labor — Staff advocated for policies 
that protect the rights of workers, including the 
California table grape boycott, workplace fair- 
ness efforts, and OSHA reform; worked to ob- 
tain adequate environmental and economic 
provisions in NAFTA and to Congress and the 
administration for inclusion of the latest envi- 
ronmental standards as key to any trade agree- 
ment. 

• Gambling — Staff worked to provide resoiu"ces 
and support to United Methodists across tibe 
nation acting to oppose the spread of legalized 
gambling; initiated the project "Enough Is 
Enough: Churches and Communities Working 
Together to Stop Gambhng," and hired United 
Methodist anti-gemibling activist Tom Grey as a 
consultant to help annual conferences and con- 
gregations organize against gambling; partici- 
pated in the work of the National CoaUtion 
Against Legalized Gambling; consulted in the 
production of a special issue of Christian Social 
Action on gambling, which became a vridely-used 
resource for anti-gambling education and action. 

Environmental Justice 

The Environmental Justice Work Area, in its efforts 
to implement the statements of the Social Principles and 
General Conference resolutions, sought to promote en- 
vironmental justice and the survival of all parts of God's 
creation. It saw annual conferences as the primary vehi- 
cle "with whom we will establish ministries of environ- 
mental justice," and it also worked through coalitions on 
issue development and advocacy. Its four-year expendi- 
tures will total approximately $1,098,083 (unaudited es- 
timate). The work area's program included these foci: 

Designing and implementing "Abimdant liv- 
ing: How Much Is Enough?" To raise awareness of 
abundant living, staff of the Ministry of God's Creation 
helped to draft an abundant living resolution; partici- 
pated in National Religious Partnership for the Environ- 
ment consultations on consumption; initiated a process 
for developing dialog groups hosted by annual confer- 
ence environmental justice coordinators; and held a 
fraining event for environmental coordinators. Staff also 
met with staff members from United, Illiff, and Clare- 
mont seminaries to discuss the issue. 

Responding to commimities facing environ- 
mental degradation with special attention to peo- 
ple of color/poor and Third World communities. 

As part of its work on the issue of environmental racism, 
the GBCS sponsored a 1995 Hispanic environmental 
fraining event in Phoenix, Arizona, and it hosted an 



Church and Society 



111 



Hispanic intern for 10 months to work on environmental 
justice issues. The staff highlighted the issue in its 
newsletter, developed and distributed in the summer of 
1994 an environmental racism packet, and led a work- 
shop on environmental racism during a meeting of en- 
vironmental justice coordinators. 

Advocating for a moratorium on the siting of hazard- 
ous waste treatment, storage, and disposal facilities in 
low-income/people of color communities, staff worked 
for passage of the Environmental Equal Rights Act 
(EERA), for inclusion of environmental racism consid- 
erations in the Clean Water Act and the Superfund, and 
on the Safe Drinking Water Act. In addition, staff worked 
with the World Council of Churches on environmental 
racism aspects of climate change, with Rep. Cardiss 
Collins' staff to help redraft the EERA and with the 
Gwich'in Steering Committee to protect the Arctic Na- 
tional Wildlife Refuge. 

Staff also co-sponsored hearings on toxic waste 
problems, wrote articles on the subject for various pub- 
lications, and developed a bibliography of national and 
global racism issues. Furthermore, staff was particularly 
involved in bringing social activists and energy conser- 
vation activists together for joint strategy discussions. 

To monitor toxic and solid waste issues, staff 
worked with other environmental and religious groups 
such as the Interfaith Center for Corporate Responsibil- 
ity (ICCR). Staff worked with ICCRto develop strategies 
with companies on ozone issues and climate change. 

During this quadrennium, the Ministry of God's 
Creation was asked to assist the National Council of 
Churches (NCC) and the World Council of Churches 
(WCC) in their work on climate change. The ministry 
staff participated in drafting a major study of the issue 
for the WCC, hosted several meetings on climate 
change for the NCC, represented the GBCS at interna- 
tional conferences, met with members of Congress and 
the administration, and coordinated its work on the 
issue with United Methodist churches in the United 
States, Europe, and the Philippines, and the Methodist 
Church of Brazil. 

Working with annu£il conferences to carry out 
environmental justice ministries. To help establish 
environmental justice goals in annual conferences, staff 
surveyed all the conferences and then began to provide 
models for planning — in each issue of the newsletter, 
through its work with the NCC to produce an "Earth Day 
95" packet, and through publication of a resource on the 
environment, "Hope for the Earth." It continued its work 
on developing a network of resourcing between the 
GBCS and the conferences. It completed on-site visits to 
a dozen annual conferences to equip activists there to 
do environmental action locally. It utilized staff of United 
Methodist Seminars to provide assistance in developing 
eco-justice seminars. It encouraged the ministry of pres- 
ence of bishops who are in environmentally threatened 



areas; GBCS member Bishop Kenneth Carder organ- 
ized an Appalachia trip, attended by 12 bishops. 

Following up on the Genetic Science Report. 

The Ministry of God's Creation continued to follow up 
on the work of the Genetic Science Task Force, despite 
limited funds. Staff coordinated in 1994-95 the statement 
of some 200 religious leaders against animal/human 
gene patenting. The statement was covered by every 
major US and European newspaper and many in Latin 
America and Asia, as well as most major radio and 
television oudets. Staff continued to meet with govern- 
ment, industry, and academic groups on issues related 
to the United Methodist resolution on genetic science. 
The staff also continued working with the Biotechnol- 
ogy Working Group, monitored legislation in Congress, 
and assisted in developing a GBCS-adopted statement 
against human cloning. 

Continuing work on U.S. Agriculture and Ru- 
ral Communities in Crisis. Staff cooperated with 
groups such as the Federation of Southern Coopera- 
tives, the Rural Coalition, the National Family Farm 
Coalition, Office of Town and Country Ministries of the 
GBGM, and the United Methodist Rural Fellowship. In 
efforts to encourage public policies that support family 
farmers and preserve and expand the land base of mi- 
nority persons, staff attended various meetings dealing 
with the issue, worked on legislation to include minori- 
ties on county committees that administer farm pro- 
grams, and continued to work with the Rural Coalition 
on issues related to minority farmers. Staff is also follow- 
ing developments in NAFTA concerning agricultural 
and environmental policies. 

Staff also worked on the 1995 Farm Bill, the legisla- 
tive vehicle for most federal farm commodity, domestic 
food, and food export programs. On this effort it cooper- 
ated with the Campaign for Sustainable Agriculture, a 
network of diverse groups seeking to change federal 
policy to foster a sustainable farm and food system. 
Furthermore, staff set priorities of supporting family 
farms, improving the status of minority farmers, advanc- 
ing rural development through marketing cooperatives 
and government partnership with community-based or- 
ganizations, and enhancing conservation programs; it 
also participated in the work of the Racism in Rural 
Areas Task Force. 

Assisting United Methodists to respond to 
other significant environmental issues. Staff contin- 
ued to work to educate and develop grass roots advo- 
cacy for the Endangered Species Act and the Clean 
Water Act — through workshops, publications, "action 
alerts," involvements with coalitions working on the 
issues, such as the Endangered Species Coalition and 
the Clean Water Coalition. It also worked on anti-regu- 
latory issues as they affect the environment-such as 
unfunded mandates, takings, cost-benefit and risk as- 
sessments. 



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Ministry of God's Human Community 
Alcohol and Other Drugs 

During these four years, the Drug and Alcohol 
Work Area carried out a program based on a mission 
statement that says, in part: The misuse of drugs (alcohol, 
tobacco, controlled substances and other mind-altering 
substances) is injurious to personal health, hinders inter- 
personal relationships, and tears at the fabric of commu- 
nity life. This physical and social problem is ultimately a 
spiritual challenge. The work area on Alcohol and Other 
Drugs will assist the Church in deepening its under- 
standing of the problem, raising its voice of advocacy, and 
using its resources to bring healing to those afflicted. 

By the end of these four years, this work area will 
have expended approximately $1,016,530 (unaudited 
estimate) to fulfill its mission. This amount includes 
both World Service and World Service Contingency 
Fund monies. (In addition, the other work areas also 
deal with alcohol and other drugs issues.) The work area 
staffs 1993-1996 assistance to the Church included: 

Developing materials and resources for equip- 
ping local congregations in combatting the use of 
alcohol and other drugs. Among these resources 
were "Drug and Alcohol Resource Notebooks" for all 
annual conference libraries; articles in various United 
Methodist publications; staff service as a leader/trainer 
on the use of Pan Methodist curriculum; a brochure 
lifting up the Special Program on Substance Abuse and 
Related Violence (SPSARV); staff participation in the 
development of 'The Things that Make for Peace," a 
booklet dealing with gangs and gang violence. 

Coordinating inter-agency activities on the is- 
sues associated with drug and alcohol abuse. Jer- 
ald Scott, who has served as a half-time GBCS staff 
member, staffed the day-to-day work of the SPSARV for 
the General Board of Global Ministries. In her SPSARV 
work she reviewed applications for funding in excess of 
$300,000 for local, district, and annual conferences. She 
also served as keynote speaker, trainer, and workshop 
leader for local church, district, and annual conference 
events. 

Working for the banning of all alcoholic bever- 
£iges from public advertising. Staff continued work 
on legislation dealing with labeling of alcoholic bever- 
ages; reprioritized the work when the Sensible Advertis- 
ing and Family Education Act by Senator Strom 
Thurmond was withdrawn; served as a workshop leader 
for the Global Alliance dealing with alcohol policy and 
advocacy in London, England; and participated in train- 
ing of annual conference and local church persons to 
combat alcohol advertising at state and community lev- 
els. 



Carrying on cooperative work in support of the 
CouncU of Bishops' initiative on drugs and drug 
violence and assisting in the development of mod- 
els for local church use. Staff developed workshops 
for constituents planning to set up "Saving Station" min- 
istries; utilized the Covenant Pastors network as a 
speakers bureau for training events; worked with the 
United Methodist Church of Northern Europe (Scandi- 
navia) to plan, develop, and resource the sixth Bishops' 
Initiative on Drugs and Drug Violence seminar in Stock- 
holm, Sweden, in October 1994; offered technical assis- 
tance for the seventh Drug and Drug Violence seminar 
in Tallin, Estonia, October 1995, and St. Petersburg, 
Russia, March 1996. 

Creating a United Methodist coalition of cre- 
dentialed drug and alcohol professionals. Staff 
trained more than 150 conference leaders, clergy, and 
lay persons through Substance Abuse Mission Strategy 
Training Seminars at Wesley Seminary in Washington, 
D.C. and at the Gulfside Assembly in Waveland, Missis- 
sippi; staff also compiled a resource directory of some 
400 United Methodist professionals engaged in preven- 
tion, intervention, education, and treatment 

Providing guidance to assist aimual confer- 
ences to develop standing committees on alcohol 
and other drugs. Staff maintained an updated list of 
annual conference committee members and sent mail- 
ings and action alerts to standing committee chairper- 
sons to assist in carrying out legislative strategies of the 
Drug and Alcohol Concerns Work Area. 

Humem Welfare 



The Human Welfare Work Area during this quad- 
rennium focused its strategies in four broad issue areas: 
0) justice (or human rights), (2) community (or family 
and household, (3) right relationships (or administra- 
tion of justice), and (4) shalom (or right to wellness). By 
the end of the quadrennium the Human Welfare total 
expenditures will be approximately $1,608,187 (un- 
audited estimate). 

Community (or Family and Households) 

Focusing on "community," staff in the Ministry of 
God's Human Community worked for: 

Policies and programs to address the needs of 
families and households. Staff acted in opposition to 
the House appropriations bill, which would have se- 
verely cut Head-start, utilities supplement for poor peo- 
ple, the WIC programs, and public education funds; 
advocated for welfare reform legislation that protects 
the integrity of families, provides adequate services, and 
is child friendly; resourced bishops, annual confer- 
ences, and other United Methodist constituents on wel- 



Church and Society 



113 



fare reform and strategies for advocacy; and worked 
with the Interagency Task Force on Children, Youth and 
Families. In 1995 a 12-member GBCS delegation partici- 
pated in the Fourth World Conference on Women and 
the related Non-Governmental Organization event in 
China. 

Policies and programs to address the needs of 
children and youth around the world. Staff contin- 
ued to seek US support of UNICEF and UNDP pro- 
grams; worked with UNICEF and the World Health 
Organization on infant formula, child health, and baby- 
friendly hospitals; provided United Methodist congrega- 
tions with educational materials on issues affecting 
children, including resources for the Children's Sabbath 
Program; resourced the Council of Bishops Special 
Committee on Children, Youth, and Families and sup- 
ported a special initiative on Children, Youth, and Pov- 
erty; supported a ban on cigarette smoking commercials 
targeted towards children; resourced the GBCS semi- 
nar program on children's issues; joined and worked 
with the Child Labor Coalition in support of the "Rug- 
mark" campaign to protect children from abusive labor 
practices in the worldwide carpet industry. Staff also 
continued to expand the Youth Offenders Program, 
supported by funds from the annual Human Relations 
Day offering. 

Policies and programs to meet particular 
needs of the elderly. Staff participated in the work of 
the Older Adult Ministries Committee; worked for ac- 
cess to national health care, including long-term care, 
and for the preservation of Medicaid and Medicare, with 
appropriate federal funding and oversight; advocated for 
federal programs and expenditures on behalf of the 
elderly; participated in the White House Conference on 
Aging. 

Access to afiFordable, decent, safe, and sani- 
tary housing. Staff participated in ecumenical efforts to 
secure legislation supporting affordable housing; moni- 
tored the federal budget and appropriations for funding 
of housing programs; resourced annual conferences 
and various constituents on the issue. 



Right Relationships 
(or Administration of Justice) 

Staff carried out programs of research, education, 
and advocacy that involved them in: 

Working for the elimination of all forms of 
violence. Staff worked in coalitional efforts that helped 
to assure passage of the Violence Against Women Act 
of 1994, the Violent Crime Confrol Act of 1994, the Brady 
Gun Control Bill, and the Assault Weapons Ban. Staff 
also continued support of the Youth Offender Rehabili- 
tation Projects and worked in several conferences on 
efforts to serve more youth; co-sponsored a press con- 
ference in support of maintaining the Assault Weapons 



Ban; initiated a new anti-death penalty educational pro- 
ject in conjunction with the National Coalition to Abolish 
the Death Penalty and acted against the death penalty 
in other ways; set up successful prototypes for gun 
turn-in at local church "redemption centers" in annual 
conferences. 

Developing opportunities for programs and re- 
sources affirming the gift of hiunan sexuality. Staff 
advocated actions by the White House and the US Con- 
gress to protect the civil and human rights of all persons, 
particularly those of gay men and lesbians; helped to 
craft, endorsed, and supported the infroduction of the 
Employment Discrimination Act to prohibit discrimina- 
tion in the work force because of sexual orientation; 
developed and presented a workshop on the church's 
position on homosexuality and promoted the church's 
study on the issue; continued liaison work with Affirma- 
tion and the Reconciling Congregation Program and 
initiated communication with the Transforming Congre- 
gation Program; resourced constituents with materials 
on the church's position on human sexuality. 

Shalom (or Right to Wellness) 

Working for health and wholeness for all 
through access to health care. Staff of the Ministry 
of God's Human Community engaged in a multiplicity 
of sfrategies, including: 

• Continued work on global health issues in coordina- 
tion mth the GBGM's Health and Welfare Minisfries 
and United Methodist Women; participation in inter- 
national gatherings; dissemination of information to 
annual conferences and congregations; monitoring 
and confronting infant formula producers; jointly 
sponsoring (with the Ministry of God's Creation) an 
exhibit of art by Russian children exposed to radia- 
tion during the Chernobyl disaster. 

• Efforts to pass legislation to provide universal access 
to affordable health care; meetings with members of 
Congress and the adminisfration; participation and 
leadership in various health care coalitions; provision 
of on-going staff and financial support to the Interre- 
ligious Health Care Access Campaign (IHCAC); 
analysis of health care reform legislation in relation 
to United Methodist positions and IHCAC's 'Twelve 
Working Principles"; development and promotion of 
an annual Health Care Sabbath; mailings to constitu- 
ents on health care reform; addresses to annual con- 
ference events; seminars in each jurisdiction; 
coordination of daily prayer and worship service, 
focused on health and wholeness, in the United 
Methodist Building; monitoring health care activity 
in key states and working with United Methodist 
health care advocates on strategies to increase access 
to quality health care. 



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• Work with the Religious Coalition for Abortion 
Rights, support for its reorganization, new name (Re- 
ligious Coalition for Reproductive Choice), and move 
to larger space outside of the United Methodist Build- 
ing; speaking out against related violence. 

• Advocacy for legal protections for persons with pro- 
longed mental illness; financial and staff-time support 
for the on-going work of Pathways to Promise, which 
provides education on mental illness; support for the 
National Depression Awareness Campaign; work 
with various national organizations to publicize is- 
sues of mental illness; production of a Mental Illness 
Packet for Coordinators of Mental Illness Ministry, 
advocated for each annual conference as the founda- 
tion of a United Methodist Mental Illness Network; 
preparation of articles for United Methodist and men- 
tal health journals; addresses in several annual con- 
ferences to promote the Mental Illness Network. 

• Work with the AIDS National Interfaith Network to 
resource United Methodists for advocacy on issues 
relating to AIDS both nationally and internationally; 
advocacy on AIDS-related issues of housing, immi- 
gration, medical research, Medicaid, funding; pro- 
duction of an AIDS Packet in response to inquiries 
from constituents; presentation of two AIDS-related 
exhibits in the United Methodist Building lobby; pro- 
duction of AIDS worship services for publication in 
Christian Social Action. 

• Staff gave addresses on health and wholeness at 
more than 40 events across the nation and provided 
a variety of resources to constituents. 

Providing special attention to domestic and 
intemational population issues, staff represented 
the GBCS at the UN Intemational Conference on Popu- 
lation and Development in Cairo, Egypt; wrote articles 
on the conference; spoke to United Methodist gather- 
ings on the issues of population; also spoke at the 1994 
World Population Day celebration at the US Capitol; 
monitored the federal budget on population issues and 
advocated for reversal of US foreign policy restrictions 
against funding population programs globally. 

Working for policies and programs to address 
issues of medical ethics, including euthanasia, staff 
continued to work with the Park Ridge Center, writing 
materials on issues of medical ethics; worked with an- 
nual conferences studying the resolution, "Under- 
standing Living and Dying as Faithful Christians"; 
helped seminaries prepare summer sessions on the 
Church's public policy stands on issues of medical eth- 
ics. 



Ministry of Resourcing 
Congregational Life 

Resourcing Congregational Life 

The GBCS continued during this quadrennium to 
carry out its mandate to motivate, train, organize, and 
build networks for action, working with annual confer- 
ences, districts, and local churches. The unit on Resour- 
cing Congregational Life (RCL) served as the 
coordination point for the GBCS church relationships. 
As one of the quadrennial goals for this unit stated, it 
sought to facilitate the GBCS efforts "to resource the 
constituency of The United Methodist Church through 
annual conferences and districts to maximize social in- 
volvement, social change, and effective social justice 
strategies." By the end of the quadrennium, RCL will 
have expended about $2,887,459 (unaudited estimate), 
including Ethnic Local Church and Hispanic Ministry 
funds. In these four years, the RCL staff worked to: 

Develop linkages with annual conferences and 
districts to enable and strengthen their witness 
and action for social justice. Staff created and distrib- 
uted materials offering action ideas, strategies, models 
of social ministry; continued on-site visitations with an- 
nual conference Boards of Church and Society to listen 
to issue concerns and assist in training and organizing; 
led a regional training event; coordinated staff visits to 
annual conferences and districts. 

Cultivate relationships within The United 
Methodist Church and the interreligious commu- 
nity. Staff participated in the work of the Curriculum 
Resources Committee of the General Board of Disci- 
pleship; continued involvement with seminaries and 
other pastoral institutions of higher learning to keep 
before them the need for social justice awareness and 
involvement as an essential part of clergy training; 
worked with interreligious bodies on social justice. 

Assist in resourcing ethnic local churches to 
develop leaders and ministries in social justice 
within their churches and communities. This be- 
came an area of intense work for the RCL unit during 
the quadrennium as staff continued to carry out relation- 
ships with ethnic caucuses, participated in training of 
ethnic persons on social justice themes, advocated so- 
cial concerns issues related to ethnic local churches, 
and coordinated the functions and work of the Ethnic 
Local Church Grant Committee as well as the GBCS 
work on the Hispanic Ministry Plan. 

• The Ethnic Local Church Grants Committee contin- 
ued to allocate monies received to programs that 
benefit individuals, congregations, and communities. 
For example, the committee granted $5,000 to a local 
church drug prevention program for high-risk youth 
in North Georgia, $10,000 for an Illinois project pro- 
viding pesticide education for migrant workers, and 



Church and Society 



115 



$18,200 to the Native American International Caucus 
for an internship program (which brought the first 
intern to the GBCS the first half of 1995). 

• Coordinated by RCL, the GBCS staff developed a 
number of programs and resources for the National 
Hispanic Ministry Plan. Among them were: an His- 
panic environmental justice training event in which 
participants developed strategies to deal with hazard- 
ous waste endangering the health of their communi- 
ties; a training workshop on drugs and drug violence 
to enable Hispanic United Methodists to confront the 
issues in their areas; a justice for farmworkers train- 
ing workshop; three conflict resolution training work- 
shops; a healthcare policy training event; a seminar 
program on peace with justice to train lay missioners 
and pastors who wall then repeat the seminar in their 
home areas; sbc Spanish-language booklets interpret- 
ing the Social Principles for use by lay missioners as 
they conduct studies of this foundational United 
Methodist document. 

Provide an on-going educational/training pos- 
sibility for local churches, districts, and annual 
conferences and other groups through the United 
Methodist Seminars on National and International 
AfEairs. Throughout the quadrennium, this program, in 
which the Women's Division of the GBGM cooperates 
to provide seminars at the Church Center for the UN, 
again helped several thousand participants in well over 
100 groups become better educated on a wide range of 
issues, such as racism, violence, sexuality, homeless- 
ness, or Eastern Europe. Two seminar designers on the 
RCL staff guided the work of this program that has 
served United Methodists since 1974. 

The seminar staff worked to ensure ethnic and 
gender diversity among participants and resource per- 
sons, and designed seminars related to the Ethnic Local 
Church program. Staff also developed a two-year series 
of Substance Abuse Mission Strategy Training Semi- 
nars designed for United Methodists and others con- 
cerned about substance abuse and related violence in 
their communities. 

Communications 



Emphasizing its overarching concern to promote 
the understanding that justice ministries are an integral 
part of the gospel of Jesus Christ, the GBCS Communi- 
cations unit continued this quadrennium to publish, 
publicize, promote, interpret, and act on communica- 
tions issues. Over these four years. Communications 
will have expended approximately $1,798,859 (un- 
audited estimated) on Communications functions. 
Christian Social Action magazine, and production of 
resources. The unit's work was clustered in four action 



Providing resources that inform, educate, and 
motivate United Methodists so that they become 
involved in Christian social action ministries in 
their communities, the nation, and the world. 

Eleven times each year, staff published and distributed 
to subscribers the magazine Christian Social Action, 
with the newsletter "Word from Washington" as an 
eight-page insert. In addition, staff produced: the 20- 
booklet series "Faithful Witness on Today's Issues," 
which highlights General Conference resolutions; the 
Social Principles in booklet format (in English, Spanish, 
and Korean) and supplementary materials assisting 
study of the Social Principles; the annual congressional 
directory "Register Citizen Opinion"; and various other 
educational issue-oriented materials. 

Creating a greater awareness and positive im- 
age of the General Board of Church and Society 
and seeking to increase usage of the GBCS re- 
sources. Staff worked closely with the staffs of the 
Interpreter and United Methodist News Service to ob- 
tain articles and news coverage, developed interpretive 
materials about the GBCS, and carried on, in coopera- 
tion with other GBCS units, annual promotional efforts 
with annual conferences, districts, and local churches 
(through the late-August UN Day mailing) . 

Developing resources to assist United Meth- 
odists in identifying, evaluating and taking action 
in response to values commtuiicated by the me- 
dia. Staff wrote or coordinated articles on issues of 
media literacy for publication in Interpreter, Christian 
Social Action, and "Word from Washington"; utilized 
and promoted the materials of the Center for Media 
Literacy; tracked, analyzed, and interpreted to constitu- 
ency legislation dealing with media issues; developed, 
in cooperation with UMCom, a resolution on "Violence 
in Electronic Media and Film" for submission to the 
1996 General Conference; and worked with the NCC 
and secular organizations dealing with media issues. 

Facilitating more effective two-way conununi- 
cation that will strengthen the network of United 
Methodists involved in Christian social action and 
using electronic resources to inform, educate, and 
motivate. Staff worked with GBGM video production 
personnel to produce a new cooperative video highlight- 
ing local churches involved in justice ministries; contin- 
ued to promote and distribute the Social Principles 
videos, "More Than Words" (for adults) and 'The Re- 
treat" (for confirmation-age youth); assisted the GBCS 
in research and planning for use of available electronic 
networks; began to place GBCS materials on Ecunet; in 
1995 began to utilize the Internet. 

United Nations and Chapel Ministry 

During this quadrennium, the GBCS continued its 
United Nations ministry, begun in 1953 and expanded 
in 1960 when the General Conference mandated a joint 



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office in cooperation with the Women's Division; the two 
agencies then worked together to build the Church 
Center for the United Nations at 777 UN Plaza. Total 
expenditures for the GBCS four-year UN ministry at the 
quadrennium's end will be approximately $1,200,363 
(unaudited estimate) . The Church Center chapel, site of 
several thousand religious services during the quadren- 
nium, continued to provide a sanctuary used by people 
of various faiths. 

Staff continued to train local church members, 
either at the site of the UN in New York City or in annual 
conference experiences, to "think globally-act locally." 
Annually it developed materials for the all-church mail- 
ing with resources for UN Sunday and for UNICEF Day. 
At the United Nations, the GBCS staff promoted the 
General Conference positions on international con- 
cerns, human rights, justice and equity, and peace. (It 
was not unusual for world leaders at the United Nations 
to make note of the work done at the Church Center that 
helps to facilitate the successes of the international 
body.) 

A significant portion of the work of the UN ministry 
during this quadrennium focused on the series of inter- 
national conferences planned and held under UN aus- 
pices-International Conference on Environment and 
Development (Earth Summit), World Conference on 
Human Rights, International Conference on Population 
and Development, World Summit on Social Develop- 
ment, and the Fourth World Conference on Women. 

For each conference, the UN ministry provided 
research, education, advocacy, and access to the confer- 
ences. In cooperation with the Women's Division, it 
provided the framework and location for the Non-gov- 
ernmental Organization hospitality center. This facility 
offered unique opportunities for NGO's to network, dis- 
cover and use resources, and meet wi± UN governmen- 
tal officials and other representatives of NGO 
organizations from around the world. 

The unfilled aspirations for justice increase the ne- 
cessity for and demand on this United Methodist office 
at the United Nations. During the quadrennium, resur- 
gent racial, ethnic, religious, and national violence con- 
tinued to grow throughout the world; The United 
Methodist Church brought a long history of anti-xeno- 
phobia and demands for racial justice into that turbu- 
lence, and will continue to do so. A recent report of the 
Independent Working Group on the Future of the 
United Nations offered a shared vision supported by the 
presence of the GBCS UN ministry. With the United 
Nations during this quadrennium, the GBCS continued 
(and will continue into the quadrennia ahead) to work 



for "a world of equity and justice, a world of shared 
economic progress, a world in which future generations 
can live secure and well, at peace with themselves and 
wath the environment on which their very survival will 
depend." 

A Cost to Discipleship 

As in past quadrennia, the GBCS again carried on 
its work while confronted with steadily shrinking finan- 
cial resources and faced with increasing requests for 
actions by this agency. Over 30 of the resolutions com- 
ing out of the 1992 General Conference included re- 
quests for actions by the GBCS. Some of these-such as 
promoting UN Day, giving emphasis to U.S. gun vio- 
lence, or continuing the work on genetic science — 
GBCS staff had already been doing. Others-such as a 
UMC mental health network, resources on AIDS, or 
Native American social witness programs — GBCS staff 
began to do. Work on some of the others remains in the 
gestation stage. 

During this quadrennium, GBCS staff members 
frequently have had to devote too many work hours to 
quieting the anxieties of constituents shaken by the 
spoken or written words of critics who seek to defame 
GBCS actions and statements based on United Method- 
ist positions adopted by General Conference. The GBCS 
General Secretary, in his March 1995 report to the 
board, talked about Christian response to the unsettling 
stirrings in Church and society in this era: 

"We are members of the Body of Christ, and we are 
persons who, in faith, continue to discern how our faith 
consciousness resonates with society's actions. No mat- 
ter how many times we are misquoted in the church and 
secular press, no matter how our minisfries may be 
interpreted by others, no matter what personal cost it 
takes to sustain our witness, we must be clear that our 
expressions of personal righteousness are clearly 
bound to our expressions of civic and public righteous- 
ness in the faith." 

"We are mandated to be the public policy agency of 
The United Metiiodist Church," Dr. Fassett stated. "We 
are mandated to address issues of private and public 
righteousness. We do not accept the prophesy that we 
wOl die in a polluted land. We do not accept the aphorism 
that there will always be wars and rumors of wars. And 
we must not accept the conclusion that the poor will 
always be among us. Our mandate from God is not to 
abide in or be resigned to these kinds of prophesies, but 
to defy the conclusions. To do so is not heresy; it is 
discipleship, and there is a cost to discipleship." 



Church and Society 



117 



Proposed Changes to The Book of Discipline 



^70. 

Petition Number: 20918-CS-70-D; GBCS. 

Water, Air, Soil, Minerals, Plants 
Amend ^ 704: 

A) Water, Air, Soil, Minerals, Plants. — ^We support 
and encourage social policies that serve to reduce and 
control the creation of industrial by-products and waste; 
facilitate the safe processing and disposal of toxic and 
nuclear waste; encourage reduction of municipal 
waste; provide for appropriate recycling and_disposal 
of municipal waste; and assist the clean-up enhance 
the rejuvenation of polluted air, water, and soil. We 
support measures designed to maintain and restore 
natural ecosystems, which will halt the spread of de - 
s erts into formerly productive lands. We support regu - 
lations designed to protect plant life, including those that 
provide for reforestation and for conservation of grass - 
lands. We support policies that develop alternatives to 
retard the indiscriminate use of chemicals, including 
those used for growing,. ..We urge development of inter- 
national agreements concerning equitable utilization of 
the world's ocean's resources for human benefit so 
long as the integrity of the earth seas is maintained. 
Moreover, we support policies on the part of govern 
mcnts and industries that conserve fossil and other 
fuels, and that eliminate methods of securing minerals 
that de s troy plants, animals, and soil. We encourage 
creation of new sources for food and power, while main - 
taining the goodness of the earth. 

^70. 

Petition Number: 20919-CS-70-D; GBCS. 



Animal Life 



Amend ^ 70C: 



C) [Second Sentence] Furthermore, wW e encour- 
age the preservation of all animal species new includ- 
ing those threatened with extinction. We also rccogninc 
the necc3sit>' of the use of animals in medical and cos - 
metic rcscorchi however, we reject the abuse of the 



^70. 

Petition Number: 20920-CS-70-D; GBCS. 
Space 
Delete ^ 70D and substitute new text: 

D) Space. — The universe, known and un- 
known, is the creation of God and is due the 
respect we are called to give the Earth. 

^70. 

Petition Number: 20921-CS-70-D; GBCS. 
Science and Technology 

Delete the first paragraph of ^ 70E and substitute 
new text 

E) Science and Technology. — We recognize science 
and technology as an interpretation and use of God's 
natural world. 

170. 

Petition Number: 20229-CS-70.1-D;CNV, WPA 
A Dioxin-Free Future 
Amend ^ 704: 

A) Water, Air, Soil, Minerals, Plants. — ^We support 
and encourage social policies that serve to reduce and 
control the creation of industrial by-products and waste; 
facilitate the safe processing and disposal of toxic and 
nuclear waste and that move toward the elimination 
of both;.. .We support policies that retard the indiscrimi- 
nate use of chemicals, including those used for growing, 
processing, and preserving food, and encourage 
strongly urge adequate research... 

171. 

Petition Number: 20001-CS-71-D;LRK 
Abortion 
Amend f 71H: 

[Fourth sentence] But we are equally bound to re- 
spect the sacredness of the life and well being of the 
mother, for whom devastating damage death may re- 
sult from an unacceptable untimely pregnancy. In con- 
tinuity with past Christian teaching, we recognize tragic 
conflicts of life with life that may ju9tif>' make prefer- 
able the option of abortion, and in such cases support 
the legal option of abortion under proper medical proce- 



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DCA Advance Edition 



dures. We cannot affirm unconditionally reject abor- 
tion as an acceptable means of birth control , and wc 
unconditionally reject it as a means of gender selection . 
We call all Christians.. .We encourage call for the 
Church to provide nurturing mmistries to those who 
give birth and to those children whose birth par- 
ents are unable to parent 



^71. 

Petition Number: 2(X)11-CS-71-D;VIR 

Family Violence and Abuse 
Add the following new text at the end of ^ TLA): 

We recognize that fiamily violence/abuse, in all 
its forms — ^verbal, psychological, physical, sex- 
ual — is detrimental to die covenant of the human 
community. We further recognize the primary re- 
sponsibility of the church to provide a safe envi- 
ronment for the victims, be they spouse, child, 
parent, or other member of the family. While we 
deplore the actions of the abuser, we affirm that 
person to be wordiy of God's redeeming love. 

1[71. 

Petition Number: 20022-CS-71-D;CNV. 

Equal Protection and Treatment 
Within The United Methodist Church 

Add a new sentence before the last sentence of ^ 
71G: 

We are equally committed to equal protection 
and treatment within the United Methodist 
Church. 

^71. 

Petition Number: 20053-CS71-D;NGA, WNC, SGA, 
EPA WNY, SIN. 

Human Sexuality 

Retain the current statements regarding homosexu- 
ality in ^ 1\F. 

^71. 

Petition Number: 20120-CS-71-D;WIS. 

Correct Language which Classifies Lesbian 
and Gay Persons 

Delete the second sentence of the first paragraph of 
'n7LF. 



^71. 

Petition Number: 20121-CS71-D;IWA 
Christian Sexual Morality 

Add the following new text after the second sen- 
tence of ^71 F;: 

We reaf&rm the Christian moral standard of 
fideUty in marriage and celibacy in singleness, for 
all persons. This standard was practiced and 
tau^t by Jesus Christ The widespread rejection 
of this standard by secular culture, and the frailty 
of himian nature are reasons for the church to 
uphold and advocate this standard, not to retreat 
from it 



^71. 

Petition Number: 20122-CS-71-D;CNV, NNJ, NYK. 
NIL, GBCS, NYMO. 

Human Sexuality 

Amend the third sentence of the fifth paragraph of 
^7LF: 

Although wc do not condone the practice of homo - 
sexuality and consider this practice incompatible with 
Christian teaching, wW e affirm that God's grace is avail- 
able to all. 



^71. 

Petition Number: 20153-CS-71-D;NGA, NCA 
Abortion 
Amend ^ 7L^: 

[Third sentence] Our belief in the sanctity of un- 
born human life makes us reluctant to approve abortion. 
Indeed, we cannot af&rm abortion as an accept- 
able means of birth control, and we uncondition- 
ally reject it as a means of gender selection. Btrt 
wWe are equally bound to respect the sacredness of the 
life and well-being of the mothe r, for whom devastating 
damage may result from an unacceptable pregnancy . In 
continuity with past Christian teaching, we recognize 
tragic conflicts where the life of the unborn direcdy 
and immediately threatens the life of the mother of 
life with life that may justify abortion, and in such cases 
encourage clergy and congregations to pray for 
and support such mothers and their families, stip- 
port the legal option of abortion under proper medical 
procedures. Wc cannot affirm abortion as an acceptable 
mean s of birth control, and wc unconditionally reject it 
as a means of gender selection. Wc call all Christians to 
a searching and prayerful inquiry into the sorts of con - 
ditions that may warrant abortion. Furthermore, wWe 
call for the Church to provide nurturing ministries to 
those persons who have obtained abortions for \*1iat- 
ever reasons terminate a pregnancy . Also wWe call 



Church and Society 



119 



encourage the Church to provide a full range of wel- 
coming, nurturing ministries to those who give giving 
birth — especially to those in the midst of "crisis 
pregnancies". Finally, we acknowledge that gGov- 
emmental laws and regulations do not provide all the 
guidance required by the informed Christian con- 
science... 



^71. 

Petition Number: 20184-CS-71-D;NAL. 

Abortion: The Beginning and Ending of Life 
Amend ^ 71i/: 

H) Abortion. — ^The beginning of life and the ending 
of life are the God-given boundaries of human existence. 
While individuals have always had some degree of con- 
trol over when they would die, they now have the awe- 
some power to determine when and even whether new 
individuals will be born. Our belief in the sanctity of 
unborn human life makes us reluctant unable to ap- 
prove abortion. Btrt However, we are equally bound to 
respect the sacredness of the life nnd well - being of the 
mother, for whom devastating damage may result from 
an unacceptable eminently life threatening preg- 
nancy. In continuity with past Christian teaching, we 
recognize tragic conflicts of life with life that may-jttstify 
abortion warrant the termination of a pregnancy, 
and in such cases support the legol option of abortion 
under proper medical procedures leave that decision 
up to each individual as they seek God's guidance, 
and the advice of their physician, pastor, and fam- 
ily. We cannot affirm unconditionally reject abortion 
as an acceptable means of birth control, and we uncon- 
ditionally reject it as a means of gender selection. We 
call all Christians to a searching and prayerful inquiry 
into the sorts of conditions that may warrant cause one 
to consider abortion... 

171. 

Petition Number: 20195-CS-71-D;HOL. 
Human Sexuality 

Amend the last sentence of the first paragraph of % 
71F: 

Further, within the context of our understanding of 
this gift of God, we rceognigc that God challenges us to 
find rcsponaiblc, committed, and loving forma of cxprca - 
8i©ftwe gratefully receive the Scriptural witness to 
ttie will of God that heterosexual marriage is the 
responsible, committed, and loving relationship 
for sexual expression in its fullness. 



171. 

Petition Number: 20196-CS-71-D;MNN. 

Fair and Inclusive Treatment of Persons 
of Homosexual Orientation 

Affirm the statements regarding homosexuals in ^ 

71G. 

171. 

Petition Number: 20261-CS71-D;ORI, MNN. 
Human Sexuality 
Amend the fifth paragraph of ^ 71F: 

[Third sentence] Although we do not condone the 
practice of homo s exuality and consider this practice 
incompatible with Christian teaching, wW e affirm that 
God's grace is available to all. 

171. 

Petition Number: 20262-CS-71-D;ORI. 
Human Sexuality 
Amend the second paragraph of ^ 71F: 

...We reject all sexual expressions which damage or 
destroy the humanity God has given us as birthright, 
and we affirm only that sexual expression which en- 
hances that same humanit y, in the midst of diverse 
opinion as to what constitutes that enhancement . We 
believe that sexual relations wliere one or both 
partners are exploitative, abusive, or promiscuous 
are beyond the parameters of acceptable Christian 
behavior, and are ultimately destructive to indi- 
viduals, families, and the social order. 

171. 

Petition Number: 20283-CS-71-D;PNW. 

An Amendment on Men and Women 
Add a new sub-paragraph after ^ 71E: 

Women and Men. — We affirm with scripture the 
basic similarity of the sexes and assert that it is 
human similarities and not differences that allow 
persons to find intimacy and partnership in ac- 
cordance witfi God's intention. We reject the an- 
cient dualism between male and female which has 
led to the erroneous notion that one gender is 
superior to another, and that one gender must 
strive against another, and that members of one 
gender may receive love, power and esteem only 
at the expense of another. We especially reject the 
idea that God made individuals as incomplete 
Augments made whole only in relationship to an- 
other. We call upon women and men alike to share 



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DCA Advance Edition 



power and control, to learn to give freely and to 
receive freely, to be complete and to respect the 
wholeness of others. We seek for every individual 
opportunities and freedom to love and be loved, to 
seek justice and to practice moral self-determina- 
tion. We understand our gender diversity to be a gift 
from God, intended to add to the rich variety of 
human experience and perspective; and we guard 
against attitudes and traditions that would use this 
good gift to leave members of one sex more vulner- 
able in relationships than members of another. 

^71. 

Petition Number: 20284-CS-71-D;WMI. 

Amendment on Human Sexuality 
Amend the fifth paragraph of % 71.F: 

[Third sentence] Although we do not condone the 
practice of homosexuality and conaidcr this practice 
incompatible with Christian teaching, While the 
church is not of one mind in imderstanding the 
relationship between sexuahty and historic Chris- 
tian teaching, we affirm that God's grace is available to 
aU. 

^71. 

Petition Number: 20285-CS-71-D;WMI, HOL. 
Human Sexuality 

Amend the fourth paragraph of ^ 7LFby adding the 
following after the first sentence: 

We call upon the general agencies and the 
local churches to afBrm sexual abstinence outside 
of marriage as the standard of United Methodism. 

^71. 

Petition Number: 20286-CS-71-D;PNW. 

An Amendment on Homosexual Persons 
Amend the fifth paragraph of ^ 7 IF: 

[Thu-d sentence] Although we do not condone the 
practice of homosexuality and consider this practice 
incompatible with Christian teaching, we affirm that 
God's grace is available to all. Research, theological 
inquiry, and spiritual discernment have not led 
United Methodists to a consensus of the etiology 
of homosexual orientation. We remain divided in 
our understanding of homosexual orientation and 
practice. We continue to seek God's truth and 
understanding in a spirit of humility and love. 



^71. 

Petition Number: 20287-CS71-D;PNW. 

An Amendment on the Role of Sexuality 

Delete the first paragraph of ^ 7LFand replace with 
new text 

F) Human Sexuality. — In sexuality we find God's 
gifts of the power of intimacy and mutual pleasuring as 
well as the gift of procreation. We affirm that sexual 
pleasure and happiness are significant parts of human 
experience. We honor the goodness of sexuality and 
give thanks to God for its diversity. As stewards of this 
gift we seek to find responsible, committed, and loving 
forms of expression while remaining accountable to 
God's demands for justice. We express a deep concern 
for those who are sexually abused, exploited, violated 
and isolated, and we seek to know and learn fi-om those 
who have been so injured. We urge to church to advo- 
cate on behalf of such persons and to work with them 
for justice in the social order. 

171. 

Petition Number: 20288-CS-71-D;WMI. 

Violence against Abortionists 
Add the following sentence at the end of % 71H: 

Fiuthermore, we do not encourage or con- 
done, imder any circtmistances, any form of vio- 
lent protest or action against anyone involved in 
the abortion dilemma. 

171. 

Petition Number: 20289-CS-71-D;NAK, HOL 

Concerning Alternatives to Abortion 
Amend ^ 71H: 

We call all Christians to a searching and prayerful 
inquiry into the sorts of conditions that may warrant 
abortion. We commit our church to provide alter- 
natives to abortion at all levels of church life. We 

call for the Church... 



171. 

Petition Number: 20526-CS-71-D;NAK, SIL, EOH, 
WVA,HOL,TEX. 

Human Sexuality 

Retain the next to the last sentence of ^ 71F without 
change. 



Church and Society 



121 



^71. 

Petition Number: 20700-CS-71-D;KEN. 
Human Sexuality 

Retain the present language on homosexuality in 
the last paragraph of ^ 7LF. 

1171. 

Petition Number: 20701-CS-71-D;NIL 
Human Sexuality 

Delete the first, second, and fifth paragraphs of 
^71F and substitute the following text: 

F) Human Sexuality. — ^We recognize sexuality as a 
gift of God to all persons. We believe persons may be 
more fully human when they acknowledge this good gift 
for themselves and others. We call all persons to a 
disciplined and responsible stewardship of this gift, so 
that it may be fulfilled in them. We recognize our limited 
understanding of this precious gift and we encourage 
theological, social science and medical disciplines to join 
together in efforts to increased knowledge and under- 
standing of human sexuality. We call on the church to 
take the lead in this endeavor. 

Because we understand sexuality as a gift of 
God, we are challenged to responsible, committed 
and loving forms of sexual expression. We, there- 
fore, afiBrm sexual relations only in the sanctity of 
the marriage bond and in the sanctity of commit- 
ted and covenanted relationships. Sex may be- 
come exploitative in any human relationship. We, 
therefore, reject all sexual expressions which de- 
mean, subordinate or damage the humanity God 
has given us, and we afSrm only those sexual 
expressions which enhance and fulfil this human- 
ity. 

All persons, regardless of gender or sexual 
orientation, are individuals of sacred worth. The 
ministry and guidance of the church should be 
available to all who struggle toward human and 
sexual fulfillment The church should provide the 
spiritual and emotional care of a fellowship which 
enables reconciling relationships with God, with 
others, and with self. We affirm that God's grace 
is available to all. We commit ourselves to be in 
ministry for and with all persons. 

We deplore all forms of the commercialization... 



^71. 

Petition Number: 20702-CS71-D;EOH. 

Regarding Human Sexuality 

Amend the last sentence of the first paragraph of ^ 

7 LP: 

Further, within the context of our understanding of 
this gift of God, we rccogninc that God challcngca us to 
find rcaponaiblc, committed, and lovingforma of cxprcs- 
«i©ft we gratefully receive the Scriptural witness to 
the will of God that heterosexual marriage is the 
responsible, committed, and loving relationship 
for sexual expression in its fullness. 

^71. 

Petition Number: 20703-CS-71-D;EOH. 
Abortion 
Add a new sentence at the end of 11 71H: 

In addition, in the fece of increasing violence 
at medical facilities which provide abortion serv- 
ices, we remind all persons, no matter how ear- 
nest they are in their personal objection to any 
form of abortion, that the United Methodist 
Church affirms that those who dissent from any 
given law are to do so by "refraining fi'om vio- 
lence." (Discipline: 74E) 

^71. 

Petition Number: 20704-CS71-D;KEN. 

Abortion 
Amend ^ 71H: 

...we recognize tragic conflicts of life with life that 
may justify abortion, these conflicts being incest, 
rape, or endangering the mother's life, and in such 
cases... 

171. 

Petition Number: 20705-CS-71-D;KEN. 
Abortion 
Amend the fourth sentence of ^ 71//: 

But we are equally bound to respect the sacredness 
of the life and well-being of the mother , for whom dev - 
astating damage may result from an unacceptable prcg - 



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DCA Advance Edition 



^71. 

Petition Number: 20706-CS-71-D;KEN. 
Abortion 
Amend the third sentence of ^ 7\H: 

Our belief in the sanctity of unborn human life 
molica U9 reluctant to approve abortion keeps us from 
approving abortion on demand. 

f71. 

Petition Number: 20707-CS71-D;KEN. 
Abortion 
Amend ^ 71//: 

...We call all Christians to a searching and prayerful 
inquiry into the sorts of conditions that may warrant 
abortion, and seek to find alternatives that might 
be available. We call for the Church... 

171. 

Petition Number: 20747-CS-71-D;CAP. 
Human Sexuality 

Amend the fourth paragraph of ^ llFhy adding new 
text after the first sentence: 

We call upon the general agencies and the 
local churches to a£Grm sexual abstinence outside 
of marriage as the behavioral standard of United 
Methodists. 

171. 

Petition Number: 20748-CS-71-D;CAP, KSE. 

Human Sexuality 
Amend the fifth paragraph of ^ 7LF: 

[Tliird sentence] Although we do not condone the 
practice of homoacxuality and consider this practice 
incompatible syith Christian teaching, wW e affirm... 

171. 

Petition Number: 20749-CS-71-D;NEB. 

Abortion 
Retain 1 71H. 



171. 

Petition Number: 20848-CS71-D; GCSRW. 
Sexual Harassment 
Add a new sub-paragraph to ^ 71: 

Sexual harassment. — Sexual harassment is 
any unwanted sexual advance or demand, either 
verbal or physical, which is perceived by the re- 
cipient as demeaning, intimidating or coercive. 
Sexual heirassment must be understood as an ex- 
ploitation of a power relationship rather than as an 
exclusively sexual issue. Sexual harassment also 
includes the creation of a hostile or abusive work- 
ing environment resulting from discrimination on 
the basis of gender. 

Sexuid harassment creates improper, coer- 
cive, and abusive conditions wherever it occurs in 
society. Sexual harassment imdermines the social 
goal of equal opportunity and the climate of mu- 
tual respect between men and women. Unwanted 
sexual attention is wrong and discriminatory. Sex- 
ual harassment interferes with the moral mission 
of the chiu-ch. 



171. 

Petition Number: 20865-CS-71-D; Methodist Federa- 
tion for Social Action, CPA 

Human Sexuality 

Amend the next to last sentence of the fifth para- 
graph of ^71F: 

Although wc do not condone the practice of homo - 
sexuality and consider this practice incompatible vdth 
Christian teaching, wW e affirm that God's grace is avail- 
able to all. 



171. 

Petition Number: 20922-CS-71-D; GBCS. 
Divorce 
Delete ^ 710 and substitute new text 

D) Divorce. — When a married couple is es- 
tranged beyond reconciliation, even after thought- 
ful consideration and cotmsel, divorce is an alter- 
native in the midst of brokenness. Although 
divorce publicly declares that a marriage no longer 
exists, odier covenantal relationships resulting 
from the marriage remain, such as the nurture 
and support of children and extended £unily ties. 
We urge respectful negotiations in deciding the 
custody of minor chUdren, and support the con- 
sideration of either or both parents for this re- 
sponsibility. The welfare of each child is the most 
important consideration. 



Church and Society 



123 



Divorce does not preclude a new marriage. We 
encourage an intentional commitment of the 
church and society to minister compassionately to 
those in the process of divorce, as well as mem- 
bers of divorced and remarried families in a com- 
munity of faith where God's grace is shared by all. 

^72. 

PetiUon Number: 20023-CS-72-D;WYO, CAP, WVA, 
NYK,NIL 

Basic Rights of all Persons 

Add a new sentence at the end of the first paragraph 
of ^72: 

We support the basic rights of all persons to 
equal access to housing, education, employment, 
medical care, legal redress for grievances, emd 
physical protection. 

^72. 

Petition Number: 20305-CS-72-D;WPA 

Rights of Persons with Handicapping Conditions 
Amend ^ 72G: 

G) Rights of Persons with Handicapping Conditions 
People with Disabilities. — ^We recognize.. .We affirm the 
responsibility of the Church and society to be in ministry 
with all persons, including those persona with mentally, 
physically, and/or psychologically handicapping condi - 
tions people with disabilities whose disabilities... We 
urge the Church and society to receive the gifts of 
persons wth handicapping conditions people with 
disabilities to enable them... 

172. 

Petition Number: 20868-CS72-D; Methodist Federa- 
tion for Social Action, CPA. 

Basic Human Rights 

Add a new sentence at the end of the first paragraph 
of 172: 

We support the basic rights of all persons to 
equal access to housing, education, employment, 
medical care, legal redress for grievances, and 
physical protection. 



172. 

Petition Number: 20923-CS-72-D; NIN. 
The Social Community 
Add a new sub-paragraph after 'd 72C: 

Once considered the property of their moth- 
ers, unborn children are now acknowledged to be, 
if not fully human, at least as human beings in 
process. Because of this, we are reluctant to sup- 
port any view which would view the developing 
fetus as merely a mass of tissue. We believe every 
unborn child has the right to be loved, if not by its 
natural bom parents, then by adoptive parents. 
With the right to be loved comes also the right to 
be bom and accepted into the world as a child of 
God. 

172. 

Petition Number: 20924-CS-72-D; GBCS. 
Rights of Religious Minorities 
Amend the third sentence of ^ 725: 

In particular, wW e condemn antiScmitc, anti Mus - 
lim, and anti Christian attitudes and practices in both 
theif all overt and covert forms of religious intoler- 
ance, being especially sensitive... 

172. 

Petition Number: 20925-CS72-D; GBCS. 

Rights of Persons with Handicapping Conditions 
Amend ^ 72G: 

G) Rights of Persons with Ha n dicappi n g Conditions 
Disabilities. — ^We recognize.. .We affirm the responsibil- 
ity of the church and society to be in ministry with all 
persons, including those persons with mentally, physi- 
cally, and/or psychologically handicapping conditions 
disabilities whose disabilities or differences in appear - 
ance or behavior create aproblem... We urge the Church 
and society to receive the gifts of j. ersons with handicap - 
ping conditions disabilities to enai-^le them... 

172. 

Petition Number: 20926-CS-72-D; GBCS. 

Media Violence and Christian Values 

Amend the next to last sentence of the last para- 
graph of ^ 720: 

¥et Many in the media remain aloof to the issue, 
claiming to reflect society rather than to influence it 
society. 



124 



DCA Advance Edition 



^72. 

Petition Number: 20927-CS-72-D; GBCS. 
Right to Health Care 
Add a new sub-paragraph at the end of ^ 72: 

Right to Health Care. — Health is a condition of 
physical, mental, social, find spiritual well-being 
and we view it as a responsibility — public and 
private. Health care is a basic human right. Psalm 
146 speaks of the God "who executes justice for 
the oppressed; who gives food to the himgry. The 
Lord sets prisoners free; the Lord opens the eyes 
of the blind." It is imjust to construct or perpetu- 
ate barriers to physical wholeness or full partici- 
pation in commtmity. 

We encourage individuals to pursue a healthy 
life style and affirm the importance of preventive 
health care, health education, environmental and 
occupational safety, good nutrition, emd secure 
housing in achieving health. We also recognize the 
role of governments to assure that each individual 
has access to those elements necessary to good 
healdi. 



173. 

Petition Number: 20024-CS-73-D;CNV, CAP. 
The Rights of all Persons 

Delete the first sentence of ^ 73C and substitute the 
following: 

C) Work and Leisure. — Every person has the 
right to a job at a living wage. Where the private 
sector cannot or does not provide jobs for all who 
seek and need them, it is the responsibility of 
government, organized to "provide for the general 
welfare" (US Constitution), to provide for the crea- 
tion of such jobs. 



SI73. 

Petition Number: 20866-CS-73-D; Methodist Federa- 
tion for Social Action, CPA. 

Right to a Job 

Delete the first sentence of ^ 73C and substitute the 
following new text 

Every person has the right to a job at a living 
wage. Where the private sector cannot or does not 
provide jobs for all who seek and need them, it is 
the responsibiUty of government, organized "to 
provide for the general welfare" (U.S. Constitu- 
tion) to provide for the creation of such jobs. 



173. 

Petition Number: 20928-CS-73-D; GBCS. 
Consumption 
Amend ^ 73D: 

D) Consumption. — We support efforts to ensure 
truth in pricing, packaging, lending, and advertising. We 
assert that the consumers' primary responsibility is to 
provide themselves with needed goods and services of 
high quality at the lowest cost consistent with economic 
practices. They Consumers should exercise.. .These 
who manufacture goods and offer scr\'icc3 serve society 
best when they aid consumers in fulfilling these respon - 
sibilities. Consumers should evaluate.. .express dissatis- 
faction with harmful economic, social, or ecological 
practices.. . For example, these methods can be used to 
influence better television and radio programming. 

173. 

Petition Number: 20929-CS-73-D; GBCS. 

Poverty 
Amend the second sentence of ^ 73E: 

Increasing technology aft4 when accompanied by 
exploitative economic practices impoverishes many per- 
sons and makes poverty self-perpetuating. 

173. 

Petition Number: 20930-CS-73-D; GBCS. 



Gambling 



Amend 1 73: 



[Second sentence] As an act of faith and-leve con- 
cern, Christians should abstain.. .and constructive ends. 
The church shotdd promote Community standards 
and personal lifestyles should be such as wWch would 
make unnecessary... 

174. 

Petition Number: 20263-CS-74-D;NEB. 
Cultural Yiolence 
Add a new sub-paragraph after ^ 74 G: 

Cultural Violence, — ^The pain of Jesus over his 
people's blindness to "things that make for peace" 
as he rode into Jerusalem on Palm Sunday enters 
our hearts when we view the addiction to violence 
which permeates the cultures of our time, includ- 
ing otu* own. In shame we confess that, apart from 
God's grace through Christ, revenge, hatred, coer- 
cion, and violence lie close to us. We commit our 
covenant commtmity of faith to discernment, un- 



Church and Society 



125 



derstanding, and living out in all our beliefs and 
behaviors the ways of reconciliation and coopera- 
tion in the resolution of conflict. We will do so in our 
church schools, our prayer groups, oiu- study and 
service and mission groups, our worship and ad- 
ministration, in our individual heart of hearts, and 
in oiu' daily lives. We will do more than criticize. We 
will do more them bewail the behavior which scares 
us and retreat into hoped-for safe havens. We will 
heed the word of the writer of Ephesians, "But if you 
bite and devour one another take heed that you are 
not consumed by one another" (5:15), and the 
more ancient word of Deuteronomy, "...I have set 
before you life and death, blessing and curse; there- 
fore choose life, thatyou and your descendants may 
live." (30:19b) We will become "ambassadors for 
Christ," who carry out oiu" "ministry of reconcili- 
ation.'' (II Cor. 5) 

^74. 

Petition Number: 20931-CS-74-D; GBCS. 
Political Responsibility 
Amend the last sentence of ^ 745: 

The church should continually exert a strong ethi- 
cal influence upon the state, supporting policies and 
programs deemed to be just and compassionate and 
opposing policies and programs which are net unjust 

^74. 

Petition Number: 20932-CS74-D; GBCS. 
Education 
Amend the last sentence of ^ 74Z): 

The state should not use its authority to inculcate 
promote particular religious beliefs... 

^74. 

Petition Number: 20933-CS-74-D; GBCS. 

Civil Obedience and Civil Disobedience 
Amend 1 74£:: 

[Fourth sentence] ...after having exhausted all legal 
recourse, to resist or disobey laws which they deem to 
be unjust or laws which are discriminately enforced. 
Even then, respect for law should be shown by refrain- 
ing from violence and by accepting being willing to 
accept the costs of disobedience.. .We assert the duty of 
churches to support everyone those who suffer* fef 
because of their stands the cause of conscience rep- 
resented by non-violent beliefs or actS7-an4. We 
urge governments seriously to consider restoration of 
right s to such persona while also maintaining respect for 
those who obey ensure civil rights, as defined by the 



International Covenant on Civil and Political 
Rights, to persons in legal jeopardy because of 
those non-violent acts. 



^74. 

Petition Number: 20934-CS-74-D; GBCS. 
Military Service 
Delete the first two sentences of ^ 74G. 

^76. 

Petition Number: 20306-CS-76-D;WPA. 
Our Social Creed 
Amend the fourth paragraph of ^ 76: 

We commit ourselves to the rights of men, women, 
children, youth, young adults, the aging, and those with 
handicapping conditions people with disabilities;... 

^728. 

Petition Number: 20008-CS-728-D;MOW,MOE. 

Flexibility in Annual Conference Structure 
Amend 1 728: 

1. The Annual Conference shall organize.. .as set 
forth in ^^ 1102-1104. The responsibilities of the 
Board of Church and Society may be assigned to 
an existing or newly created multifunctional 
agency of the Conference Council that cares for the 
functions of and the connectional relationships of 
the General Board of Church and Society, the 
Conference, the districts, and the local churches. 
The person or persons serving as member(s) of 
the General Board of Church and Society may be 
member(s) of the Conference Board of Church 
and Society or equivalent structure and may be 
granted voting privileges. 

3. The conference board, in cooperation with the 
General Board of Church and Society and the Annual 
Conference Council on Ministries , shall develop... 

1728. 

Petition Number: 20009-CS-728-D;NNJ. 

Conference Board of Church and Society 
Amend ^ 728: 

1. The Annual Conference shall organize a Board of 
Church and Society or an equivalent structure (or the 
responsibilities outlined below may be assigned to 
such other organization as the Annual Conference 
provides pursuant to % 707.x) that shall provide... 



126 



DCA Advance Edition 



1728. 

Petition Number: 20472-CS-728-D;WNC, NTX. 

Eliminate Annual Conference Board 
of Church and Society 

Delete 1 728. 

1728. 

Petition Number: 20443-CS-728.1-D;NMX. 

Conference Board of Church and Society 
Amend ^728.1: 

1. ?^ Annual Conferences shall organize provide 
for the fulfillment of the purposes, duties and re- 
sponsibilities assigned to the-a Board of Church and 
Society by ^728,3-6 and elsewhere, or an cquiva 
lent structure by structuring themselves as they 
deem appropriate, that In doing so, it shall provide 
for.. .as set forth in ^^1102-1104. References in this 
paragraph, and elsewliere in the Discipline to "the 
Board of Chiirch and Society," or to "the board," 
in appropriate context, shall be interpreted and 
construed to refer to the structure provided pur- 
suant to this paragraph, whatever called or 
named. 

1728. 

Petition Number: 20935-CS-728.1-D; GBCS. 

Annual Conference Board of Church and Society 
Amend ^ 728.1: 

1. The Annual Conference shall organize a Board of 
Church and Society or an equivalent structure that shall 
provide for the connectional relationship between 
the General Board of Church and Society and the 
conference, district, and local church, as well as 
for Church and society responsibilities related to the 
purpose, objectivesT and responsibilities scope of work 
of the General Board of Church and Society as set forth 
in T^ 1102-1104. 



1728. 

Petition Number: 20444-CS-728.2-D;NMX. 

Membership of the Board of Church and Society 
Amend f 728.2: 

2. The conference Board of Church and Society or 
equivalent structure shall be composed of those persons 
as determined by the Annual Conference. It may have 
membership in common with other structures, 
and it may be assigned other duties and responsi- 
bihties. When it sits as the Board, the structure 
should include including as an ex officio member the 
mission coordinator for Christian social involvement of 
the conference United Methodist Women. Guideline s 
for inclusivcncss in the membership shall be followed 
(11707. 4 ). 

1728. 

Petition Number: 20936-CS728.2-D; GBCS. 

Membership of the Annual Conference Board 

of Church and Society 
Amend 1 728.2: 

2. The conference Board of Church and Society or 
equivalent structure shall be composed of those persons 
as determined by the Annual Conference including as 
an ex officio member , by virtue of their offices, the 
mission coordinator for Christian social involvement of 
the conference United Methodist Women and mem- 
bers of the General Board of Church and Society 
from the Annual Conference who shall serve 
within hmits set by %% 707.5 and 810.5. Guide- 
lines... 

1753. 

Petition Number: 20555-CS-753-D;WNC. 

Eliminate District Director of and Committee 
on Church and Society 

Delete ^ 753. 



1728. 

Petition Number: 21632-CS-728.1-D; GCOM. 
Board of Church and Society 
Amend II 728.1: 

1. The Annual Conference shall organize a Board of 
Church and Society or an equivalent structure that 
other structiu-e to provide for these functions and 
maintain the connectional relationships. It shall 
provide for... 



11102. 

Petition Number: 20937-CS-1102-D; GBCS. 

The Purpose of the Board of Church and Society 
Amend ^ 1102: 

[Second sentence] It shall seek to bring the whole 
of human life, including all activities, possessions, use 
of resources, and community.. .It shall show the mem- 
bers of the Church and the societythatthe reconciliation 
which that God effected... 



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127 



^1103. 

Petition Number: 20938-CS-l 103-D; GBCS. 
Objectives 
Amend ^ 1103: 

Objectives. — ^To achieve its purpose, the board shall: 

pProject plans and programs that challenge the 
members of The United Methodist Church to work 
through their own local churches, through ecumenical 
channels, and through society toward personal, social, 
and civic righteousness; te 

ftAssist the District and Annual Conferences with 
needed resources in areas of such concerns; t» 

aAnalyze the issues whieh that confront the person, 
the local community, the nation persons, communi- 
ties, nations, and the world; and to 

eEncourage Christian lines of action which that 
assist humankind to move toward a world where peace 
and justice are achieved. 

^1104. 

Petition Number: 20867-CS-1104-D; United Methodist 
Appalachian Development Committee. 

Responsibility of the General Board of Church 

and Society 
Amend the fourth paragraph of ^ 1104: 

The board will maintain a close relationship with the 
General Commissions on Religion and Race, aft4 the 
Commission on the Status and Role of Women, the 
Appalachian Development Committee, and the 
U.S./Mexico Bi-Lateral Mission Advisory Commit- 
tee as they seek to coordinate... 

^1104. 

Petition Number: 20939-CS-1104-D; GBCS. 
Responsibilities 
Amend ^ 1104: 

Responsibilities. — ^The pPrime responsibility of the 
board.. .Furthermore, the board and its executives shall 
provide forthright witness and action on those social 
issues of human well-being, justice, peace and the 
integrity of creation that call Christians to respond as 
forgiven people for whom Christ died . In particular, the 
board shall conduct a program of research, education, 
and action, consistent with the Social Principles 
and policies adopted by the General Conference, 



on the wide range of issues confronting that confront 
the Church consistent with the Social Principles and the 
policies adopted by the General Conference . 

The board shall analyze long-range social trends 
and their underlying ethical values , systemic alterna - 
tives, and strategics for social change and explore alter 
natc futures . It shall explore systemic strategies for 
social change and alternative futures. It shall 
speak its convictions, interpretations and con- 
cerns to the Church, and to die world. 

The board. ..particularly on the specific aeetal issues 
prioritized by the board. Special attention shall be given 
to nurturing the niuture of the active constituency of 
the board. The board will encoiu-age by encouraging 
an exchange of ideas on strategy and methodology for 
social change. Through and enabling church members 
through conferences, districts, coalitions, and networks 
it will assist church members te as they identify and 
respond to critical social issues at the community, state 
end regional, nationed and international levels. 

The board will shall maintain a close relationships 
with the General Commissions on Religion and Race and 
Status and Role of Women as they seek to coordinate 
the denominational support.. .according to guidelines 
stated in the Book of Discipline. 

The board shall spcalt to the Church, and to the 
world, its convictions, interpretations, and concerns, 
recognizing the freedom and responsibility of all Chri s- 
tians to study, interpret, and act on any or all rccommen 
dations in keeping with their own Christian calling. 

In cooperation vnth...and institutions of The United 
Methodist Church. (See Judicial Council Decision 
387.) 



^1106. 

Petition Number: 20940-CS-1106-D; GBCS. 

Organization of the General Board of Church 

and Society 
Amend TI 1106: 

Organization. — ^The General Board of Church and 
Society shall be composed according to the instructions 
defined for all program boards in organized as speci- 
fied in its By-Laws and in harmony with ^<J802-810 
of the General Provisions with the addition of three 
Central Conference members one clergy, one layman, 
and one laywoman — to be elected by the Council of 
Bishops upon Nomination by the Central Conference 
College of Bi s hops, with the exception that each 
jurisdiction shall elect to the board only one per- 
son from each of its episcopal areas and one from 
each of its missionary and language conferences. 



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^1106. 

Petition Number: 21647-CS1106-D; GCOM. 

Organization of the General Board of Church 

and Society 
Amend ^ 1106: 

Organization. — 1. The General Board of Church 
and Society shall have sixty-four (64) members con- 
stituted in accordance with ^ 805.3a and be eem- 
po9cd according to the inatrucdons defined for all pro - 
gram boards in organized as specified in its By-Laws 
and in harmony with ^802-810 of the General Provi- 
sions with the addition of three Central conference 
mcmbcra - onc clergy, one la^Tnan and one la>'woman - to 
be elected by the Council of Biahopa upon nomination 
by the Central Conference College of Bishops . 

The membership shall be constituted as fol- 
lows: 

a) Jurisdictional members — Clergy, laywomen 
and laymen shall be elected to die board by the 
Jurisdictional conference upon nomination fi"om 
the Annual Conference in accordance with ^ 
805.3b, based on the following formula: North 
Central - 7, Northeastern - 8, South Central - 10, 
Southeastern - 11 and Western - 3. 

b) Central Conference members — Five Central 
Conference members shall be elected to the board 
on nomination by the Council of Bishops, accord- 
ing to die provisions in % 805.3c. At least one 
Central Conference member shall be from Central 
Zaire Annual Conference. 

c) Episcopal members — Nine (9) episcopal mem- 
bers, including at least three (3) from the Central 
Conferences, shall be named by the Council of 
Bishops. 

d) One member elected by Iglesia Metodista 
Autonoma Afiliada de Puerto Rico. 

e) Additional members — (1) United Method- 
ist — Additional members are nominated by a com- 
mittee composed of three persons from each juris- 
diction (one clergy, one laywomen and one 
layman) elected by the jurisdictional conference. 
They shall elect up to nine (9) additional members 
to ensure inclusivity and expertise. 

2. It is recommended that the board elect at 
least one of the additional members without vote, 
from among the other chxu-ches of the Consult- 
ation on Church Union. 



^1107. 

Petition Number: 20941-CS-1107-D; GBCS. 

Vacancies 
Amend % 1107: 

Vacancies. — ^Vacancies in the board membership 
shall be filled by the procedure defined in ^812 of the 
General Provisions . 

^1108. 

Petition Number: 20942-CS1108-D; GBCS. 

Officers 
Delete ^ 1108. 

^1109. 

Petition Number: 20943-CS-1109-D; GBCS. 

Executive Committee 
Delete ^ 1109. 

^1110. 

Petition Number: 20944-CS-lllO-D; GBCS. 

Meetings 
Delete f 1110. 

^1111. 

Petition Number: 20945-CS-llll.l-D; GBCS. 
Financial Support 
Delete ^ 1111.1 and substitute new text: 

1. The General Conference shall determine 
and provide the funding for the board in accord 
with poUcies and procedures of ^906. 

^1111. 

Petition Number: 20946-CS-1111.2-D; GBCS. 
Financial Support 
Amend the first sentence of "J 1111.2: 

2. ...in accordance with its own rules and provisions 
of the Book of Discipline. 

^1112. 

Petition Number: 20947-CS1112-D; GBCS. 

Internal Organization 
Delete ^ 1112. 



Church and Society 



129 



^1113. 

Petition Number: 20010-CS-1113.1-D;SNJ. 

Election of General Secretary of General Board 
of Church and Society 

Amend ^1113.1: 

1. The general secretary shall be elected by the 
board in a meinner prescribed by the board, and 

shall be the chief administrative officer.... 



^1113. 

Petition Number: 20949-CS-1113.2-D; GBCS. 

All other staff 
Amend TI 1113.2: 

2. All other staff are to be elected or appointed in a 
manner prescribed by the board and in keeping con- 
sistent with the affirmative action policies of the general 
Church and the board. 



11113. 

Petition Number: 20948-CS-1113.1-D; GBCS. 
Staff 
Amend the first sentence of ^ 1113.1: 

1. ...the supervision of staff, and fef the administra- 
tion of the headquarters office. 



11114. 

Petition Number: 20950-CS-1114-D; GBCS. 
Headquarters 
Amend the second sentence of ^ 1114: 

A United Nations Office shall be conducted main- 
tained in cooperation with the Women's Division of the 
General Board of Global Ministries. 



11115. 

Petition Number: 20951-CS-1115-D; GBCS. 
Bylaws 
Amend ^1115: 

Bylaws. — ^The General Board of Church and Society 
shall provide its own bylaws, which shall not violate any 
provisions of the Constitution or the Book of Discipline;. 
The bylaws and which may be amended... 



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Proposed Resolutions 



The Natural World 

Petition Number: 21045-CS-R79-U; GBCS. 

The Law of the Sea 

Amend "The Law of the Sea," p. 79, The Book of 
Resolutions: 

We recognize that "All creation is the Lord's and we 
are responsible for the ways in which we use and abuse 
it" (1080 Statement of Social Principles) 

[Fourth paragraph] But this ideal is not yet ex - 
pressed in international treaty. So the race is one to ace 
who will be able to exploit and control the resources of 
the seas. The question facing the peoples of the world 
is whether global cooperation or global anarchy will 
prevail. 

The best hope for global cooperation is through the 
United Nations, where representatives of the nations of 
the world arc at work in the conference on developed 
the Law of the Sea. 

The Law of tiie Sea conference worked hopes to 
produce a fair... 

The United Nations, Law of the Sea Treaty is 
concerned with protecting this "common heritage" of 
humanldnd htunfuiity. is negotiating international 
agreements to It would: 

— guarantee unimpeded access to over 100 straits, 
facilitating commercial transportation;... 



— prevent conflicts or "cod wars" lilic the one be 
twecn Iceland and England over fishing waters; 

We also affirm our support for the evolution of 
effective "commons" law, such as the.treaties now un - 
dcr development for the Antarctic, climate, biodiver- 
sity, and outer space, which support* our obligations of 
stewardship, justice, and peace. 

Therefore, wc urge all United Methodists to be - 
come informed about all of the aspects of "Law of the 
Sea," one of the most critical and least understood issues 
of our day. 

Further, we urge all United Methodists to become 
informed about the Law of the Sea, and to call upon 
their governments to commit themselves to the devel - 
opment of a just and equitable implementation of the 
Law of the Sea Treaty, treaty through the United 
Nations Conference on Law of the Sea and to ratification 
of the treaty by our respective governments. 



Petition Number: 2104&-CSR87-U; GBCS. 

U.S. Agriculture and Riu'al Communities 
in Crisis 

Delete "U.S. Agriculture and Rural Communities in 
Crisis," p.87, TTie Book of Resolutions and replace with 
the following new text: 

L Preface 

The United Methodist Church has long wit- 
nessed to rural peoples and their concerns. Each 
Genered Conference since 1940 has suggested re- 
sponses for improving rural church and commu- 
nity life, and the economic and environmental 
well-being of rural peoples. The 1988 General 
Conference accepted a study on U.S. Agriculture 
and Rural Communities in Crisis. This resolution 
reaffirms that study and calls The United Method- 
ist Church to continue its commitment to rural 
chtu'ch ministry and its advocacy for agricultural 
and rural community concerns. 

XL Theological Statement: Land, People & 
Justice 

God is the owner of the land (Lev. 25); thus it 
is a gift in covenant which involves the steward- 
ship of keeping and tending the land for present 
and future generations; as God's creation, land 
has the need to be regenerated that it may sustain 
life and be a place of joy. It is a common gift to all 
of life reqturing just patterns of land use. 

Social, economic, and ecological justice with 
regard to the use of land was central to the Law. 
The land itself was to receive a rest every seven 
years (Lev. 25:4). Voluntary charity or occasional 
care of the land was not enough. Israel's failure to 
follow the laws related to the land was considered 
a cause of the exile to Babylon (2 Chron. 36:21). 
The care of the land, the rights of the poor and 
those in need were at the center of the Law. Ade- 
quate food was regarded as an inherent right of aU, 
such that the poor could eat grapes in a neighbor's 
vineyard or pluck grain when passing by a field 
(DeuL 23:24-25). Owners were urged not to be 
too efficient in their harvest (Lev. 19:9-10), so 
that gleaning by those in need was possible. 

Indeed, the concept of equal access to com- 
munity resources according to need formed the 
basis of the covenant the community was expected 
to embody. The caring for one's neighbor, espe- 
cially one in need, became a religious obligation. 
Jesus both inherits and fulfills this tradition when 
he Usts the commandment to love your neighbor 



Church and Society 



131 



as yourself as second only to the commandment to 
love God (Matt 22:38-40). 

The prophets saw the patterns of economic 
exploitation, social class consciousness, judicial 
corruption, political oppression, failing to care for 
the land, and exclusiveness as opposed to God's 
desire for fiill life and wholeness for all (Amos 2-8; 
Isa 5:1-1, 58:3-7, Jer. 2:7-8; Hos. 4:1-3). Some 
would suggest that both the contemporary world 
and Israel under the monarchy came to worship 
"bigness" more than God. 

Today, rural parts of the globe suffer from 
many of the same maladies as did ancient Israel. 
Land holdings have become more concentrated. 
The accumulation of material wealth often is wor- 
shipped as the solution to other spiritual and eco- 
nomic problems. Creation itself groans under a 
burden of eroding topsoil, toxic wastes, and pol- 
luted waters. Neither the land nor most of the 
people who work it can celebrate the wholeness 
God intended. 

III. Major Findings 
A. The Farm Crisis 

As the adverse economic conditions affecting 
rural America continue to be chronic, the patterns 
of diverse land ownership and control are disap- 
pearing. The structiu"e of agriculture is changing. 
In 1986, the Office of Technology Assessment of 
the U.S. Congress estimated that about 72,000 
farms may be lost each year until the year 2000. 
Most of the farms expected to be lost are family 
sized units. Ethnic-minority-owned and small- 
scale farms will decline further if present trends 
continue. A family farm is defined not by the 
number of acres in operation, but as an agricul- 
tural production unit and business in which the 
management, economic risk, and most of the la- 
bor (except in peak seasons) are provided by the 
family, and from which the family receives a sig- 
nificant part, though not necessarily the majority, 
of its income. 

Declining land values, the relationship be- 
tween farm product prices and incomes, farm debt 
and bankrupteies, forced land transfers and fore- 
closiu-es, changes in the structure of agriculture, 
and tax policy continue to contribute to the loss of 
family farms. 

Black and other minority farmers are even 
less likely than white farmers to benefit from any 
changes in the nu-al/farm economy. According to 
the Federation of Southern Cooperatives/Emer- 
gency Land Fimd, if present land loss continues, 
there will be virtuaUy no black farmers by the year 
2000. Surveys of Native American farmers sug- 
gest that their situation may be nearly as bleak as 



that of black farmers. Farming is the leading occu- 
pation among Native Americans living on reserva- 
tion lands. Asian Americans and Hispanics have 
historically been excluded from significant farm 
ownership. 

Farm workers have difficult and dangerous 
work. Inadequate wages, benefits and living facili- 
ties keep most farm workers in poverty. 

Many farmers have internalized the external 
cause of tiieir losses which has led to deep depres- 
sion, spouse and family abuse, alcoholism, mental 
breakdown, divorce, suicide, participation in ex- 
tremist groups, and at times, miu-der. 

The farm crisis accelerates the loss of nu-al 
community. 

B. Rural Community in Crisis 

The rural United States today is a contrast 
between beauty and desecration, isolation and in- 
dustrialization, wealth and poverty, power and op- 
pression, freedom and exploitation, abundance 
and hunger, and individualism and dependence. 
The nation's poorest housing and healtii facilities 
occur disproportionately in rural communities, as 
do the worst education, the worst roads and trans- 
portation systems, the least progressive justice 
systems, and the greatest poverty and m^utri- 
tion. Towns which not long ago were vibrant com- 
mimities of economic, social and spiritual life now 
have become ghost towns with empty businesses, 
abandoned homes, closed chtu'ches, and broken 
spirits. Broken homes, broken lives, suicides, 
bankrupteies, spouse and child abuse, unemploy- 
ment, substance abuse and related violence, and 
other social catastrophes often make up the local 
news for many nu-al communities. 

C. The Ecological Crisis in Rtu-al Areas 

Much of the rural population of the United 
States depends on ground water from shallow 
wells, many of which are already polluted. The 
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) 
1984 stuvey of nu'al water quality found that al- 
most two-thirds of the supplies tested exceeded 
EPA's drinking water standards for at least one 
contaminant. 

Soil conservation practices such as contotu* 
plowing, crop rotation, wind-breaks, and covering- 
cropping are affected as farmers are pushed to 
farm more and more acres with bigger and bigger 
equipment 

The decline of conservation practices is par- 
alleled by an increase in pesticide and herbicide 
use. While their use brings many benefits, there 



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are still unanswered questions that need to be care- 
fully examined. 

Absentee land ownership and all its short- 
comings are endemic to mining. Restoration of 
mined land continues to be a concern. Studies by 
the Commission on Religion in Appalachia reveal 
that mining interests often pay Utfle heed to resto- 
ration laws, and have the political clout to get away 
with ignoring them. 

The loss of genetic diversity, including the 
consequences of the loss of native seed and ani- 
mal varieties is a concern. 

The genetic engineering of plants and animals 
and die patenting of genes, plants and animals 
raise major concerns. 

IV. The Church Responding to Crisis 

In some areas the chm-ches have been helpful 
in assisting farmers to cope with the loss of their 
farms and in aiding others to help keep their 
farms. Unfortunately, in many cases, churches 
have been ineffective in fiilfiUing this ministry. A 
niunber of reasons have been cited for the chur- 
ch's shortcoming: 

Many church members are still accepting a 
theology that "goodness" means "success," and 
that failure means that God has pxmished the per- 
son for his/her "sins." 

Many clergy are not trained adequately to 
minister to the needs of the hurting families in 
their commtmities. 

In general, clergy are more involved in re- 
sponding to congregational needs than the needs 
of the larger comnumity. 

In many rural areas, churches are still oper- 
ating under an independent rather than a coopera- 
tive model. 

V. A CaU for Change: What Needs To Be Done? 

A. The local churches, charges, and cooperative 
parish ministries, are called to: 

1. Intentionally develop ministries to meet 
major needs that exist today in rural United States 
including: 

a. Take responsibility for assisting with mend- 
ing the brokenness of community life in rm-al so- 
ciety. 

b. Strengthen its ministry and mission with 
rural churches and communities 

c. Lift up the responsible stewardship of natu- 
ral resotu'ces. 



d. Build bridges of understanding and part- 
nership between rural and urban congregations 
and communities. 

2. Implement the recommendations of the 
General Board of Discipleship 1992 study on 
"Strengthening the Small Membership Church." 

B. The districts are called to: 

1. Develop and or strengthen their missional 
stance in rural areas. 

2. Create cluster groups and other supportive 
networks within the district to faciUtate spiritual 
formation. 

3. Encourage cooperative leadership through 
more creative use of available personnel and ap- 
propriate technology. 

C. Annual conferences are called to: 

1. Analyze their rural crisis response and pro- 
vide funding for an effective and ongoing re- 
sponse. 

2. Place personnel strategically in order to 
respond to rural needs. Insist that pastoral ap- 
pointments be made with the needs of entire com- 
mimities in mind, and not just the needs of the 
congregation. 

3. Become public policy advocates, speaking 
out as a Church, creating awareness and imder- 
standing, and in bringing about positive change. 

4. Cooperate with other chiu"ch and secular 
agencies in a rural response. 

5. Be in partnership with seminaries to de- 
velop programs, including "teaching" parishes 
and internships, to equip ministers to serve in 
rural £ireas. 

6. Develop programs to invest conference 
foundation funds in rural economic development 
needs. 

7. Discover ways to enable the ethnic owner- 
ship of farmland. 

8. Model and support the team ministry con- 
cept at every level, including cluster groups and 
other supportive networks to facilitate spiritual 
formation. 

9. Develop programs for volunteers-in-mis- 
sion in rural areas. 

10. Encoiu^e sustainable agricultural prac- 
tices by United Methodist femily-owned farms. 

D. The general Church is called to: 



Church and Society 



133 



1. Use its seminaries to prepare clergy to be 
more effective pastors in rural areas, using the 
"missionary training" model, knowing that many 
ministers not accustomed to rural life enter into 
an area where there is a new "language," a new 
lifestyle, a new culture. 

2. Cooperate ecumenically and with other 
groups to develop responses to the problems of 
rural areas. 

3. Better learn the skills of personnel place- 
ment, so that appointed ministers in rural areas 
will have a long enough tenure to build trust/un- 
derstanding relationships necessary for becoming 
pastors to the community. Place more mission 
(and similar) personnel in rural ministries. 

4. Recognize Rural life Sunday as a special 
day in the chiwch year, combining in the one day 
the emphases of Riu"al life Sunday, Soil Steward- 
ship Day, Earth Day, World Environment Day and 
Rogation Sunday. 

5. Provide opportunities for U.S. and Third 
World farmers to share innovations and knowl- 
edge. 

6. Carefully analyze and monitor all church 
agencies' programs to insure sensitivity to the pre- 
sent rural crisis. 

7. Emphasize, in all appropriate Uteratiu^e and 
training programs, the importance of soil steward- 
ship and ecology as a part of total Christian Stew- 
ardship. Greneral agencies should report annually 
on their stewardship of farm and rural lands they 
own. 

8. Consider using a significant portion of the 
investment funds of all Church agencies for invest- 
ment in local-church-based community economic 
development in rural areas. 

9. Urge all church agencies to continue to 
promote the cooperative style of ministry, espe- 
cially cooperative parish ministries, as a model of 
God's desire for life in community. 

10. Aggressively research corporate owner- 
ship of agriculture and its effects upon life in rural 
areas, and advocate necessary responses based 
upon the findings of this research. 

11. Request that the General Board of Disci- 
pleship Curriculum Resoiu"ces Committee peri- 
odicalty develop curriculum resoiu-ces on the is- 
sues raised in this resolution, in coordination with 
the General Board of Church and Society and the 
General Board of Global Ministries, and make 
such materials available to aU chiu'ches. 



12. Call upon the General Board of Church 
and Society and the General Board of Global Min- 
istries to develop other materials to interpret this 
resolution. 

E. Bishops are called to: 

1. Work toward longer term rural appoint- 
ments (with a goal of a minimum of 4 years) of 
clergy leadership to provide more stability in nu-al 
areas. 

2. Foster cooperative styles of leadership in 
rural churches by more creative use of available 
ministerial personnel and appropriate technology. 

F. Federal legislators and administrators, as they 

develop farm and nu-al policies are called to: 

1 . Develop poUcies that will enable farm fami- 
lies to receive a just return for their labor and 
investments. These new policies would: 

a. Reverse the loss of family farms. 

b. Provide for credit to family farmers at af- 
fordable interest rates. 

c. Develop a marketing and government sup- 
port system that will guarantee the cost of produc- 
tion to farm families. 

d. Initiate participatory democratic processes 
with farmers to determine if mandatory produc- 
tion goals, which would discourage over-produc- 
tion of some commodities, are needed to move 
toward a balance between supply and demand. 

e. Greatly reduce government payments to 
large corporate farming interests. 

f. Create programs that would enable new 
families to enter farming as vocation. 

g. Create incentives for family farmers to shift 
from ciurent production-oriented modes to a sus- 
tainable and regenerative agriculture. 

h. Ensure the participation of family farmers 
regardless of race and sex. 

2. Discourage concentration in ownership and 
control of land and money and move toward land 
reforms that broaden ownership of land. 

3. Require soil and water conservation prac- 
tices for farm operations which participate in fed- 
eral programs; include farmers in the planning of 
such requirements. 

4. Reduce the federal deficit without burden- 
ing family farms. 



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5. Reform federal tax laws to remove unfair 
competition and discourage tax shelter motivated 
capital in agriculture. 

6. Maintain an emphasis on direct loan activ- 
ity, resist attempts to reduce the level of direct 
loans in favor of guarantees, and increase the Lim- 
ited Resources Loan program for qualified £arm- 



7. Provide for commodity reserves, isolated 
from the market, to be established at a level ade- 
quate to protect constmiers from supply disrup- 
tion and meet domestic agricultural disaster and 
global humanitarian food aid requirements. 

8. Ensxu*e that most federally-supported pro- 
grams of research and education in agriculture 
focus on small and medium-sized family farm op- 
erations, with special attention paid to minority 
farmers, and that county committees, which ad- 
minister these programs, be inclusive of women 
and minority farmers. 

9. Fund major new research initiatives and 
programs through the federal land grant institu- 
tions, including black land grant colleges, to en- 
siu'e that development of long-term, sustainable 
and regenerative agriculture. 

10. Develop farm policies that will encourage 
farm owned and controlled businesses and coop- 
eratives for processing, distributing and market- 
ing farm products. 

1 1 . Develop policies that will respect the guar- 
anteed land and water rights of all minority peo- 
ples. 

12. Develop and support programs in coop- 
eration with community-based organizations to 
improve the quahty of life in depressed rural ar- 
eas, with attention given to healtii care, transpor- 
tation, education, employment, law enforcement, 
housing, job training, and environmental protec- 
tion. 

13. Develop national and regional water and 
energy pohcies wiiich asstu'e that those who bene- 
fit from energy and water projects pay a substan- 
tial portion of those costs. 

14. Recognize and protect the right of farm 
workers to organize into iinions of their own 
choosing, be covered by minimum wage laws, and 
receive adequate benefits, including social secu- 
rity, health care, and unemployment. 

15. Discourage exports policies that would 
hurt small farm agricultiu'e in developing coun- 
tries and hinder efforts toward food self-sufS- 
ciency in those countries. 



16. Prohibit the importation of produce con- 
taining residues of pesticides or other chemicals 
that are banned for U.S. producers and revise 
permitted residue levels when the pesticide is 
banned. 

17. Urge the federal government to declare 
moratorituns on foreclostu'es in states where lend- 
ers are participating in debt restructure or media- 
tion programs. 

18. Seek out international cooperation in de- 
veloping an international food policy. 

G. State governments are caUed to: 

1. Develop systems of mediation to resolve 
conflicts between borrower and lender. 

2. Develop and enforce fair and just tax sys- 
tems that ensiu"e that those with great wealth and 
poUtical power pay their fair share of taxes. 

3. Enstu'e that state subsidies for water benefit 
small and medium-sized operations. 

4. Protect security of farm products stored by 
farmers in elevators. 

5. Develop and support farmers' markets and 
marketing cooperatives. 

6. Pay special attention to the education and 
relocation of jobless persons, conunit state re- 
soxu-ces to the estabUshment of industries or agen- 
cies that will increase the job/tax base, and main- 
tenance of an acceptable quaUty of social services 
for all. 

7. Allocate funds to monitor all state programs 
and economic development projects for their im- 
pact upon the socio-economic and natural envi- 
ronment 

8. Urge the development and maintenance of 
conservation programs that supplement federal 
progremis and environmental standards that ex- 
ceed federal minimums. 

9. Sell bonds to help farmers sectu"e low-inter- 
est loans, with special attention given to minority 
farmers and others witii similar needs. Assist 
such families in identifying and seciuing loans 
from such soiu-ces. 

10. Assure that state marketing regulations 
benefit small and medium-sized operators. 

11. Ensxu-e that most state-supported pro- 
grams of research and education in agriculture 
focus on small-£md-medium-sized family farm op- 
erations, with special attention paid to minority 
fanners. 



Church and Society 



135 



12. Fund major research initiatives and pro- 
grams through state and/or corporate grants to 
ensure the development of long-term, sustainable, 
and regenerative agriculture. 

H. Government and private lending agencies 
are called to: 

1. Continue to restructure existing loans to 
allow for lower payments over a longer period of 
time, and with lower interest rates, as agreed to by 
lender and borrower through a mediation process. 

2. Require the U.S. Department of Agriculture 
and other lending agencies to have more balanced 
and consistent lending policies and practices, and 
to assess fairly the spending of authorized funds 
on farm operations. 

3. Urge the U.S. government to change accoimting 
procedures to allow banks that peirticipate in debt 
restructure agreements to write off any potential 
losses over a ten-year period. 

4. Give priority for purchases to minority fore- 
closed, beginning and re-entering farmers when 
foreclosed land is offered for sale. 

I. Local government and commimity groups are 
called to: 

1 . Develop land use and land reclamation poli- 
cies, supported by adequate funding, to preserve 
productive farmlands. 

2. Organize and support local groups to pro- 
vide legal aid, financial advice, counseling and 
other support service for rural persons. 

3. Monitor programs to assure that all commu- 
nity planning is ecologically soxmd, socially re- 
sponsible, and includes persons of color and 
women. 

4. Foster a positive community spirit with a 
variety of local programs that enhance tiie commu- 
nity members' well-being and self-worth. 

5. Develop and support measures that ensure 
a fair tax treatment of all in the community. 

6. Support the development of local programs 
to meet such special needs as better housing, 
health care, transportation, and recreation. 

7. Develop local representative, long-range 
planning committees to monitor and advise 
elected or appointed ofBcials, and community 
groups. 

8. Cooperate with state agencies to develop 
policies so that farmers markets in their commu- 



nities may be able to accept food stamps and WIC 
certificates for purchases. 

J. Multinational, national, and local business 
groups are called to: 

1 . Examine their corporate policy in relation- 
ship to an understanding of and responsiveness to 
the values of rural lifestyles represented by 
smaller farm size units. 

2. Implement just policies concerning the etii- 
ics of research; short-term and long-term ecologi- 
cal effects; conservation of resources; water and 
energy use; local, national, and export marketing; 
labor use; and the availability and access to financ- 
ing and credit 

The More DiEBcult Task 

The more difBcult task for the Chiu"ch is to 
take clearly and intentionally the prophetic role. 
The Church has a clear record of helping the world 
address such issues as clean water and air, civil 
rights, nuclear warfare, arms expenditures, and 
world hunger. The Church must likewise take re- 
sponsibility for addressing the problem of agricul- 
ture. The outcome of human history will be deter- 
mined by our resolve to achieve a favorable future 
for agriculture. 

Unless we change some basic directions, we 
are not just in a period of transition; we are headed 
for disaster for all nations. Some basic directions 
that must be changed include: 

— ^The movement toward investor-owned land 
in increasingly larger corporate units; the separa- 
tion of ownership, management, and labor. 

— ^The increased reliance upon high inputs of 
non-renewable resources such as fossil fuels and 
chemicals. 

— ^The continued decline in rural populations 
from nu'al areas, especially those who have been 
directly involved in food production. 

— ^The increasing chemical toxicity of oiu- water 
systems, air, rain, waste dumps and vegetable and 
animal products. 

— The continuing loss of cropland through ero- 
sion, salinization, urbanization, conversion, and 
other processes. 

— ^The disappearance of world forest re- 
sources, and changing weather patterns residting 
from that. 

— ^The loss of atmospheric ozone. 



136 



DCA Advance Edition 



— The continuing and growing use of the 
world's basic resoiu-ces for armaments. 

— The loss of our centuries-old genetic seed 
bank. 

Three Ethical Guidelines 

We can change the direction of agricidture and 
rural development, but we need guidelines. A pre- 
ferred agriculture must have three attributes: 

(1) It must be just. A just society and a just 
agriculture provides the means whereby people 
can share in the inheritance of the earth so that all 
life can fully be maintained in freedom and com- 
mtmity. The piupose of a just agricidture should 
be for the maintenance and renewal of the neces- 
sary resources for food, clothing and shelter, for 
now and for the future. 

(2) It must be participatory. For an agriculture 
to be just everyone has the right to be consulted. 
Participation in society and in the ongoing process 
of creation is the necessary condition for justice. 
Participation requires a recognition of everyone's 
right to be consulted and xmderstood, regardless 
of that person's economic, political, or social 
status. Participation is not possible without 
power. In such decision-making everyone has the 
right to be consulted about such issues as expen- 
ditures for armaments, nuclear power, forms of 
employment, social services, etc... 

(3) It must be sustainable. A sustainable agri- 
culture is one where the idea of permanent carry- 
ing capacity is maintained, where yields (agricul- 
ture, energy production, forestry, water use, 
industrial activity) are measured by whether or not 
they are sustainable, rather than by the criteria of 
yields per acre or profits. In a sustainable agricid- 
ture waste products can be absorbed back into the 
ecosystem without damage. 

A just, participatory and sustainable agricul- 
ture would meet basic human needs for food and 
fiber, regenerate and protect ecosystems, be eco- 
nomically viable, enhance the quality of life for 
farm families, be supportive of rural communities, 
be socially just, and be compatible witii spiritual 
teachings that recognize the eardi as a common 
heritage and responsibility. For Christians, the 
idea of sustainabiUty flows directly from the bibh- 
cal call to human beings to be stewards of God's 
creation. 



The Nurturing Community 

Petition Number: 20032-CS-NonDis-O;WIS, WYO, 

NEB. 

Use of the Church Studies on Homosexuality 

Whereas, our Social Principles state: "We recognize 
that sexuality is God's good gift to all persons. We 
believe persons may be fully human only when that gift 
is acknowledged and affirmed by themselves, the 
Church, and society. We call all persons to the disci- 
plined, responsible fulfillment of themselves, others, 
and society in the stewardship of this gift. We also 
recognize our limited un derstanding of this complex gift 
and encourage the medical, theological, and social sci- 
ence disciplines to combine in a determined effort to 
understand human sexuality more completely. We call 
the Church to take the leadership role in bringing to- 
gether these disciplines to address this most complex 
issue. Further, within the context of our understanding 
of this gift of God, we recognize that God challenges us 
to find responsible, committed, and loving forms of 
expression" % 71F; and 

Whereas, the Committee to Study Homosexuality 
provided a meaningful model and process of study, 
prayer, reflection, and action of a complex and signifi- 
cant issue facing United Methodists; and 

Whereas, the study resource includes stories of 
individuals struggling and growing, sharing their under- 
standing of faithfulness to the mind of Christ; and 

Whereas, the use of these materials expands our 
spiritual growth in understanding God's good gift of 
human sexuality; and 

Whereas, perceptions and perspectives of individu- 
als continue to benefit from open and informed discus- 
sion about homosexuality; 

Therefore, be it resolved, that the Annual Confer- 
ences are urged to support the use of this study; and 

Be it resolved, that the Council of Bishops is encour- 
aged to use the study; and 

Be it further resolved, that the Board of Discipleship 
facilitate the use of the study in Church School, retreat, 
distinct Council on Ministry, and other settings. 



Petition Number: 20858-CS-NonDis-O; Metiiodist Fed- 
eration For Social Action, CPA Harrisburg, PA 

Use of "The Church Studies Homosexuality" 

Whereas, our Social Principles state: 

We recognize that sexuality is God's good gift to all 
persons. We believe persons may be fully human only 
when that gift is acknowledged and affirmed by them- 
selves, the Church, and society. We call all persons to 



Church and Society 



137 



the disciplined, responsible fulfillment of themselves, 
others, and society in the stewardship of this gift. We 
also recognize our limited understanding of this com- 
plex gift and encourage the medical, theological, and 
social science disciplines to combine in a determined 
effort to understand human sexuality more completely. 
We call the Church to take the leadership role in bring- 
ing together these disciplines to address this most com- 
plex issue. Further, within the context of our under- 
standing of this gift of God, we recognize that God 
challenges us to find responsible, committed, and loving 
forms of expressions. 

And whereas, the Committee to Study Homosexu- 
ality provided a meaningful model and process of study, 
prayer, reflection, and action of a complex and signifi- 
cant issue facing United Methodists; and 

Whereas, the study resource includes stories of 
individuals struggling and growing, sharing their under- 
standing of faithfubess to the mind of Christ; and 

Whereas, the use of these materials expands our 
spiritual growth in understanding God's good gift of 
human sexuality; and 

Whereas, perceptions and perspectives of individu- 
als continue to benefit from open and informed discus- 
sion about homosexuality; 

Therefore, be it resolved, that the annual confer- 
ences are urged to support the use of this study; and 

Be it further resolved, that the Council of Bishops 
is encouraged to use the study; and 

Be it further resolved, that the General Board of 
Discipleship facilitate the use of the study in church 
school, retreats, district Council on Ministries and other 
settings. 



Petition Number: 20155-CS-R125-U;NGA 

Responsible Parenthood: Abortion 

Amend "Responsible Parenthood", The Book of 
Resolutions, p. 125-128, by adding the following sentence 
at the end of the 4th paragraph, before the last sentence 
of the 5th paragraph, and at the end of proposals 7 and 
9: 

We cannot affirm abortion as an acceptable 
means of birth control and we unconditionally re- 
ject it as a means of gender selection. 

The Social Community 

Petition Number: 20157-CS-NonDis-O;NGA. 

Organizations Connected to Abortion Matters 

Many in The United Methodist Church feel 
strongly that the right of woman to choose is to be 



supported by laws and governmental actions such as 
counseling and funding abortion. Others are deeply 
pained by the huge quantity of fetal death; they feel 
strongly that the life of the fetus is sacred and should be 
protected by laws and governmental actions. Those who 
feel strongly on these matters have created organiza- 
tions which lobby governments to favor their point of 
view. These organizations are often in conflict, present- 
ing opposing positions. We believe that the General 
Boards and Agencies of The United Methodist Church 
should not hold membership in these organizations. 
Neither should they grant funds obtained fi^om appor- 
tionments to support abortion caucuses or groups, or 
otherwise use such funds to promote one position over 
another. 

Neither should our General Boards and Agencies 
give in-kind support, such as secretarial support or office 
services and space. We should instead be sensitive to 
the pain that exists in these matters and recognize that 
loyal members are hurt when they are asked to support 
the total work of the Church, yet see some portion, 
however small, spent in opposition to positions they 
believe are vital to Christian faith. 



We encourage local congregations, and also annual 
conferences, to participate in these organizations 
when apportioned funds are not involved and suffi- 
cient dialogue has resulted in substantial agreement 
on ministry activity. We encourage dialogue among 
our members and our General Boards and Agencies 
to the end that we may be agents of reconciliation in 
these matters. We hope that fetal death can be re- 
duced and the rights of women can be protected. 
Surely we can pray and work together to find such a 
way without exerting power over others, causing 
them great pain. 



Petition Number: 20029-CS-NonDis-O;WYO,TRY, 
RKM, NYK, NIL. 

Clinic Violence eiround Reproductive Rights 

Whereas, faithful and conscientious persons hold 
widely different convictions concerning abortion; 

Whereas, some opponents of abortion have publicly 
postulated a "justifiable homicide" rationale for killing 
abortion providers; 

Whereas, murder is a sin; 

Whereas, violence is a sin; 

Whereas, escalation of attacks on abortion clinics 
resulting in the murder of doctors, clinic office workers, 
and visitors constitutes domestic terrorism; 

Whereas, escalation of rhetoric on all sides contin- 
ues to push people apart and make useful dialogue 
around common ground issues difficult; 



138 



DCA Advance Edition 



Whereas, this increase of violence, both in attitude 
and acts of physical violence, calls all of us to repentance; 

Therefore, be it resolved, that The United Method- 
ist Church: 

Repent of violence, turn toward attitudes of respect, 
and seek areas of common ground between those who 
call themselves pro-life and those who call themselves 
pro-choice; 

Reject and condemn the use of violence against 
providers of legal services related to reproductive 
health; 



Encourage local churches, annual conferences, and 
General Conference agencies to speak out whenever 
such violence occurs. 



Petition Number: 20248-CSNonDis-O;EPA 

Opposition to Abusive Treatment of Persons 
with Mental Disabilities 

Whereas, a large part of the ministry of our Lord 
focused on persons with mental disabilities; and 

Whereas, persons with mental disabilities are chil- 
dren of God and are therefore our brothers and sisters 
within the human family; and 

Whereas, the full and equal rights of persons with 
mental disabilities are enshrined in the Social Principles 
of The United Methodist Church, as well as the Consti- 
tution and laws of the United States of America; and 

Whereas, we note that the use of abusive treatment 
as "therapy" for persons with mental disabiUties still 
occurs in the Untied States, and that such abusive treat- 
ment is used on both adults and children, and that 
programs which rely on such abusive treatments are 
usually funded by federal, state, and/or local tax reve- 
nues; and 

Whereas, a number of organizations which advo- 
cate for persons with mental disabilities have already 
taken stands against abusive treatment; 

Therefore, be it resolved, that The United Method- 
ist Church affirms the right of persons with disabilities 
to freedom from abusive treatment. 

Be it further resolved, that The United Methodist 
Church opposes the use of any form of punishment for 
children or adults with mental disabilities in any case 
where such punishment would be considered illegal, 
abusive, or unconscionable if applied to a child or adult 
who is not disabled, hi particular, we condemn as unac- 
ceptable the following practices: 

1. Treatments which result in physical injury or 
tissue damage to the person. 



2. Verbal abuse or insult, humiUation, or degrada- 
tion. 

3. Denial of food, warmth, hygiene, contact with 
other human beings, or other necessities of life. 

4. The use of electric shock or noxious substances 
as a form of punishment. 

5. The use of any punishment on a child with mental 
disabilities that would be considered child abuse if used 
on a child with no disabilities. 

6. Neglect 

7. The use of physical or chemical restraint when 
the individual or others are not in danger of physical 
harm. 

8. The threat of any of the above treatments. 

Any therapy used in the treatment of persons with 
mental disabilities must be potentially beneficial to the 
person. As an alternative to abusive treatments, we sup- 
port the use of positive approaches in the treatment of 
persons with mental disabilities. Positive approaches 
affirm the humanity of persons with mental disabilities 
and recognize that the needs and desires of such per- 
sons are not significantly different from those of other 
persons. Our obligation to persons with mental disabili- 
ties is to support and assist them in their efforts to live 
lives as rich and rewarding as possible. 

Be it further resolved, that we call upon all public 
and private agencies and service providers involved in 
providing services to persons with mental disabilities to 
adopt and uphold the standards set forth in this resolu- 
tion. 

Be it further resolved, that we call upon all federal, 
state, and local governments to end immediately the 
expenditure of public revenues on any agency or pro- 
gram which faUs to adopt and uphold the standards set 
forth in this resolution. 



Be it further resolved, that The United Methodist 
Church declares itself to be open to persons with men- 
tal disabilities and their families, commits itself to sup- 
port such persons and families and accommodate 
their needs within our community. We further pledge 
our support to help persons with mental disabilities 
and their families find appropriate services, programs, 
and supports, and to protect them from abusive treat- 
ments. 



Petition Number: 20260-CS-NonDis-O;ORI. 

Rights of All Persons 

Around the world, political and religious groups 
attempt to mandate discrimination against gay and les- 



Church and Society 



139 



bian persons through local and national legislative initia- 
tives. We feel called as Christians to reconfirm our 
resistance to the strategies and intent of such groups. 
These groups falsely portray the basic human rights of 
equal opportunity, access to redress for harm, and jus- 
tice as "special rights" in the case of gay and lesbian 
persons. 

This legal, systemic attack results in persecution 
and suffering. The legislative initiatives effectively limit 
freedom of speech, freedom of inquiry, and access to 
health care for persons with HIV/ AIDS. This endeavor 
to isolate and discriminate against gay, lesbian, and 
bisexual persons as a group within our society hurts 
them and diminishes the rights of all. It must be stopped 
now. 

It is particularly disturbing when religious values 
are used as a foundation for persecution of select groups 
of people. This process has characterized some of the 
church's bleakest history: the Crusades, Inquisition, 
Pogroms, Slavery, and the Holocaust. It is crucially 
important that Christians insist that all people are God's 
children who deserve the protection of their human and 
civil rights. 

The Social Principles statement of the United Meth- 
odist Book of Discipline gives us clear direction in the 
matter: 

"We insist that all persons, regardless of age, gen- 
der, marital status, or sexual orientation, are entitled to 
have their human and civil rights ensured." (^ 71.F) 

'The rights and privileges a society bestows upon 
or withholds from those who comprise it indicate the 
relative esteem in which that society holds particular 
persons and groups of persons. We affirm all persons as 
equally valuable in the sight of God. We therefore work 
toward societies in which each person's value is recog- 
nized, maintained, and strengthened." CB 72) 

Therefore, all United Methodists are called upon: 

1. To refrain from signing petitions and to vote 
against measures which advocate the denial of basic 
human and civil rights to anyone; 

2. To educate congregation and community alike 
about the position of the United Methodist Discipline on 
civil rights and its broad applications; 

3. To stand against any political or physical acts that 
deny human and civil rights and the sacred worth of all 
persons. 



We do this as part of our Christian witness and minis- 
try. Never let it be said that United Methodists were si- 
lent during this attack on the rights of all. 



Petition Number: 20857-CS-NonDis-O; Metiiodist Fed- 
eration for Social Action, CPA, Harrisburg, PA 

Clinic Violence 

Whereas, faithful and conscientious persons hold 
widely different convictions concerning abortion; and 

Whereas, some opponents of abortion have publicly 
postulated a "justifiable homicide" rationale for killing 
abortion providers; and 

Whereas, murder is a sin; and 

Whereas, violence is a sin; and 

Whereas, escalation of attacks on abortion clinics 
resulting in the murder of doctors, clinic officers, work- 
ers, and visitors constitutes domestic terrorism; and 

Whereas, escalation of rhetoric on all sides contin- 
ues to push people apart and make useful dialogue 
around common ground issues difficult; and 

Whereas, this increase of violence, both in attitude 
and acts of physical violence calls all of us to repentance; 

Therefore, be it resolved, that The United Method- 
ist Church: 

• repent of violence, turn toward attitudes of respect, 
and seek areas of common ground between those 
who call themselves pro-life and those who call 
themselves pro-choice; 

• reject and condemn the use of violence against 
providers of legal services related to productive 
health; 

• encourage local churches, annual conferences, and 
General Conference agencies to speak out 
whenever such violence occurs. 



Petition Number: 21038-CS-NonDis-O; GBCS. 

God's Msion of Abundant Living 

All creation has been brought into being by God 
who "saw everything that God had made, and behold it 
was very good" (Genesis 1:31). All creation declares 
God's handiwork; everything exists in an intricate web 
of interdependence, and all this is given value and 
blessed by God (Genesis 1). 

The initial and foundational value of all creation 
comes from its being the handiwork of God. God seeks 
the salvation, healing, and reconciliation of all crea- 
tion — "God so loved the world, that he sent his only 
son..." Gohn 3:16). In "Jesus Christ, God was pleased to 
reconcile to himself all things whether on earth or in 
heaven through making peace through the blood of the 
cross" (Colossians 1:20). 



140 



DCA Advance Edition 



Through the divine creation and incarnation of God 
in Christ, we see the world as a loving creation — a 
creation intimate with its creator. It is through this 
intimacy with God, through Jesus Christ, that we find 
our value and our worth. 

The whole of creation contains all that is necessary 
to sustain itself and is an indication of God's affection 
and desire for re-creation. 

We are people called to live toward God's vision of 
reconciliation through Christ Jesus. This reconciled 
world, or "new heaven and earth" (Revelation 21), in- 
cludes creation healed — a creation where diversity is 
celebrated as a gift, rather than resisted and destroyed; 
where loving relationships are supremely valued and the 
resources of the world are shared equitably and justly; 
where all persons know their worth and value as chil- 
dren of God who seek the well-being of God's Creation 
above their own greed. 

It is a world where we live out of a theology of 
"enough," a theology based in knowledge that we are 
grounded in Christ; that our sense of personal value and 
esteem grow from our Christ-centered life. It is a theol- 
ogy that allows us to move away from worshipping the 
gods of consumption and material need. 

In living out a theology of "enough" we will no 
longer expend our physical resources in consumption 
and our emotional resources in worrying over status. 
Our security and sense of well-being will be defined in 
relationship to God, not by our possessions. We will 
center our lives around God. 

We hear a reminder of this style of living throughout 
Jesus' teachings: "Do not worry what we will eat, what 
we will drink or what we will wear. For it is the Gentiles 
who strive for all these things; and indeed God knows 
that you need all these things. But, strive first for the 
kingdom of God and God's righteousness and all these 
things will be given to you as well" (Matthew 6:31). 
While Christ does not seek for any of us to be without 
basic necessities, a simplified life will move us away from 
the expectations and injustices of affluent living. Abun- 
dant living is a life of greater simplicity, of more respon- 
sible use of resources and of a deeper faith. 

Jesus discusses the foolishness of the rich and the 
greed that builds treasures on the earth. He admonishes 
us to build treasures in heaven, so that we might keep 
ourselves pure in heart and faithful to God (Luke 12). 

In the "new heaven and new earth" we will choose 
a just lifestyle and share our wealth with the poor be- 
cause we no longer need "things" to give us worth. With 
a theology of "enough," we will find gracious and fulfilled 
living in meeting our own basic needs and those of 
others. We will truly be "keepers" and "doers" of God's 
word. 



A Corrupted Vision of Abundant living: 

There is a conflict between what abundant living 
means for a Christian and what it has come to mean in 
secular society. In secular society abundant living is 
defined by one's aspiration to purchase an endless 
number of things, far more than is needed. Secular 
abundant living is experienced when one desires to live 
in luxury with every whim satisfied. This type of abun- 
dant living creates a system where the wealthy consume 
a disproportionate amount of resources and produce a 
disproportionate amount of waste. This living is rooted 
in a consumerism that exploits natiu^al resources, exac- 
erbates global resource crises, and causes cycles of 
global poverty which often lead to local and international 
violence. 

Hearing these facts often raises feelings of guilt, 
anger and denial. The false hope that technology will 
find fixes for all problems leads us to believe that change 
is not necessary. We who live in a culture of consumer- 
ism believe we have earned and deserved all of what we 
have, we do not want to give up anything. Our "things" 
give us a misguided status, a false sense of security and 
a distorted sense of self worth. 

If we fail to believe in our hearts that our worth 
comes from our relationship to Christ and that we are 
called to bring God's redeeming love to creation through 
our actions and lifestyles, then all the arguments and 
information on the global crisis will be ignored. We will 
care about our impact on creation when we each recog- 
nize that creation is a gift given by a loving God for the 
benefit of all life. Only then will we assess how our 
lifestyles (what we do, use, buy, wear, eat, live in and 
travel in) affect all present and future life. 

We have a choice: we can be sustainers or exploiters 
of creation. 

Visions of Faithful Abundant Living on Earth: 

- Abundant living is when all people have their basic 
needs met for food, shelter and good health. 

- Abundant living occurs when all have meaningful 
and fulfilling work that contributes to the common good 
of all others. 

- Abundant living is providing not only for the needs 
of this generation, but for ones to come. 

- Abundant living is found in having time for family 
and community Ufe. 

- Abundant living produces an environment where 
children are valued, cared for, and nurtured in families 
and communities. 

- Abundant living is a lifestyle that protects the 
diversity of all creation. 



Church and Society 



141 



- Abundant living is based on spiritual principles, 
which results in unity, sharing, mutual respect and ap- 
preciation. 

- Abundant living is found in a church that nurtures 
growth and a deepening relationship with God through 
Christ. 

Abundant livingToward Redemption 
anoRenewal: 

The United Methodist Church is called to help find 
opportunities for individuals to reevaluate their sense of 
value and to center their lives and lifestyles around God, 
rather than consumption of material things. The follow- 
ing are steps to assist The United Methodist Church in 
responding to its call: 

United Methodist Congregations: 

Local congregations will reclaim the Spirit of sacri- 
ficial discipleship through networks and abundant living 
communities. These will nurture the conversion of peo- 
ple in local communities through study, lifestyle assess- 
ment and nurture of spiritual life. (The General Board 
of Church and Society can suggest resources) 

General Board of Church and Society: 

The General Board of Church and Society, working 
with the General Council on Ministries, will assist Gen- 
eral Agencies, Boards and Councils and Annual Confer- 
ences to assess their patterns of consumption (including 
but not limited to facility use, travel, compensation pack- 
ages, and purchase of reusable materials). 

General Boeu-d of Discipleship: 

The General Board of Discipleship, with support of 
the General Board of Church and Society, will develop 
ways of assisting persons (especially those who have 
experienced programs such as the Disciple Bible Study 
or other Bible study programs) to reassess personal 
lifestyles with the goal of a conversion to a more simple, 
less consumptive lifestyle and to a greater sensitivity to 
each person's decision-making responsibility in relation 
to national and global social, environmental, and eco- 
nomic problems. 

General Board of Global Ministries: 

The General Board of Global Ministries will look at 
the models of development taught to and by World and 
National Division partners and assess these models' 
roots in the culture of consumerism. The Women's 
Division shall include the focus of Abundant Living in 
the Schools of Christian Mission. 

Council of Bishops: 

The General Board of Church and Society will work 
with episcopal leaders to increase their awareness and 



modeling of abundant living and support their commit- 
ment to ministries to and with the poor of the world. 

The General Board of Higher Education 
and Ministiy: 

The General Board of Higher Education and Ministry 
will work with United Methodist seminaries and 
schools to provide education to promote individual 
conversion to a simplified lifestyle. 



Petition Number: 21040-CSNonDis-O; GBCS. 

Immigrants in the United States: Ministries 
of Hospitality, Advocacy and Justice 

Our Christian roots are centered among people who 
were sojourners in the land. Throughout history, people 
have been uprooted under conditions similar to that of 
Mary and Joseph who were forced to flee to save the life 
of their son. Most of our own forefathers and foremoth- 
ers were immigrants to this country. The Bible is clear 
about how we should treat these wanderers. 

When strangers sojourn with you in your land, you 
shall not do them wrong. The strangers who sojourn with 
you shall be to you as the natives among you, and you shall 
love them as yourself, for you were strangers in the land of 
Egypt (Lev. 19:33-34). 

Communities throughout our world are suffering 
from war, civil conflict and persecution for political, 
religious, ethnic or social reasons. The World Council 
of Churches reports that two out of every 100 human 
beings are fleeing their country, and many families are 
forcibly displaced within their own countries. For these 
reasons we stand firmly opposed to legislative action 
such as that proposed in California's Proposition 187 or 
any similar legislation that may have the following ef- 
fects: 

Public Schools: districts are required to verify the 
legal status of students enrolling for the first time. The 
status of parents or guardians of students must also be 
verified; 

Higher Education: undocumented immigrants 
are barred from community colleges and public institu- 
tions of higher learning; 

Health: undocumented immigrants are ineligible 
for public health services except for emergency care; 

Welfare: undocumented immigrants are already 
ineligible for the major welfare programs. Most child 
welfare and foster care benefits are also eliminated; 

Law Enforcement Service providers are required 
to report suspected undocumented immigrants. Law 
enforcement agencies must verify the residency status 
of individuals arrested or suspected of being in the 
United States illegally. When legal residency cannot be 



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DCA Advance Edition 



proved, the person will be reported to the United States 
Immigration and Naturalization Service; 

With grace and concern, the Church must address 
the legal, economic, social and human rights conditions 
of people who are legal or undocumented immigrants, 
and to oppose the introduction of legislation by any state 
that would cause human suffering and a denial of such 
individual's rights as interpreted through our biblical 
understanding of God's grace to all peoples, but espe- 
cially to the Sojourner. Our faith, grounded in Christ and 
in the Wesleyan call to work for prophetic justice, calls 
us to follow our Social Principles and respond in appro- 
priate and direct ways to prevent harm to the sojourner. 

Jesus teaches us to show special concern for the 
poor and oppressed who come to our land seeking 
survival and peace. We call upon United Methodists 
individually and through general boards and agencies 
throughout The United Methodist Church to do the 
following: 

• Actively oppose anti-immigrant legislative action 
and support legislative action that protects the poor 
and oppressed in their quest for survival and peace; 

• Advocate human rights (political, economic and 
civil) for all people, including the strangers who 
sojourn in our land; 

• Support communities and congregations by prayer 
and action where anti-immigrant measures may be 
implemented; 

• Continue to work with community organizations to 
provide forums for citizens to voice concerns, 
educate one another and confront the problems of 
racism as obstacles to building community; 

• Continue to work with civic and legal organizations 
to support communities who are now or will be 
affected by the destructive, deteriorating social 
issues raised by anti-immigrant measures; 



Finally, we call upon United Methodists to practice 
hospitality and express our commitment to an inclu- 
sive church and society through all our ministries in 
the spirit of our biblical tradition. Do not oppress an 
alien; you yourselves know how it feels to be aliens, be- 
cause you were aliens in Egypt (Exodus 23:9). 



Petition Number: 21126-CS-NonDis-0$;WNC. 

Denominational Office and Director 
of Prison Ministry 

Whereas, The Western North Carolina Conference 
has worked faithfully in prison ministry and prison re- 
form for over twenty-five years; and 



Whereas, The Western North Carolina Conference 
has initiated and supported expansion of this ministry 
over the past five years through the establishment of 
Criminal Justice and Mercy Ministries of The United 
Methodist Church; and 

Whereas, the Western North Carolina Conference- 
sponsored CJAMM has affected many other confer- 
ences and resulted in the organization and ministry of a 
Southeastern Jurisdiction Fellowship for CJAMM; and 

Whereas, The CJAMM Fellowship of the Southeast- 
ern Jurisdiction of The United Methodist Church is now 
petitioning the 1996 General Conference to establish a 
CJAMM office and director of The United Methodist 
Church; and 

Whereas, The 1984 General Conference adopted a 
petition from the Western North Carolina Conference 
calling for the development of prison ministry and prison 
reform and establishment of a General Council on Min- 
istries committee to work toward this end and to make 
further recommendations; and 

Whereas, the 1988 and 1992 General Conferences 
supported the continued development of this ministry, 
adopting all recommendations of the General Council 
on Ministries committee, including episcopal and An- 
nual Conference actions, and recommending local 
church coordinators and/or councils on prison ministry; 
and 

Whereas, The General Council on Ministries Com- 
mittee on Prison Ministries and Prison Reform is recom- 
mending establishment of a United Methodist Church 
CJAMM office of ministry and advocacy through the 
General Board of Discipleship or the General Board of 
Church and Society or a related agency, such as the 
Foundation for Evangelism; 

Therefore, be it resolved, that, m keeping with our 
history as the Methodist Church and the initiative and 
support given to prison ministry and prison reform by 
the Western North Carolina Conference, the 1995 ses- 
sion of the conference endorse the need for a CJAMM 
office of The United Methodist Church and petition the 
1996 General Conference to act upon our request for a 
CJAMM director. 



Petition Number: 21473-CSNonDis-O; NYMO. 

Homosexuals in the Military 

Basis: The United States of America, a nation built 
on equal rights, has denied the rights of homosexuals 
to actively serve their country while being honest about 
who they are. Meanwhile, The United Methodist 
Church is moving towards accepting all people for who 
they are. The United Methodist Church needs to be an 
advocate for equal civil rights for all marginalized 
groups, including homosexuals. 



Church and Society 



143 



Conclusion: The United Methodist Church should af- 
firm the rights of homosexuals to serve in the United 
States Armed Forces. 



Petition Number: 21047-CSR229-U; GBCS. 

Drug and Alcohol Concerns 

Delete "Drug and Alcohol Concerns" (229) ; "Ban on 
Alcohol Beverage Advertisements" (189); "Confronting 
the Drug Crisis" (211); "Driving Under the Influence" 
(228) ; and "Sale and Use of Alcohol and Tobacco on 
Church Property" (367); and replace with the following 
text 

Drug and Alcohol Concerns 

As God's children and participants in the gift 
of abundant life, we recognize the need to respond 
to those who know brokenness from the wide- 
spread abuse of alcohol and other drugs in our 
world. The experience of God's saving grace of- 
fers wholeness to each individual. In light of the 
reality of alcohol and other drug abuse, the chiu'ch 
has a responsibility to recognize brokenness and 
be an instrument of education, healing, and resto- 
ration. First, we must be committed to confront 
the denial within ourselves that keeps individuals 
and nations from overcoming their struggle with 
alcohol and other drug abuse. Secondly, the alco- 
hol and other drug problem must be tmderstood 
as a social, economic, spiritual, and health prob- 
lem. Third, the church has a fundamental role in 
reorienting the public debate on alcohol and other 
drugs by shifting the focus from punishment to 
prevention and treatment This is rooted in the 
Christian belief in the ongoing possibilities for 
transformation in the life of each individual and in 
our world. 

The alcohol and other drug crisis has reached 
global proportions. More alcohol and other drugs 
are produced and consumed than ever before. In 
consuming countries, with their attendant prob- 
lems of poverty, racism, domestic violence, hope- 
lessness, and material despair, alcohol and other 
dnig abuse is a part of a continuing cycle of eco- 
nomic and spiritual turmoil. 

Abuse of legal drugs (alcohol, tobacco £md 
pharmaceuticals) remains a leading cause of dis- 
ease and death around the world. While recrea- 
tional use of iUegal drugs in the United States has 
declined, the use of drugs remains socially accept- 
able as levels of addiction and abuse continue to 
rise. 

Growing numbers of cities, small towns, and 
rural areas around the world are caught in a web 
of escalating alcohol and other drug-related vio- 
lence. As the findings of the regional hearings in 
the United States stressed: "Drug addiction 



crosses all ethnic, cultural and economic back- 
grounds." Social systems are dangerously strained 
under the heavy weight of alcohol and other drug- 
related health and social problems. Meanwhile the 
supply of drugs from developing countries contin- 
ues to grow in response to high demand from the 
developed coimtries. 

The United States policy response to the drug 
crisis has focused almost exclusively on law en- 
forcement and military solutions. This policy, in 
some cases, has led to the erosion of precious civil 
liberties and human rights, especially for poor and 
minority conmiunities. 

International strategies should reflect the 
need for balanced, equitable economic growth, 
and stable democratic governments in drug-pro- 
ducing developing countries. Most importantiy, 
any alternative strategy must be rooted in local 
communities. The most creative and effective ap- 
proaches to the present crisis begin at the local 
level. 

The United Methodist Church has long op- 
posed abuse of alcohol and other drugs. In 1916, 
the General Conference authorized the formation 
of a Board of Temperance, Prohibition and Public 
Morals, "to make more effectual the efforts of the 
church to create public sentiment and crystallize 
the same into successful opposition to the organ- 
ized trafBc in intoxicating liquors." 

Diuing the 1988-92 quadrennium. The 
United Methodist Chiu"ch laimched a comprehen- 
sive Bishops' Initiative on Drugs and Drug Vio- 
lence which, through regional hearings across the 
United States, deepened the denomination's 
awareness of alcohol and other drug problems. 
The report of these hearings concluded: "There- 
fore, The United Methodist Chtirch must play a 
key role in confronting drug and alcohol addic- 
tion...." Today, The United Metiiodist Church re- 
mains committed to curbing drug traffic and the 
abuse of alcohol and other drugs. 

In response to the alcohol and other drug cri- 
sis. The United Methodist Church commits itself 
to a wholistic approach, which emphasizes pre- 
vention, intervention, treatment, community or- 
ganization, public advocacy, and abstinence. Out 
of love for God and our neighbors, the Church 
must have a positive role by offering a renewed 
spiritual perspective on this crisis. We commend 
local congregations, annual conferences, and gen- 
eral agencies and seminaries to take action in the 
areas of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs. 

I. Alcohol 

Alcohol is a drug, which presents special prob- 
lems because of its widespread social accep- 



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DCA Advance Edition 



tance. We affiim our long-standing conviction 
and recommendation that abstinence from alco- 
holic beverages is a faithful witness to God's liber- 
ating and redeeming love. 

This witness is especially relevant because ex- 
cessive, harmful, and dangerous drinking pat- 
terns are uncritically accepted and practiced. So- 
ciety glamorizes drinldng, and youthful 
immaturity can be exploited for personal gain. The 
costs associated with alcohol use/abuse are more 
than the costs associated with all illegal drugs 
combined. Worldwide, millions of individuals and 
their families suffer as a result of alcoholism. The 
medical consequences of alcohol abuse include 
fetal alcohol syndrome, which is a preventable 
cause of mental retardation, cardiac defects, and 
pre- and postnatal growth retardation. Chronic al- 
cohol constmiption can have a damaging effect on 
every body organ, including brain, Uver, heart, 
stomach, intestines, and mouth. Alcohol is a fac- 
tor in many other social problems such as crime, 
poverty, and family disorder. The societal costs of 
alcohol abuse include lost productivity, increased 
health care costs, loss of lives in vehicular acci- 
dents, and criminal activity. 

Thus, The United Methodist Chiu-ch bases its 
recommendation of abstinence on critical ap- 
praisal of the personal and societal costs in the 
use of alcohol. The church recognizes die freedom 
of the Christian to make responsible decisions 
and calls upon each member to consider seriously 
and prayerfully the witness of abstinence as part 
of his or her Christian commitment Persons who 
practice abstinence should avoid attitudes of self- 
righteousness which express moral superiority 
and condemnatory attitudes toward those who do 
not choose to abstain. Because Christian love in 
human relationships is primary, abstinence is an 
instrument of love and sacrifice and idways sub- 
ject to the requirements of love. 

Our love for our neighbor obligates us to seek 
healing, justice and the alleviation of the social 
conditions which create and perpetuate alcohol 
abuse. Therefore: 

1. We tu^e individuals and local congrega- 
tions to demonstrate active concern for alcohol 
abusers and their families. We encourage 
chiu"ches to support the care, treatment and reha- 
bilitation of problem drinkers. 

2. We urge churches to include the problems 
of alcohol and the value of abstinence as a part of 
Christian education. 

3. We encourage individuals and local congre- 
gations to develop prevention education for family, 



chtu'ch, and community. We encourage sound em- 
pirical research on the social effects of alcohol. 

4. We oppose the sale and consumption of 
alcohoUc beverages within the confines of United 
Methodist Chtu"ch facilities and recommend that 
it be prohibited. 

5. We ask individuals and local congregations 
to study and discuss the problem of driving while 
intoxicated and impaired by alcohol or other drugs 
and support legislation to reduce such activity. 

6. We direct the General Board of Disci- 
pleship and The United Methodist Publishing 
House to incorporate educational material on al- 
cohol and other drug problems throughout its 
graded literature. 

7. We expect United Methodist-related hospi- 
tals to treat the alcoholic person with the attention 
and consideration all patients deserve. We tirge 
the worldwide health care delivery system to fol- 
low this example. 

8. We urge all legislative bodies and health 
care systems to focus on and implement measures 
to help meet the special needs of particular groups 
disproportionately affected by alcohol use. 

9. We favor laws to eliminate all advertising 
and promoting of alcoholic beverages. We tirge the 
General Board of Church and Society and local 
chtu'ches to increase efforts to remove all adver- 
tising of alcoholic bever^es from the media. We 
urge special attention to curbing promotions of 
alcoholic beverages on college campuses as well 
as racial minority communities. 

10. We urge the Federal Trade Commission to 
continue developing better health hazard warning 
statements concerning the use of alcohol. 

11. We ask the United States government to 
improve interagency coordination of drug and al- 
cohol abuse efforts so that there are uniform poli- 
cies and regulations, and we look forward to the 
cooperation of all governments in these areas. 

II. Tobacco 

The use of tobacco is another form of drug 
abuse, even though it is legal. Overwhelming evi- 
dence links cigarette smoking with lung cancer, 
cardio-vascular diseases, emphysema, and 
chronic bronchitis. In addition, cigarette smoking 
can also negatively affect a developing fetus and 
secondary smoke is a known carcinogen. The 
United Methodist Church discom-ages all persons, 
particularly youths and young adults, from using 
any form of tobacco. 



Church and Society 



145 



We commend the suspension of cigarette ad- 
vertising on radio and television. We are con- 
cerned about other advertisements which associ- 
ate smoking with physical and social maturity, 
attractiveness, and success, especially those tar- 
geted at youth, racial minorities, and women. We 
support the Federal Trade Commission's rules re- 
quiring health warning statements in cigarette 
packaging. We are also concerned that the tobacco 
industry is marketing tobacco in developing coun- 
tries. Therefore, 

1 . We recommend that tobacco use be banned 
in all church facilities. 

2. We recommend a tobacco-free environment 
in all public areas. 

3. We recommend the prohibition of all com- 
mercial advertising of tobacco products. 

4. We support expanded research to discover 
the specific mechanisms of addiction to nicotine. 
We urge the development of educational methods 
which effectively discourage the use of tobacco 
and methods to assist those \^o wish to stop 
using tobacco. 

5. We urge the Department of Agriculture and 
other government agencies to plan for and assist 
the orderly economic transition of the tobacco in- 
dustry — tobacco growers, processors and dis- 
tributors — into industries more compatible with 
the general welfare of the people. 

III. Drugs 

The United Methodist Church recognizes the 
widespread use and misuse of drugs which alter 
mood, perception, consciousness, and behavior of 
persons among all ages, classes, emd segments of 
oiu" society. Pharmacologically, a drug is any sub- 
stance which by its chemical nature alters the 
structure or function of any living organism. This 
broad definition encompasses a wide range of sub- 
stances, many of which are psychoactive and have 
the potential for abuse. These include marijuana, 
narcotics, sedatives and stimulants, psychedelics, 
and hallucinogens. Additionally, commonly used 
products such as glue, paint thinners, and gaso- 
line have the potential to be abused as inhalants. 

— Marijuana 

Like alcohol and tobacco, marijuana is fre- 
quently a precursor to the use of other drugs. The 
active ingredient is THC which affects the user by 
temporarily producing feelings of euphoria, re- 
laxation, altered sense of body image and bouts of 
exaggerated laughter are commonly reported. 
However, studies reveal that marijuana impairs 
short term memory, altering sense of time and 



reducing the ability to perform tasks requiring con- 
centration, swift reactions and coordination. 1 

— Sedatives and Stimulants 

Sedatives, which include barbiturates and 
tranquilizers, are prescribed appropriately for 
treatment of anxiety. These legally prescribed 
drugs need to be taken only under appropriate 
medical supervision. The use of this class of 
drugs can result in dependence. 

Severe physical dependence on barbiturates 
can develop at doses higher than therapeutic 
doses, and withdrawal is severe and dangerous. 
The combination of alcohol and barbiturates is 
potentially lethal. 

Stimulants range from amphetamines to mild 
stimulants such as caffeine and nicotine. Pre- 
scribed for obesity, sleep disorders, hyperactivity, 
fatigue and depression, stimulants produce a tem- 
porary sense of vitality, alertness, and energy. 

UnUke other stimulemts, cocaine has Umited 
medical uses. When the powder form is inhaled, 
cocaine is a highly addictive central nervous sys- 
tem stimulant that heightens the body's natural 
response to pleasure and creates a euphoric high 
and has the potential to be extremely lethal. 

A crystallized form of cocaine, "crack," is 
readily available because of its lesser cost Addic- 
tion often comes from one use of the substance. 

— Psychedehcs or Hallucinogens 

Psychedelics or hallucinogens, which include 
LSD, psilocybin, mescaline, PCP, and DMT pro- 
duce changes in perception and altered states of 
consciousness. Not only is there limited medical 
use, the long-term use of these drugs may result 
in permanent psychiatric problems. 

— Narcotics 

Narcotics are prescribed for the relief of pain, 
but the risk of physical and psychological depend- 
encies is well documented. Derived from the 
opiimi plant, natural narcotics include heroin, 
morphine, codeine, and percodan, whUe synthetic 
narcotics include methadone and meperidine. 

Therefore, as The United Methodist Chxu-ch: 

1 . We oppose the use of all drugs, except in 
cases of appropriate medical supervision. 

2. We encourage the church to develop hon- 
est, objective and factual drug education for chil- 
dren, youths and adults as part of a comprehen- 
sive prevention education program. 



146 



DCA Advance Edition 



3. We urge the church to coordmate its eflforts 
with ecumenical, interfaith and commixnity 
groups in prevention, rehabilitation and pohcy 
statements. 

4. We encourage the annual conferences to 
recognize the luiique impact of drugs and its re- 
lated violence upon tu'ban and nu-al areas and 
provide appropriate ministries and resources. 

5. We strongly encourage annual conferences 
to develop leadership training opportunities and 
resoiu"ces for local church pastors and laity to help 
them with: cotmseling individuals and famihes 
who have alcohol and other drug-related prob- 
lems; coxmsehng those bereaved by alcohol and 
other drug-related deaths and violence; and teach- 
ing stress management to chiu'ch workers in com- 
mimities with high alcohol and other drug activity. 

6. We encourage all educational systems at 
every level to develop comprehensive drug educa- 
tion programs and coiu-ses. 

7. We urge redevelopment of more effective 
methods of treatment of drug abuse and addiction. 

8. We support government policies about 
drugs that are compatible with oiu" Christian be- 
liefs about the potential transformation of all indi- 
viduals. 

9. We urge all United Methodist churches in 
the United States to work for a minimum legal 
drinking age of 21 years in their respective states. 

10. We support strong hiunane law enforce- 
ment efforts against the illegal sale of all drugs and 
we urge that those arrested for possession and use 
of illegally procxu^ed drugs be subject to education 
and rehabilitation. 

Performance Resource Press, Inc., Troy, 
Michigan 

Petition Number: 21468-CS-R377-U; GBOD. 

Suicide: A Challenge to Ministry 

The General Board of Discipleship supports the 
retention of the resolution, Suicide: A Challenge to Min- 
istry, page 377 of The Book of Resolutions, with the 
following addition under Causes of Suicide: 



"Youth experience alienation and rejection by so- 
ciety, family and the church when dealing with 
sexual identity issues, including homosexuahty. 
For many youth, the only way out is suicide." 



The Economic Community 

Petition Number: 20156-CS-NonDis-O;NGA 

Taxation Fairness 

Whereas, it has been well documented beyond 
question that the United States Tax Code penalizes 
couples for being legally married; and 

Whereas, under current tax law, many married cou- 
ples pay significantly more in income taxes each year 
than they would have paid if they were single; and 

Whereas, tax credits and other provisions to reduce 
the "Marriage Penalty" have been proposed on numer- 
ous occasions to the United States Congress; and 

Whereas, United States Treasury officials have ac- 
knowledged that the marriage penalties greatly exceed 
$2 bOlion a year; and 

Whereas, our society's very existence is dependent 
upon stable family environments; and 

Whereas, The United Methodist Church has con- 
sistently supported holy and legal marriage as one of the 
bedrocks of our civilization; 

Be it therefore resolved, that we. General Confer- 
ence of The United Methodist Church, call upon all 
members of Congress to support the immediate elimi- 
nation of any and all tax provisions which penalize legally 
married couples and cause their income tax obligation 
to be greater than it would be if they were filing as single 
individuals. 



Petition Number: 20523-CS-NonDis-O;CAP, WVA 

Call for a Rebirth of Compassion 

The great strength of U.S. society has always been 
that its citizens believed that despite hardship, inequi- 
ties, and injustice, the system has the capacity to be 
fundamentally fair and offers the possibility of a better 
life to all its citizens. This belief, despite segregation, led 
Blacks to work to reform and not overthrow the system. 
It led women, despite patriarchy and discrimination, to 
demand and work for full participation in the system. In 
the worst social crisis of this century, the Great Depres- 
sion, widespread unrest and upheaval was avoided when 
the system moved quickly to assist the poor and the 
unemployed. In these times of crisis, the U.S. people 
have joined together for the common good, drawing 
upon a deep-seated sense of fairness and compassion 
rooted in their religious and ethical traditions. 

Today, this "social contract," which has been the 
glue holding together a nation as diverse as any in the 
world, is being replaced by a new spirit of divisiveness 
and narrow self-interest It is as though the challenge of 
John F. Kennedy, "Ask what you can do for your coun- 



Church and Society 



147 



try," has been changed to "Ask only what's in it for you." 
This has led to a massive upward redistribution of wealth 
in U.S. society until today the top 5% have more wealth 
than the bottom 40% combined. Conspicuous consump- 
tion and waste goes hand in hand with rising homeless- 
ness, children born into poverty and the elderly forced 
into it. As this process continues, middle America, for 
the first time since the Depression, has seen its standard 
of living decline and can no longer expect the next 
generation to have a better life. 

The response of our political leadership to this crisis 
has been to point the finger of blame at those deemed 
responsible — the poor. In a "big lie" reminiscent of Nazi 
Germany, the problems of U.S. society are blamed on 
teenage mothers, welfare recipients, racial minorities, 
women's liberation, programs of social welfare, and ho- 
mosexuals. 

Encouraged by demagogic politicians, mean-spir- 
ited talk-show hosts, and millionaire tele-evangelists, the 
social contract, which has bound this nation together 
since the Civil War, is being systematically unraveled, 
with the result that increasing numbers of Americans 
are forced into poverty, unemployment, low-wage jobs, 
and homelessness, while their children are denied the 
education which once promised that children of poverty 
could aspire to a better life than their parents. The 
direction is clear: as economic and social conditions 
worsen, those who benefit from injustice and inequality 
will become increasingly strident in placing blame on 
the poor and the powerless, and the downward spiral will 
continue until the nation explodes in civil unrest and the 
repression of a police state. 

In such a climate of anger, violence and stridency, 
even Jesus would be derided were he to call in to one of 
the popular talk shows and call for a rebirth of compas- 
sion. There are few politicians in either major party who 
are willing to challenge the ethics of selfishness, greed 
and scapegoating which characterize politics today. Too 
few voices challenge the culture of sex, violence, self-in- 
dulgence and instant gratification spewed into millions 
of homes 24 hours a day. 

We believe that it is to such a time and such a 
mission that God is calling the church 2000 years after 
the Savior's birth. It is the unique mission of the religious 
community to call this nation to a rebirth of compassion. 
How prophetic today are the words of Jesus, quoting 
Isaiah: "The Spirit of the Lord is upon me, for he has 
anointed me to bring good news to the poor. He has sent 
me to proclaim release of captives and recovery of sight 
to the blind, to let the oppressed go fi^ee, to proclaim the 
year of the Lord's favor." (Luke 4:18) 

In this spirit, we call upon United Methodists 
throughout the land not only to feed the hungry and 
house the homeless, but to work for policies that will 
end hunger and homelessness. We call upon our bish- 
ops to speak boldly for those who cannot speak for 
themselves — against economic policies which benefit 



the few at the expense of the many, against violence 
toward women and homosexuals, and against the con- 
tinued militarization of a nation with no external threat. 

We call on our people to support candidates for 
office who are committed to policies of full employment, 
universal health insurance, long-term health care, qual- 
ity public education for all children, reduced military 
spending, and progressive taxation. 

Finally, we call on our churches to reach out in love 
and compassion to all persons, regardless of race, eco- 
nomic condition, sexual preference, and religious per- 
suasion, becoming beacons of love in a stormy sea of 
hatred, discrimination, and violence. Let us be signs of 
the coming reign of God in our midst — a reign marked 
by compassion and justice. 



Petition Number: 20524-CSNonDis-O;WVA. 

Principles of Welfare Reform 

Whereas, as people of faith and religious commit- 
ment, we are called to stand with and seek justice for 
people who are poor; central to our religious traditions, 
sacred texts, and teachings is a divine mandate to side 
with and protect the poor; we share a conviction, there- 
fore, that welfare reforms must not focus on eliminating 
programs but on eliminating poverty and the damage it 
inflicts on children (who are 2/3 of all welfare recipi- 
ents), on their parents, and on the rest of society; and 

Whereas, we recognize the benefit to the entire 
community of helping people move from welfare into the 
job market when possible and appropriate; we fear, 
however, that reform will fail if it ignores labor market 
issues such as unemployment and an inadequate mini- 
mum wage and important family issues such as the 
affordability of child care and the economic value of 
care-giving in the home; successful welfare reform will 
depend on addressing these concerns as well as a whole 
range of such related issues as pay equity, affordable 
housing, and the access to health care; and 

Whereas, we believe that people are more important 
than the sum of their economic activities; successful 
welfare reform demands more than economic incentives 
and dis-incentives; it depends on overcoming both bi- 
ased assumptions about race, gender, and class that feed 
hostile social stereotypes about people living in poverty 
and suspicions that people with perspectives other than 
our own are either indifferent or insincere; successful 
welfare reform will depend ultimately upon finding not 
only a common ground of policies but a common spirit 
about the need to pursue them for all; and 

Whereas, the following principles do not exhaust 
our concerns nor resolve all issues raised. The princi- 
ples will serve nonetheless as our guide in assessing 
proposed legislation in the coming national welfare de- 
bate; we hope they may also serve as a rallying point for 
a common effort with others throughout the nation. 



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Therefore, be it resolved, that the following state- 
ment, "Principles of Welfare Reform," be sent to the 
President of the United States, Speaker of the House of 
Representatives, and the United States Senate Majority 
Leader: 

A Statement of Shared Principles of Welfare Reform 

An acceptable welfare program must result in lifting 
people out of poverty, not merely in reducing welfare 
roles. 

I. The federal government should define minimum 
benefit levels of programs serving low income people, 
below which states will not be permitted to fall. These 
benefits must be adequate to provide a decent standard 
of living. 

n. Welfare reform efforts designed to move people 
into the work force must create jobs that pay a liveable 
wage [at least 150% of the poverty level plus full benefits] 
and do not displace present workers. Programs should 
eliminate barriers to employment and provide training 
and education necessary, including post-high school 
education such as vocation school and college for inex- 
perienced and young workers to get and hold jobs. Such 
programs must provide child care, transportation, and 
other ancillary services that will make participation both 
possible and reasonable. Kthe government becomes the 
employer-of-last-resort, the jobs provided must pay a 
family-sustaining wage. 

ni. Dis-incentives to work should be removed by 
allowing welfare recipients to retain a larger portion of 
wage earnings and assets before losing cash, housing, 
health, child-care or other benefits. 

IV. Work-based programs must not impose arbi- 
trary time limits. If mandated, limits must not be im- 
posed without availability of viable jobs at a family-sus- 
taining wage. Exemptions should be offered for people 
with serious physical or mental illness, disabling condi- 
tions, responsibilities as care-givers for incapacitated 
family members, and for those primary care-givers who 
have responsibility for young children. 

V. Welfare reform should result in a program that 
brings together and simplifies the many efforts of fed- 
eral, state and municipal governments to assist persons 
and families in need. "One-stop shopping centers" 
should provide information, counseling, and legal assis- 
tance regarding such issues as child support, job train- 
ing and placement, medical care, affordable housing, 
food programs, and education. 

VI. Welfare reform should acknowledge the respon- 
sibility of both government and parents in seeking the 
well-being of children. No child should be excluded 
fi-om receiving benefits available to other siblings be- 
cause of having been bom while the mother was on 
welfare. No child should be completely removed from 
the safety net because of a parent's failure to fulfill 



agreements with the government. Efforts are needed to 
increase the level of child support assistance fi-om non- 
custodial parents. 

VII. Programs designed to replace current welfare 
programs must be adequately funded. It must be recog- 
nized and accepted that more will be invested in the 
short-term than the present Aid to Families with De- 
pendent Children Program. However, if welfare reform 
programs are successfully implemented, they will cost 
less as the number of families in need of assistance 
diminishes over the long-term. In financing this effort, 
funding should not be taken from other programs that 
successfully serve the poor. 



Petition Number: 21048-CSR412-U; GBCS. 

Gambling 

Amend "Gambling," p. 412: 

The Social Principles states., .for support of charities 
or government" [See Social Principles, Paragraph 
73.G] 

One of the caacntial commandments, according to 
Jc9U9, is "Love thy neighbor as thyself' (Matthew 22:30 - 
40). This, together with loving God with all of one's 
being, summoriiics all of the law. 

When asked which commandment is first of 
all, Jesus answered, "Hear O Israel: the Lord our 
God, the Lord is one; you shall love the Lord Thy 
God, with all your heart, and with all your soul, 
and with all your mind, and with all yoiu* 
strength." (Mk. 12:29-30) Gambling feeds on hu- 
man greed and invites persons to place their trust 
in possessions rather than in God. It represents a 
form of idolatry wWch contradicts the first com- 
mandment Jesus continued. The second is this. 
You shall love your neighbor as yourself." (Mk, 
12:31) In relating with compassion to our sisters 
and brothers, we are called to resist those prac- 
tices and systems which exploit them and leave 
them impoverished and demeaned. 

Gambling, as a means of keeping acquiring mate- 
rial gain ©frfy by chance.. .and is destructive to the inter- 
ests of good government It encourages the belief 
that work is unimportant, that money can solve all 
oiu* problems, and that greed is die norm for 
achievement It serves as a "regressive tax" on 
those with lower income. In summary, gambling 
is bad economics; gambUng is bad public policy; 
and gambling does not improve the quahty of life. 

We oppose the growing legalization and state pro- 
motion of gambling... 

[Last paragraph] The Church has a key role.. .gam- 
bling or fund raising. We United Methodists should 
refi'ain... funding which do not depend upon gambling. 



Church and Society 



149 



The General Board of Church and Society in 
cooperation widi other general agencies shall pro- 
vide materials to local churches and annual con- 
ferences for study and action to combat gambling 
and aid persons addicted to gambling. The gen- 
eral agencies, annual conferences and local 
churches should work with the National Coalition 
Against Legalized Gambling, a grassroots organi- 
zation of reUgious and conununity persons work- 
ing to stop and reverse legalized gambling. 

The Political Community 

Petition Number: 20027-CS-NonDis-O;SNJ. 

Amendment to the Constitution 
of the United States of America 

The General Conference of The United Methodist 
Church shall petition the Congress of the United States 
and the legislators of all fifty states to adopt the following 
amendment to the Constitution of the United States of 
America: "Any public body may convene and/or con- 
clude any public meeting with a period of meditation." 

Petition Number: 20359-CS-NonDis-O;KSE. 

Separation of Church and State 

Whereas, The United Methodist Church has his- 
torically supported the separation of church and state, 
including the free exercise of religion; and 

Whereas, The United Methodist Church has under- 
stood this to mean that government must be neutral in 
matters of religion and may not show preference of one 
religion over others, for religion in general or for religion 
over non-religion; and 

Whereas, The United Methodist Church has con- 
tinued to affirm the position that government may not 
engage in, sponsor, supervise, aid or lend its authority 
to religious expression or religious observance; 

Therefore, be it resolved, that the 1996 General 
Conference, meeting in Denver, Colorado, reaffirm its 
historic position and oppose any government legislation 
or Constitutional amendment that would change our 
existing First Amendment rights with regard to the use 
of public funds to support non-public elementary and 
secondary schools where religion is taught, or with 
regard to religious observances in public schools. 



Petition Number: 20360-CS-NonDis-O;RKM. 

Closing of Military Installations 

Resolved, that the 1996 General Conference work 
for economic and environmental justice by: 

1. encouraging a reduction in military spending; 



2. encouraging detailed and broad-based commu- 
nity planning for the downsizing or closing of military 
installations; and 

3. supporting Restoration Advisory Boards, techni- 
cal Review Committees, BRAC Re-Use Committees, and 
other official bodies overseeing environmental cleanup 
and conversion planning at Department of Defense or 
Department of Energy sites. 



Petition Number: 20361-CS-NonDis-O;RKM. 

Removal or Reduction of U.S. Military Bases 
in Okinawa 

Resolved that the 1996 General Conference support 
the present government of Okinawa and the vast major- 
ity of the Okinawan people in their strong, unceasing 
efforts to achieve the complete removal or substantial 
reduction of U.S. military bases and U.S. military person- 
nel on the island of Okinawa and other islands in Oki- 
nawa Prefecture of Japan, and the return of those lands 
for peaceful, constructive purposes; and that a copy of 
this petition be sent to the President of the United States, 
the U.S. Secretary of State, and the U.S. Secretary of 
Defense for consideration and action, and that a copy be 
sent to the Governor of Okinawa and the Prime Minister 
of Japan for their information. 



Petition Number: 20525-CS-NonDis-O;CAP. 

Public Ftmding of Federal Elections 

Whereas, the democratic values of our nation are 
being eroded by a political system no longer responsive 
to the needs of the American people; 

Whereas, this failure is directiy attributed to the 
spiraling cost of political campaigns and the attendant 
demand for more and more money to finance those 
campaigns; 

Whereas, the citizens of America are in danger of 
losing their representative form of government because 
the two major political parties are increasingly under the 
control of a small, but wealthy, clientele who seek domi- 
nance of the political process; 

Whereas, the potential for this political dominance 
may be seen, to an alarming degree, by campaign con- 
tributions that in the 1994 Congressional elections ex- 
ceeded $580,000,000; 

Whereas, 1994 campaign contributions to incum- 
bents in the House of Representatives exceeded 
$239,000,000, while their challengers raised less than 
$86,000,000; 

Whereas, political action committees (PACS) in 
1994 conti-ibuted more than $147,000,000 to Congres- 
sional races; 



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Whereas, on average, more than $300,000 in PAC 
money was given to the winners in the 48 closest House 
races while the average given to their challengers was 
less than $35,000 — a stunning example of influence ped- 
dling; 

Whereas, dependence upon special interest money 
and PACs has a direct impact on the substantive posi- 
tions adopted by the two major political parties; 

Whereas, the adoption of public funding for cam- 
paigns would help restore the true meaning of our rep- 
resentative form of Government and bring an end to the 
control of special interests, however defined; 

Whereas, the restoration of such a govern- 
ment — one in accord with the vision that stirred the 
Framers of the Constitution — ^would significantly assist 
the citizens of the United States of America in reaffirm- 
ing their belief in a "Government of the People, by the 
People, and for the People"; 

Whereas, the supporters of this resolution under- 
stand that no government is perfect, that all govern- 
ments are flawed and, as members of The United Meth- 
odist Church, we have a clear obligation to confront this 
evil of money and politics and to minimize its strangle- 
hold on the democratic institutions of our nation; 

Therefore, the 1996 General Conference affirms 
support for public funding of all federal elections. 



Petition Number: 21480-CS-NonDis-O;SIN. 

Against Political Mudslinging 

Whereas, the use of character assassination and the 
misrepresentation of another candidate's position and 
record is deceptive and manipulative, pre3dng on our 
worst human qualities instead of building on our best; 
and 

Whereas, negative campaigning undermines the 
faith of the public in all political leaders and creates a 
climate of hostility and divisiveness, making it difficult 
for our elected officials to work together; and 

Whereas, instead of distorting the truth for political 
gain we should "speak the truth to our neighbors" 
(Ephesians 4:25), and the General Rules of The Meth- 
odist Church condemns "Uncharitable or unprofitable 
conversation; particularly speaking evil of magistrates 
or of ministers"; 

Be it resolved, that The United Methodist Church 
call upon all candidates for public office to focus their 
campaigns on the issues, and on their own qualifications 
to serve in office; that they refrain from personal attacks 
and name-calling of opponents; that they do not distort 
an opponent's views by taking quotes out of context or 
misrepresenting the opponent's positions or voting re- 



cord; and that they set an example of truthfulness and 
integrity for the public. 

Be it further resolved, that The United Methodist 
Church call upon all candidates for the office of Presi- 
dent of the United States to lead the country in this style 
of campaigning by conducting their campaigns with 
honesty and respect. 



Petition Number: 21364-CS-R504-U; GBGM. 

Gun Violence in the U.S. 

Delete "Gun Control," pp. 504-506 and "U.S. Gun 
Violence," pp. 536-539 and replace with the following: 

With the mounting proliferation of firearms 
throughout the world, the safety of God's children 
cannot be guaranteed. Crime in city streets 
climbs, accidents abound, domestic violence 
erupts and suicides soar. Christians concerned 
about reverence for life care about what is happen- 
ing to many victims of gtui miu-ders and assaults. 
In the name of Christ, who came that persons 
might know abundant life, we call upon the 
Chiu-ch to afOrm its faitii through vigorous efforts 
to ciu"b gim violence. Gim violence aroimd the 
world is a growing menace, particularly in the 
United States. Today, deaths and assaults involv- 
ing guns of all kinds have reached devastatingly 
high levels. The Center for Disease Control and 
the New England Journal of Medicine have de- 
clared this crisis one of "epidemic proportions." 
A severe health crisis is created in many commu- 
nities as the physical and psychological health of 
innumerable tu'ban and rural families is impacted 
by gun violence. 

Gxm violence is a deep concern to The United 
Methodist Chiu-ch and tiie commtmity of faith 
whose members are called to a vision of a peace- 
able kingdom, a society in which God's justice 
reigns, where reconciliation replaces aUenation, 
where an open hand and a turned cheek replaces 
retaliation, where love of enemy is as important as 
love of neighbor. The rehgious community must 
also take seriously the risk of idolatry that could 
restdt from an unwarranted fascination with guns, 
and that overlooks or ignores the social conse- 
quences of their misuse. The United Methodist 
Chm-ch regards effective gun control and regida- 
tion to be a spiritual concern and public responsi- 
bility. 

Working as an instrument of reconciliation, 
The United Methodist Church is among those re- 
hgious communions calling for social poUcies and 
personal lifestyles that bring an end to senseless 
gim violence. The United States might weU learn 
from the experience of other societies where strin- 
gent gim control laws are enforced. The gun mur- 



Church and Society 



151 



der rate per 100,000 population in the United 
States is 100 times greater than in England and 
Wales, where strict gun laws prevail; it is 200 times 
greater than in Japan, where it is impossible for the 
public to secure handguns legally. In the United 
States, approximately 30,000 men, women, and 
children are shot to death in homicides, suicides 
and accidents. This does not take into account the 
approximately 250,000 people suffering injuries 
costing the society over $24 billion each year. Over 
three quarters of these medical expenses are paid 
for with public tax dollars that could be used for 
conununity development and to aid those in need. 

Behind the statistics often lies great tragedy: 
children and teachers are being shot in school; 
depressed persons are taking their lives with 
guns; persons wiio piu-chase guns to protect their 
homes often end up using them to kill a loved one; 
police officers are being gimned down in increas- 
ing numbers in the course of duty. 

As Christians who are deeply concerned about 
human life, we must do something about the un- 
regulated and uimecessary access to guns. 

We do not believe there is any constitutional 
personal right to bear arms. Although there is 
vigorous debate over the meaning of the Second 
Amendment to the Constitution, which speaks to 
the right to keep and bear arms, the United States 
Supreme Court and lower federal coiuts have held 
that the private ownership of guns is not protected 
by the Second Amendment 

Most gun-related deaths and injuries in the 
United States are by handguns originally acquired 
for personal protection, target shooting, gun col- 
lections and hunting. Some are by sho^uns and 
rifles most often acquired for legitimate sporting 
or collecting. An increasing number of deatiis emd 
injiuies are by semi-automatic and automatic 
guns, often referred to as assault weapons, devel- 
oped for wartime piuposes. The futility of these 
weapons far outweighs the utility. 

In spite of the purpose for which guns are 
acquired, deaths and injuries residting from their 
use contribute significantiy to the atmosphere of 
violence, fear and alienation that is a daily part of 
life in the United States today. There are over an 
estimated 65 million handguns and 135 million 
rifles in the United States — nearly one gun for 
each man, woman and child. While guns are not 
the sole cause of violence, their ready availability 
for purchase, easy accessibility to children, and 
convenient access to those contemplating criminal 
activity or suicide make gun violence a monumen- 
tal social problem. We believe that the time has 
come for all nations to move toward a less violent 
and more civilized society. 



As people of faith, we recognize the inherent 
goodness of all creation. We firmly believe in God 
as the giver and sustainer of all life. We also rec- 
ognize the ultimate purpose of creation is to reveal 
God's reign of justice and peace. The biblical ad- 
monition to choose life instead of death sets the 
tone for all human activity. "I call heaven and 
earth to witness against you today that I have set 
before you life and deatii, blessings and curses. 
Choose life so that you and your descendants may 
live..." (Deuteronomy 30:19). Our focus must not 
lose the vision of transformation given to us in 
Micah to beat otu* swords into plowshares and oiu* 
spears into pruning hooks (Micah 4:3). Therefore, 
The United Methodist Church: 

1. Declares its support for meaningful and 
effective federal legislation to regulate the impor- 
tation, manufacturing, sale, and possession of 
guns and ammimition by the general public. Such 
legislation should include provisions for the regis- 
tration and Ucensing of gun purchasers and own- 
ers, appropriate background investigation and 
waiting periods prior to gun piu'chase, and regu- 
lation of subsequent sale. 

2. Cedls upon the United States government to 
estabUsh a national ban on the importation, manu- 
facture, sale and possession of handguns and 
handgun ammunition with reasonable limited ex- 
ceptions. Such exceptions shotdd be restricted to: 
the police, the military, licensed security guards, 
antique dealers who maintain guns in unfireable 
condition, and licensed pistol clubs where fire- 
arms are kept on the premises under secure con- 
ditions. Those who comply with the law and turn 
in their gims should be compensated at fair value 
through a cash payment or tax credit 

3. Opposes the licensing of individuals to 
carry concealed weapons. Special controls should 
be appUed to the handgim, for it is the most deadly 
and least utihtarian weapon in American society. 
Because the handgun is concealable, it is the 
weapon of crime; because the handgun is avail- 
able, it is the instrument used in suicides and 
crimes of passion. 

4. Calls for the continuation and strengthening 
of the federal ban on the sale and possession of 
assault weapons. 

5. Supports the oudawing of the production 
and sales of automatic weapon conversion Idts as 
well as the production of gims that cannot be de- 
tected by traditionally used metal detection de- 
vises. 

6. Calls upon the United States government to 
establish product protection laws and regulate 
gims through the Consumer Protection Agency. 



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7. Calls upon the media and entertainment 
industry to refrain from promoting gun usage to 
children in such magazines as Boys Life, Guns and 
Ammo, Guns, The American Rifleman and many oth- 
ers. We also discourage the graphic depiction and 
glorification of violence by the entertainment in- 
dustry. 

8. Calls on all United Methodists who are 
members of gun clubs and associations to use 
their influence to help expand gun education and 
safety programs. These individuals shotild also 
enter into dialogue with their clubs and associa- 
tions to estabUsh responsible and safe gim regu- 
lations, and to build a seifer and less violent soci- 
ety. 

9. Calls for all church properties and facihties 
to be designated as "No Gun Zones" and prohibit 
guns from being carried onto the premises. 

Petition Number: 20003-CS-R536-U;CNV. 

U.S. Gun Violence 

Amend "U.S. Gun Violence," Book of Resolutions, 
p.538-9: 

Once again, the church dare not te be silent Be- 
cause our society is experiencing increasing gun vio- 
lence 

Therefore, as United Methodists, we recommend 
the following: 

1. That the United Methodists work toward discour - 
aging discourage the graphic depiction.... 

3. That all governing bodies, annual conferences, 

congregations, and their members join in dialogue.... 

5. That annual conferences make visible pub- 
lic witness to the sin of gun violence and to the 
hope of community healing. 

S6. That all governing bodies, that annual con- 
ferences, congregations, and members.... 

6. [Delete.] 

7. ...to develop model legislation and guidelines for 
implementations. 

Furthermore, we call upon the United States govern- 
ment to: 

2. (Retain as is, except correct spelling of climate.) 

4. Outlaw the sale* and manufacture of all automatic 
weapon conversion kits since their only purpose is to 
produce illegal firearms . 



Finally, we instruct the Secretary of the Gen- 
eral Conference to communicate this resolution 
on gun violence to the Congress and to the Presi- 
dent of the United States. 



Petition Number: 20859-CS-R536-U; Methodist Federa- 
tion for Social Action, CPA. 

Gun Violence 

Amend "Gun Violence," beginning on p. 538 of the 
1992 Book of Resolutions as follows: 

...overlooks or ignores the social consequences of 
thef their misuse. 

Once again tT he church dsfe must not to be si- 
lent... regards effective gun control and regulation to be 
a matter of spiritual concrcn concern and pubbc respon- 
sibility... 

Therefore, as United Methodists, we recommend 
the following: 

1. That #ie United Methodists work toward diseour 
aging discourage the graphic depiction.. .and we lU'ge 
that this be done at all levels. 

2. [Delete.] 

32 . That all governing bodies annual conferences, 
congregations, and their members join in dialogue^wift 
gun clubs and similar associations in the effort to estab- 
lish responsible gun regulations, to build a safer and less 
violent society, and to ask sports people to agree to incur 
some small inconveniences, such as waiting periods, 
before purchases ptu'chasing in order to reduce the 
senseless deaths of many people. 

3. That annual conferences make visible pub- 
lic witness to the sin of gxm violence and to the 
hope of commimity healing. 

4. [Delete.] 

54. That annual conferences, all congregations, 
and their members become involved in coalitions... 

6. [Delete.] 

?5. That the General Board of Church and Society 
give emphasis... 

Furthermore, we call upon the United States govern- 
ment to: 

1. Establish meaningful and effective federal legis- 
lation to regulate the importation, manufacture, sale and 
possession of guns and ammunition... 

2. Address more urgentiy the societal situations, 
including the clmate climate of fear,... 



Church and Society 



153 



4. Outlaw the sale and manufacture of all automat- 
ic-weapon conversion kits since their only purpoac ia to 
produce illegal fireormo . 

5. Outlaw the manufacture and sale of guns... 

Finally, we instruct the Secretary of the Gen- 
eral Conference to communicate this resolution 
on gun violence to the Congress and to the Presi- 
dent of the United States, 



Petition Number: 20699-CS-R538-U;NIL. 

Gun Violence 

Amend "U.S. Gun Violence," TJie Book of Resolu- 
tions, pp. 538, 539: 

Once again, tThe church dare not to be silent.. .to be 
a matter of spiritual concrcn concern and public respon- 
sibility. 

Therefore, as United Methodists, we recommend 
the following: 

1. That the United Methodists work toward discour - 
aging discotirage the graphic depiction. ..and ¥^ urge 
that this be done at all levels. 

2. [Delete.] 

3. That all governing bodie s . Annual Confer- 
ences, congregations, and their members join in dia- 
logu c with gun clubs and similar a ss ociation s in the 

effort to establish... 

4. [Delete.] 

5. That Annual Conferences, all congregations, 
and their members become involved... 

6. [Delete.] 

Furthermore, we call upon the United States govern- 
ment to: 

1. Establish meaningful and effective federal legis- 
lation to regulate the importation, manufacture,. ..wait- 
ing periods prior to gun purchases, and regulation... 

2. Address more urgendy the societal situations, 
including the clmatc climate of fear,... 

4. Outlaw the sales and manufacture of all automat- 
ic-weapon conversion kits since their only purpose is to 
produce illegal firearms . 

The World Community 

Petition Number: 20697-CS-NonDis-O;NNY. 
The Promised Financied Aid to the Palestinians 



Whereas, the signing of the Oslo Accord by the PLO 
and Israel in September, 1993 stipulated financial aid for 
a necessary and rapid improvement in the economy of 
the occupied territories; and 

Whereas, external parties, including the United 
States, at the World Bank Conference in October, 1993, 
pledged 2.4 billion dollars to help revive the failing 
economy of the West Bank and the Gaza Strip and to 
provide for immediate and basic needs such as nutrition, 
housing, health care, sanitation, education, and jobs; 
and 

Whereas, delivery of aid has kept pace neither with 
the promises nor the needs, causing further deteriora- 
tion of the living standards of the Palestinians, contrib- 
uting to the unrest and cycle of violence which is endan- 
gering free elections, and making it difficult for the 
Palestinian National Authority to establish educational 
systems and other social programs and to implement 
economic development; and 

Whereas, continued and, in many cases, intensified 
closures, confiscation of Palestinian land by the govern- 
ment of Israel, and the importing of foreign workers into 
Israel to replace Palestinian labor, coupled with eco- 
nomic policies of the Israeli government which hamper 
economic development in the West Bank and Gaza, have 
caused a further deterioration of the living standards of 
Palestinians, an increasing distrust of the peace process 
and its leaders, and an increasing sense of hopelessness 
and frustration; and 

Whereas, we deplore the violence directed toward 
Israelis and the violence directed towards Palestinians 
and believe that, even as we hold the perpetrators re- 
sponsible and accountable, we must address the root 
causes; 

Be it resolved, that The United Methodist Church 
insist that our government release its portion of the aid 
immediately and encourage other nations to do the 
same; and 

Be it further resolved, that we request that our 
government reevaluate the entire structure of aid to the 
Middle East, one goal being to redistribute the huge 
amount now given to Israel and Egypt, and a second goal 
being to consider economic support for the efforts of 
non-governmental organizations, including religious in- 
stitutions, human rights groups, labor unions, and pro- 
fessional groups; and 

Be it further resolved, that we insist that our govern- 
ment use its influence upon the State of Israel to cease 
the confiscation of land, allow freedom of movement to 
the Palestinian people, and cease those economic poli- 
cies which are detrimental to development in the West 
Bank of Gaza; and 

Be it further resolved, that copies of this resolution 
be sent to the representatives of the State of Israel in the 



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United States, to the President of the United States, the 
Secretary of State, the Representatives and Senators, the 
Council of Bishops of Tlie United Methodist Church, 
and representatives of the General Board of Church and 
Society and the General Board of Global Ministries. 



Petition Number: 20698-CS-NonDis-O;NNY. 

The Building of Settlements 
in the Occupied Territories 

Whereas, the continuing efforts by the State of 
Israel to build settlements in the occupied territories 
violates both international law and the spirit of the Dec- 
laration of Principles, that such efforts are based upon a 
vision of superiority of Jewish claims to land over the 
long-standing and recognized claims to the land by 
indigenous Palestinian people, and that such efforts 
have a devastating effect on Palestinian communities; 
and 

Whereas, the continuing confiscation of private land 
for the construction of setdements stands as an impedi- 
ment to peace because it violates both international law 
and the Declaration of Principles; it destroys the capac- 
ity of people in Palestinian communities to work and 
earn a livelihood; it, along with the restrictions on build- 
ing placed on the Palestinian communities, forces the 
emigration of Palestinian people from the occupied ter- 
ritories; and it demoralizes the indigenous Palestinian 
population; and 

Whereas, the prophet Isaiah cautioned against cov- 
eting the lands and homes of one's neighbors..." Woe to 
you who add house to house and field to field until no 
space is left and you live alone in the land." (Isaiah 5:8); 
and 

Whereas, the continuing confiscation of privately 
held land for construction of settlements violates basic 
understandings of human rights, perverts the peace 
process, destroys the hope of people who are working 
for and longing for peace, both Israelis and Palestinians, 
and fosters a sense of desperation which can only lead 
to further violence; and 

Whereas, we in the United States are providing 
financial assistance to the State of Israel which allows for 
the building of these settlements; 

Be it resolved, that The United Methodist Church 
communicate its opposition to continuing confiscation 
of Palestinian land, the continued building of Jewish 
settlements, and any vision of a "greater Israel" which 
includes the Occupied Territories and/or the whole of 
Jerusalem and its surroundings to the Prime Minister of 
Israel and the Ambassador of Israel in Washington, 
D.C.; and 

Be it further resolved, that we communicate the 
above to the President of the United States, the Secre- 
tary of State, the appropriate Congress people and Sena- 



tors, along with our desire that the United States hold 
the State of Israel accountable for its actions and refuse 
to support the continued confiscation of land and build- 
ing of settlements; and 

Be it further resolved, that we send copies of this 
resolution to representatives of The United Methodist 
Church on the Boards of Church and Society, the Gen- 
eral Board of Global Ministries, and the Council of 
Bishops. 



Petition Number: 20746-CS-NonDis-O;NNY. 

Jerusalem 

Whereas, Jerusalem is sacred to all the children of 
Abraham: Jews, Muslims, and Christians; and 

Whereas, we lift up a vision of Jerusalem as a city of 
peace and reconciliation where indigenous Palestinians 
and Israelis can live as neighbors and, along with visitors 
and tourists, have access to holy sites and exercise 
freedom of religious expression; and 

Whereas, the peaceful resolution of the Jerusalem 
issue is crucial to the success of the whole process of 
making peace between Palestinians and Israelis; and 

Whereas, the United States, until the issue is re- 
solved, should reflect international consensus and law, 
and accordance with United Nations Resolution 242, as 
well as the long-standing United States view that the 
Jerusalem issue is unresolved and that East Jerusalem 
is occupied territory; and 

Whereas, the Jerusalem issue is in danger of being 
resolved, not by negotiations between all parties, but by 
policies of the Israeli government, which include the 
confiscation of increasing amounts of Palestinian land, 
expansion of the borders of Jerusalem to include more 
and more Palestinian villages and lands, thus forming 
what is now known as "Greater Jerusalem," the building 
of setdements for Jewish families on these lands, clo- 
sures which prevent Palestinians from traveling to or 
through Jerusalem, the withholding of basic services 
from tax-paying Palestinian neighborhoods, the denial 
of Jerusalem identity cards whenever possible to Pales- 
tinian citizens, and the denial of building permits for 
Palestinians, which contributes to the increased number 
of homeless and causes Palestinian residents of Jerusa- 
lem to leave the city; and 

Whereas, the United States, by its silence and with 
its financial assistance, contributes to the building of 
these "facts on the ground," which are an impediment 
to peace and may preclude any hope of Jerusalem ever 
becoming that City of Peace and Reconciliation for 
which we pray; 

Be it resolved, that The United Methodist Church 
request that our government pressure the State of Israel 
to: 



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155 



1. Cease the confiscation of Palestinian lands, 

2. Cease the building of new or development of 
existing settlements in the occupied territory and Gaza, 

3. Lift the closure of Jerusalem to Palestinians, 

4. Issue Jerusalem building permits to Palestinians 
so they can build on their own land, 

5. Halt the policy which would deny Jerusalem iden- 
tity cards whenever possible to Palestinian citizens, 

6. Address the problem of homelessness, severe 
overcrowding, and substandard housing among the Pal- 
estinian residents of Jerusalem; and 

Be it further resolved, that we insist that our govern- 
ment leaders take the following actions: 

1. Refuse to move the United States embassy fi^om 
Tel Aviv to Jerusalem, a move which has been called for 
by several Congress people, 

2. Refrain from signing "sense of the Congress 
letters," which hold, among other things, that Jerusalem 
is the capital of Israel and only Israel, 

3. Continue to meet with both Palestinian and Israeli 
leaders in Jerusalem, 

4. Continue to deduct from Israeli loan guarantees 
an amount equal to all Israeli settlement spending, in- 
cluding spending for settlements in and around Jerusa- 
lem, 

5. Affirm the long-standing policy of the United 
States that statements and actions should continue to 
reflect the view that the status of Jerusalem is unre- 
solved and that East Jerusalem is, indeed, occupied 
territory; and 

Be it further resolved, that we communicate the 
above to the President of the United States, the Secre- 
tary of State, the appropriate Congress people and Sena- 
tors, and representatives of the Israeli government; and 

Be it further resolved, that we send copies of this 
resolution to representatives of The United Methodist 
Church on the Board of Church and Society, the General 
Board of Global Ministries, and the Council of Bishops. 



Petition Number: 21043-CS-NonDis-O; GBCS. 

The U.S Campaign for a Peace Tax Fund 

We have long supported those persons who cannot 
in conscience pay taxes in support of war. We believe 
they should be granted the same legal recognition as 
that granted to conscientious objectors to military serv- 
ice. Toward that end we recognize the work of the 
National Campaign for a Peace Tax Fund (NCPTF) . The 



NCPTF advocates for legislation by the United States 
Congress to establish a Peace Tax Fund. 

The purpose of Peace Tax Fund legislation is to: 

- Provide each individual the right not to be coerced 
into any form of participation in killing other human 
beings — ^whether that participation is physical or finan- 
cial. 

- Offer conscientious objectors the right to pay their 
full tax obligation without violating deeply held religious 
or ethical beliefs. 

- Give those who are conscientiously opposed to war 
because of religious or ethical beliefs the right not to 
have legal penalties imposed because of those beliefs. 

We believe all persons have these rights based in 
the freedom to exercise their beliefs according to the 
dictates of conscience. To that end, we support the 
National Campaign for a Peace Tax Fund and affirm the 
work it does on behalf of those who conscientiously 
object to payment of taxes for war. 

Petition Number: 21044-CSR517-U; GBCS. 
Human Rights 

Amend "New Issues in Human Rights," p. 517, The 
Book of Resolutions: 

New I 99 UC3 in Human Rights 

... This biblical poaaogc showa u9 that in our apirituol 
identity, we po s sess a God - given worth and dignity. The 
biblical We affirm that all persons are of equal 
worth in the sight of God because all are created 
in the image of God. Biblical tradition demands that 
we live in an interdependent relationship with God and 
our neighbor. That move s us to We must respond to 
human need at every community level. 

"Now therefore, if you will obey my voice and keep 
my covenant, you shall be my own possession among all 
people for all the earth is mine, and you shall be to me a 
Itingdom of priests and a holy nation."(Exodus 10 ! 5 -6 , 
Revised Standard Version) . 

"You shall love the Lord your God vnth all your 
heart, with all your soul, with all your strength and wth 
your mind and your neighbor as yourself. "(Luke 10 ! 27 - 

As covenant people of God who arc a part to this 
covenant , we are called to responsibility rather than 
privilege. 

God's vision. ..Human rights are holistic in nature 
and therefore indivisible in their s ocial, civil, political, 
cultural and economic, social, cultural, civil, and 
political aspects... 



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Further, As Christians, we receive and carryT-as 
Christiana, a mandate to seek justice and liberation. ?%at 
mandate coIIb us to safeguard and dlgnit>' of all pcraona, 
whether they are the oppressed or the oppressors by 
identifjang and eliminating the root causes of human 
rights violations throughout our global community. 
Isaiah calls us to "loose the bonds of injustice, to 
undo the thongs of the yoke, to let the oppressed 
go free, and to break every yoke." (Isaiah 58:6) 

Therefore, The United Methodist Church feki- 
forccs continues its commitment to human rights ftft4 
as grounded in God's covenant by critically assessing 
and safeguarding the following principles in human 
rights as defined in the Universal Declaration of 
Htunan Rights:... 

2) All persons have the right to the basic necessities 
of lif e, as defined in the United Nations 

Declaration of Human Rights . 

4) ...religious expression and practice. 

The United Nations has spoken strongly 
against racism as a human rights violation in the 
United Nations Declaration on the Elimination of 
All Forms of Racial Discrimination: 

Discrimination between human beings on the 
ground of race, color or ethnic origin is em offense 
to human dignity and shall be condemned as a 
denial of the principles of the Charter of the 
United Nations, as a violation of the human rights 
and fundamental freedoms proclaimed in the Uni- 
versal Declaration of Human Rights, as an obsta- 
cle to fiiendly and peaceful relations among na- 
tions and as a fact capable of disturbing peace and 
security among peoples. 

In addition, the United Nations has also de- 
fined sexism as a violation of human rights in the 
Declaration on the Elimination of Discrimination 
against Women: 

Discrimination against women, denying or 
limiting as it does their equality of rights with men, 
is fundamentally unjust and constitutes an offense 
against human dignity. 

As a people "committed to Christ" and "called to 
change," we are responsible for securing the integrity 
of our covenant in the midst of new imposing human 
rights developments. 

In this spirit, wW e call upon citizens within the 
church and society to critically analyze criticaUy trends 
and developments which may impinge upon adversely 
affect human rights. These include: 

1) The increase of capital intensive technology that 
destroys opportunities for productive and mean- 
ingful employment 



2) The intentional use of data banks to provide 
pervasive information imdermine rather than en- 
hance abundant living. 

4) The possible economic and political scape-goat- 
ing of such an "underclass" for technological and social 
displacement. The criterion of a "Fourth World" and its 
potential scapegoat for the social displacement resulting 
from technological advances. 

6) The growth of militarism and the imposition of 
military-like behavior on control over civilians. 

7) The increase of terrorism and the growth of less 
publicized racist white supremacist movements such 
as the neo-Nazi groups and paramilitary units, of the 
Ku Mux Klan, the Posse Comitatus, etc. and so - called 
"National Fronts" in Britain and France. 

8) In many countries Tthe decreasing civilian 
control in many countries of domestic and international 
policing and intelligence units as well as increasing 
surveillance of their own citizenry perceived imposed 
under the guise of a potential threat to national security. 

9) The conflict of rising expectations between 
meeting the basic needs of developing countries and 
the disproportionate sharing of global resources. 

History teaches us We are increasingly aware 
that militarism and greed can overwhelm and under- 
mine movements to secure human rights. Moreover, as 
humanity approaches the 2l8t Century the role of the 
church as advocate, healer, and servant of the poor and 
oppressed, including the indigenous people, is ncecs - 
safyrThe Chiu"ch is called to be an advocate for the 
human rights of all persons in the political, social 
and economic quest for justice and peace. In the 
political, social and economic quest for justice and 
peace, the insatiable demand for material gain requires 
the church to be an advocate for the human rights of all. 

Meanwhile As people of faith and hope, we com- 
mend thosepositivetrendsleftdiftgifBpetttswiiich con- 
tribute positively to the human rights movement. 
Among them: 

— ^The growing acceptance of universal standards 
for human rights. 

— ^The establishment of oi^nizations such as 
Amnesty International which documents, verifies, 
and publicizes pohtical imprisonment, torture, 
killings, and crimes against humanity. 

— ^The increasing consensus against war as a viable 
solution to international conflicts. 

— Recent moves to include Movement toward the 
inclusion of "basic human needs" criteria in interna- 
tional aid packages and financial aid programming. 



Church and Society 



157 



— The acknowledgment by the international com 
munity of a bona fide human role for the church. 

— ^The c s tabliahment growing importance of hu- 
man rights offices¥ftthin governments of acvcral nations 
around the world . 

— ^The growing emphasis on ti*e technology appro- 
priate to the cultural setting. 

We uphold the requirements advocated by the 
National Council of Churches to preserve and pro- 
tect human rights: 

1) Human rights require world peace; 

2) Human rights require a secure and sustain- 
able environment; 

3) Himian rights require sustainable human 
development; 

4) Hiunan rights require the preservation of 
communities; and 

5) Human rights require the preservation of 
religious liberty and freedom of conscience. 

We hereby call upon all governments to renew 
accept their obligation to uphold human rights by 
refraining from repreaaive repression, torture and vio- 
lence against all persona any person. We further call 
upon all governments to fulfill their positive obligations 
to human rights to ratifying and implementiof interna- 
tional conventions,... 

We call the Church to be a place of refuge for the 
"heavy laden" and uprooted of the global community. 
those who experience the violation of their human 
rights. It is the duty of Christians "to help create 
a worldwide conmiunity in which governments 
and people treat each other compassionately as 
members of one human family." 

While recognition and protection of human rights 
is an essential part of our Christian obligations, we must 
remember that human rights alone do not assure indi 
vidual redemption and wholeness. The Church must 
keep before the global community the claims of Christ 
upon humanity to seek lovingly to fulfill his mandate 
expressed in the Great Commission. 

Therefore, we call upon all members of The United 
Methodist Church to do all syithin their power to further 
these objectives. 



Petition Number: 21049-CS-R561-U; GBCS. 

Peace, The United Methodist Church and 

Delete "Christian Faith and Disarmament," p. 561; 
"Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty, p. 568; "Nuclear Dis- 
armament: The Zero Option," p. 600; and "Peace Col- 



leges," p. 612; and amend "Peace, The United Methodist 
Church and" p. 617: 

I. Disarmament 

One hard fact must be stated bluntiy ; the The arms 
race goes on;, the momentum of the race never slack - 
ens, and However, the danger of aholocaust is remains 
imminent as long as nations maintain nuclear 
weapons. Meanwhile, millions starve andr develofh 
ment stagnates. , and international cooperation is threat - 
ened. Increasingly sophisticated weapons systems ac - 
celerate arms spending and heighten anxieties without 
adding to the security of the nations. Again and again, 
regional tensions grow, conflicts erupt, and great pow - 
efs outside forces intervene to advance or protect their 
interests without regard to international law or human 
rights. 

True priorities... Yet the their availability of all of 
these is constantiy threatened because of by the over- 
riding priority given by governments to what is called 
"defense." 

If humanity is to move out of this period of futility 
and constant peril, the search for new weapons system s 
must be halted through comprehensive international 
agreements. — Moreover, — disarmament — negotiations 
should include all nations with substantial armaments 
systems. The vast stockpiles of nuclear bombs and con - 
ventional weapon s must be dismanticd under interna - 
tional supervision, and the resources being used for 
arms must be diverted to programs designed to affirm 
life rather than destroy it Serious consideration should 
be given by nations to unilateral initiatives which might 
stimulate the reaching of international agreement. 

We support disarmament initiatives that go 
beyond compliance with international treaties. In 
particular we ask that the nuclear powers disman- 
tie nuclear stockpiles to show good fiaith to the 
non-nuclear participants of the extended Non-Pro- 
liferation Treaty. We have rejected possession of 
nuclear weapons as a permanent basis for seciu*- 
ing and maintaining peace. Possession can no 
longer be tolerated even as a temporary expedient. 
We affirm the prophetic position of our bishops 
who said in their statement In Defense of Creation: 
"We say a clear and unconditional NO to nuclear 
war and to any use of nuclear weapons. We con- 
clude that nuclear deterrence is a position that 
cannot receive the Church's blessing." 

The time to test nuclear weapons is past. The 
Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty must include a 
prohibition on aU tests that release radiation. We 
condemn those nations that continue to conduct 
such tests. Their actions show they are not respon- 
sible members of the world community. We ask 
that measures such as embargoes, boycotts or 
other peaceful pressures be universally applied 
against nations that continue to test 



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At the same time nations must provide for 
more secure control of weapons-grade nuclear 
materials. It is clear deterrence comes from inter- 
national controls on materials from which bombs 
are made. 

We support the concept of nuclear-free zones 
where governments or peoples in a specific region 
band togedier to bar nuclear weapons from the 
area either by treaty or declaration. 

World public opinion justly condemns the use of 
chemical or biological weapons. Governments must re- 
nounce use of these particularly inhumane weapons as 
part of their national policy. 

We support treaty efforts to ban the develop- 
ment, trade and use of weapons that are inhu- 
mane, are excessively injurious and have indis- 
criminate effects. Such weapons include land 
mines, booby traps, weapons with non-detectable 
fragments, incendiary weapons and blinding laser 
weapons. 

We are also concerned about the use of inhu- 
mane weapons by civilian or military police. Hol- 
low point ("Diun-dum") or other bullets designed 
to maim are not acceptable weapons for use by 
civilian or mihtary forces. We support measiu^es 
that outlaw use of such weapons at all levels. 

We affirm peoples' movements directed to abolition 
of the tools of war. Governments must not impede public 
debate on this issue of universal concern. 

TTie goal of world disarmamen t, demanding de- 
mands a radical reordering of priorities afi4 coupled 
with an effective system of international peacemaking, 
peace keeping and peace building. The church 
must constantly keep that goal must be kept con - 
standy before peoples and government s by the church . 



n. Democracy and Freedom 

[Second paragraph] Action by governments.. .Un- 
less the prevailing oppression and denial of basic human 
rights are ended, violence on an increasing scale will 
continue to erupt in many nations, and may spread 
throughout the world. The human toll in such a conflict 
could be conflicts is enormous for they and could 
result in new oppression and further dehumanization. 

We are concerned for areas where oppression and 
discrimination take plac e, and specifically for Namibia 
and South Africa, where White minorities continue to 
opprc39 and diacriminatc against Black majorities 
through legal 3y9tcm3 . We, as United Methodist 
Christiiuis, must btiild the conditions for peace 
through development of confidence and trust be- 
tween peoples and governments. We are imalter- 
ably opposed to those who instill hate in one group 



for another. Governments or political factions must 
not use religious, class, racial or other differences 
as the means to achieve heinous poUtical purposes. 



This concern... 

III. The United Nations 

[Third paragraph] These achievements.. .Many na- 
tions, including the most powerful, participate in some 
programs only when those actiona do such action does 
not interfere with their national advantage... 

We believe the United Nations... 

[Substitute bullets for numbering:] 

• -It The Universal Declaration. ..International 
covenants and conventions which seek to 
implement the Declaration should must be 
universally ratified. 

• 3? Peace and world order... 

• St Greater use should be made of the International 
Court of Justice. Nations should remove any 
restrictions they have adopted which impair the 
court's effective functioning. 

• 4? Development agencies should not be dominated 
by the industrialined world. The industrialized 
world must not dominate development 
agencies. We support eEfforts to make 
controlling bodies of these such agencies more 
representativ e should be supported . 

• St We support the development and 
strengtiiening of ilntemational agencies designed 
to help nations or peoples escape from domination 
by other nations or transnational enterprises-mttst 
continue to be created and strengthened . 

• 6r Issues of food, cncrg>', raw materials, and other 
commodities arc grcady affected by economic and 
political considerations. Efforts in the United 
Nations to achieve new levels of justice in the world 
economic order should be considered, reviewed, 
and — supported. Economic and pohtical 
considerations greatly affect issues of food, 
energy, raw materials, and other 
commodities. We support efforts in the United 
Nations to achieve new levels of justice in the 
world economic order. 

• ?7 We support the concept of c€ollective action 
against threats to peace must be supported . Wars 
fought in the search for justice might well be 
averted or diminished if the nations of the world 
would work vigorously and in concert in scclcing to 
seek changes in oppressive political and economic 
systems. 



Church and Society 



159 



rV. World Trade and Economic Development 

[Third paragraph] In working toward that purpose, 
we believe these steps are needed:... 

Control of international monetary facilities should 
must be more equitably shared by all the nations, in- 
cluding the needy and less powerful... 

VI. Peace Research, Education, and Action 

The 1960 General Conference established the 
landmark study "The Christian Faith and War in 
the Nuclear Age." That study said, "The Christian 
Chtu'ch and the individual must accept responsi- 
bility for the creation of a climate of opinion in 
which creative changes can occur." It called work 
for these creative alternatives, "Our mission field 
as we live as disciples of the Prince of Peace." 

In order to create such a climate of concili- 
ation and compromise, wWe call upon The United 
Methodist Church, including its agencies and insti- 
tutions of higher education, in the light of its histori- 
cal teachings and its commitment to peace and self-de- 
velopment of peoples to: 

1. Seek the establishment of educational institutions 
devoted to the study of peace (auch as the National 
Academy of Peace and Conflict Resolution) . 

2. Develop alternatives to vocations that work 
against peace and support individuals in their quest. 

4. Affirm and employ methods that build confidence 
and trust between peoples and countries, including 
training in multi-cultural understanding and ap- 
preciation of differences, rejecting all promotion of 
hatred and mistrust 



Petition Number: 21050-CS-R633-U; GBCS. 

Ratification of United Nations Covenants and 
Conventions by the United States 

Delete "Ratification of Human Rights Covenants 
and Conventions," p. 633 and replace with new text: 

The United Methodist Chtu'ch commends the 
Senate of the United States for actions which com- 
pleted ratification of the following htunan rights 
instruments and allowed its government to de- 
posit instruments of ratification with the Secretary 
General of the United Nations, wiio received them 
on the following dates: 

— The International Convention on the Pre- 
vention and Punishment of Genocide on Novem- 
ber 25, 1988; 

— The International Covenant on Civil and 
Political Rights on June 8, 1992; 



— The Convention against Torture and other 
Cruel, Inhuman, or Degrading Treatment or Pun- 
ishment; and 

— The International Convention on the Elimi- 
nation of All Forms of Racial Discrimination on 
October 21, 1994. 

The Senate has not pursued those steps which 
will complete ratification of three remaining hu- 
man rights instruments that have been signed by 
the President 

— The International Covenant on Economic, 
Social and Cultural Rights was signed by Presi- 
dent Jimmy Carter on October 5, 1977, and trans- 
mitted to the United States Senate; 

— The Convention on the Elimination of all 
Forms of Discrimination Against Women was 
signed on behalf of President Carter in Copenha- 
gen on July 17, 1980, and transmitted to the 
United States Senate; and 

— The Convention on the Rights of the Child 
was signed on behalf of President Clinton in New 
York on February 16, 1995, and transmitted to 
the United States Senate. 

The Senate also has not acted upon the follow- 
ing conventions: 

— The Convention on Biodiversity was signed 
on June 4, 1993, on behalf of President Clinton 
and transmitted to the United States Senate; and 

— The Treaty on the Law of the Sea was signed 
on behalf of President Clinton on July 29, 1994, 
and transmitted to the United States Senate. 

It is imperative that the United States Senate 
act prompdy to give its "advice and consent" to the 
ratification of these instruments. 



Petition Number: 2002&-CS-NonDis-O;WYO. 

The Embargo against Cuba 

Whereas, the Social Principles of the United Meth- 
odist Church state that, "We hold governments respon- 
sible for the protection of the rights of the people.. .to the 
guarantee of the rights to adequate food, clothing, shel- 
ter, education, and health care"; 

Whereas, the total embargo of trade with Cuba (in 
effect for over 30 years) has created vast shortages of 
food supplies, building repair materials, personal care 
items, clothing, medicine, and health care equipment; 

Whereas, Cuba remains the only country against 
whom the United States maintains a total trade embargo 
(including humanitarian aid); 



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Whereas the United Methodist Homes of the Wyo- 
ming Conference is developing a partner relationship 
with Hogar Cristiano Metodista (a small nursing home 
facility operated by the Methodist Church of Cuba) to 
improve the quality of health care for its residents 
through training, an increased supply of medicine, and 
the updating of medical equipment; 

Whereas, the only means currently of delivering 
these desperately needed items is limited to personally 
carrying the items in very limited quantities; 

Whereas the government of the United States has 
in recent years strengthened its commercial and diplo- 
matic relations with Vietnam, and has also increased 
contacts and negotiations with North Korea, inde- 
pendently of their foreign policy which contradicts that 
of the United States; 

Whereas the lifting of the economic embargo 
against Cuba, a member of the Caribbean Common 
Market (CARICOM) would help relieve tensions in the 
Caribbean while creating a new and important market 
for American industry and agriculture; 

Whereas the Council of Churches of Cuba of which 
the Methodist Church of Cuba is a member, the Cuban 
Conference of Roman Catholic Bishops, and several 
other international and U.S. religious bodies such as 
theUnited Church of Christ, the Presbyterian Church 
(USA) , and the American Baptist Churches have passed 
resolutions in favor of lifting the embargo; 

Whereas, more than two hundred and fifty Chris- 
tians from approximately 23 Protestant denominations 
and diverse ecumenical movements met in 1994 with 
leaders of the Cuban Communist Party and of the gov- 
ernment, at the highest levels, to discuss both accom- 
plishments and shortcomings of the revolutionary proc- 
ess; and to encourage the government to take measures 
that guarantee a greater respect for and the promotion 
of human rights; 

Therefore, be it resolved, that the 1996 General 
Conference of the United Methodist Church request 
that the President and Congress of the United States 
cooperate to: 

1) repeal the Cuban Democracy Act of 1992 (22 
U.S.C. 6001 et seq.) , as well as the 1994 tightening of 
travel restrictions that prevent the normal working rela- 
tionship between religious communities in Cuba and the 
United States; 

2) resume normal diplomatic relations between the 
government of Cuba and the United States; 

Be it further resolved, that this resolution be advo- 
cated by the Council of Bishops, the General Board of 
Church and Society, and the General Board of Global 
Ministries. 



Be it further resolved that the secretary of the 1996 
General Conference send a copy of this resolution to 
William Clinton, President of the United States. 



Petition Number: 20031-CS-R634-U;WIS, NEB, RKM, 
NYK,NIL. 

Recognition of Cuba 

Amend "Recognition of Cuba," TJie Book of Resolu- 
tions, pp. 634-636, beginning with the second paragraph: 

"God's world is one world." The Social Principles 
requires us to make the community of God a reality as 
we "pledge ourselves to seek the meaning of the gospel 
in all issues that divide people and threaten the growth 
of world community." We believe that "God's world 
is one world." However, sSuch a world cannot exist 
when nations refuse to give diplomatic recognition to 
one another. 

For over-30 32 years the government of the United 
States has not maintained diplomatic relations with the 
government of Cuba and has instead pursued an eco- 
nomic embargo prohibiting sRy all kinds of trade with 
Cuba. The Democracy Act of 1992 (no. 22 U.S.C. 
6001 et seq.) has tightened the embargo restric- 
tions by penalizing other countries if their ships 
stop in Cuba. This policy has resulted continues to 
result in the loss of an important commercial market 
and trade partner for the United States, and in the 
heightening heightened ©f tensions in the Caribbean. 
The objectives sought by the proponents of this policy 
in the cold War era were to force a change in Cuban 
foreign policy and to halt the growth and development 
of Soviet influence in that country. 

It is now clear that the embargo policy has not 
succeeded with those objectives. If anything, its most 
evident result of the embargo has been not only t© 
fofeethat it forced Cuba to an even closer political and 
military reliance on the former Soviet Union, but it has 
also increased the suffering of the children and the 
elderly due to lack of essential medicines and 
food. The Cold War is over, the socialist block of 
Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union has disap- 
peared and no longer exercises any influence on 
Cuba's foreign policy or poses any threat to the 
United States. 

Whereas, the Methodist Church in 1964.... 

Whereas, the government of the United States is the 
only major Western country pursuing a policy of non-re- 
lations with Cuba, while Canada, France, Great Britain, 
West Germany, Japan, Mexico, Argentina, Bolivia and 
almost all other countries of the western alliance main- 
tain normal diplomatic and/or economic relations with 
Cuba; and 

Whereas, the General Assembly of the United 
Nations has several times voted overwhelmingly in 



Church and Society 



161 



Cavor of the United States lifting the embargo and all 
restrictions against Cuba; and 

Whereas, the government of the United States has 
in recent years strengthened its commercial and diplo- 
matic relations with other Communist countries auch as 
the Soviet Union itself, China, Hungary, Poland, and 
Romania, V ietnam and has also increased contacts 
and negotiations with North Korea, independently 
of their foreign policy, which differs and often collides 
w4th-contradicts that of the United States; and 

Whereas, the Reagan administration declared that 
the United States wiH was not going to use food.... 

Whereas, the lifting of the economic embargo 
against Cuba, a member of the Caribbean Common 
Market (CAJRICOM), would help relieve tensions in 
the Caribbean while creating a new and important mar- 
ket for American industry and agriculture especially at 
a time of high unemployment in this country ; and 

Whereas, the Ecumenical Council of Cuba (now 
Council of Churches of Cuba) of which the Methodist 
Church of Cuba is a member, the Cuban Conference of 
Roman Catholic Bishops, and several other international 
8 9 well fl s and U.S. religious bodies such as the United 
Church of Christ, the Presbyterian Church GJSA), and 
the American Baptist Churches have passed resolutions 
in favor of lifting the embargo; and 

Whereas, the Ecumenical Council of Cuba has 
stated, "the space for freedom and action for the 
work of the Chiu'ch and of Christians in Cuba has 
been concertized in political and juridical deci- 
sions which have allowed for the growth and ex- 
pansion of all churches and the possibility of bet- 
ter work for both within and with the rest of civil 
society"; and 

Whereas, more than two himdred and fifty 
Christians from approximately 23 Protestant de- 
nominations and diverse ecumenical movements 
met in 1994 with leaders of the Cuban Commu- 
nist Party and of the government, at the highest 
levels, to discuss both accomplishments emd 
shortcomings of the revolutionary process; and to 
encourage the government to take measures that 
guarantee a greater respect for and the promotion 
of human rights; 

Therefore, be it resolved, that The United Method- 
ist Church, from its Christian and humanitarian perspec- 
tive, inspired by the love of God and the historic 
Methodist commitment to peace and social jus- 
tice, and in light of historic changes with the end 
of the Cold War, hereby petitions the government of 
the United States to lift its economic embargo against 
Cuba and to seek negotiations with the Cuban govern - 
ment for the purpose of resuming normal diplomatic 
relations, requests of the President and Congress 
of the United States: 1) the repeal of the Cuban 



Democracy Act of 1992 (22 U.S.C. 6001 et seq.), 
as well as the 1994 tightening of travel restrictions 
that prevent the normal working relationship be- 
tween religious communities in Cuba and the 
United States; 2) the resumption of normal diplo- 
matic relations between the government of Cuba 
and the United States; 

Be it further resolved, that the General Con- 
ference requests the Council of Bishops and the 
Genereil Boards of Church and Society and Global 
Ministries of The United Methodist Church, as 
well as the National Council of the Chiu-ches of 
Christ in the United States, to advocate with the 
President and Congress of the United States for 
the aforementioned requests. 

Petition Number: 20863-CS-R634-U; Methodist Federa- 
tion for Social Action, CPA 

Recognition of Cuba 

Amend "Recognition of Cuba," p. 634-636: 

[Second paragraph] "God's world i s one world." 
The Social Principles.. .the growth of the world commu- 
nity." We believe that "God's world is one world." 
However, sSuch a world cannot exist... 

For over 30 32 years the government.. embargo 
prohibiting any all kinds of trade with Cuba. The De- 
mocracy Act of 1992 (#22 U.S.C. 6001 at seq.) 
has tightened the embargo restrictions by penaliz- 
ing other cotmtries if their ships stop in Cuba. This 
policy...and in the heightening heightened of tensions 
in the Caribbean. The objectives sought by the propo- 
nents of this policy in the Cold War era were to force 
a change... 

It is now clear that the embargo policy has not 
succeeded with those objectives. If anything, its most 
evident result of the embargo has been not only to 
force that it forced Cuba to an even closer political and 
military reliance on the former Soviet Union, but it has 
also increased the suffering of the children and the 
elderly due to lack of essential medicines and 
food. The Cold War is over, the socialist block of 
Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union has disap- 
peared and no longer exercises any influence on 
Cuba's foreign policy or poses any threat to the 
United States. 

...Whereas, the government of the United States is 
the only major Western country.. .Mexico, Brazil, Ar- 
gentina, Bolivia.. .economic relations with Cuba; and 

Whereas, the General Assembly of the United 
Nations has several times voted overwhelmingly in 
favor of the United States lifting the embargo and 
all restrictions against Cuba; and 



162 



DCA Advance Edition 



Whereas, the government of the United States has 
in recent years strengthened its commercial and diplo- 
matic relations with other Communist countries such as 
the Soviet Union itself, China, Hungary, Poland, and 
Romania, Vietnam, and has also increased contacts 
and negotiations with North Korea independently 
of their foreign policy which differs and often collides 
wi#» which contradicts that of the United States; and 

Whereas, the Reagan administration declared that 
the United States will was not going to use food as a 
foreign policy instrument... 

Whereas, lifting of the economic embargo against 
Cuba, a member of the Caribbean Common Market 
(CARICOM), would help relieve tensions- cspccially at 
a time of high unemployment in this country" ; and 

Whereas, the Ecumenical Council of Cuba (now 
Council of Churches of Cuba) of which. ..and several 
other international as well as and U.S. religious bod- 
ies... resolutions in favor of lifting the embargo; and 

Whereas, the Ecxunenical Council of Cuba has 
stated "the space for freedom and action for the 
work of the Church £md of Christians in Cuba has 
been concretized in political and juridical deci- 
sions which have allowed for the growth and ex- 
pansion of all churches and the possibiUty of bet- 
ter work for both within and with the rest of civil 
society"; and 

Whereas, more than two hundred and fifty 
Christians from approximately 23 Protestant de- 
nominations and diverse ecumenical movements 
met in 1994 with leaders of the Cuban Commu- 
nist Party and of the government, at the highest 
levels, to discuss both accomplishments and 
shortcomings of the revolutionary process and to 
encourage the government to take measures that 
guarantee a greater respect for and the promotion 
of human rights; 

TTierefore, be it resolved, that The United Method- 
ist Church, from its Christian and humanitarian perspec- 
tive, inspired by the love of God and the historic 
Methodist commitment to peace and social jus- 
tice, and in light of historic changes with the end 
of the Cold War, hereby petitions the government of 
the United States to lift its economic embargo against 
Cuba and to seek negotiations with the Cuban govern - 
ment for the purpose of resuming normal diplomatic 
relations requests of the President and Congress of 
the United States: 1) the repeal of the Cuban De- 
mocracy Act of 1992 (22 IIS.C. 6001 et seq), as 
weU as the 1994 tightened travel restrictions that 
prevent the normal working relationship between 
reUgious commimities in Cuba and the United 
States; 2) the resumption of normal diplomatic 
relations between the government of Cuba and the 
United States; 



Be it further resolved, that the General Con- 
ference requests the Council of Bishops and the 
General Boards of Chiu-ch jmd Society and Global 
Ministries of The United Methodist Church, as 
well as the National Coimcil of Churches of Christ 
in the United States, to advocate with the Presi- 
dent and Congress of the United States for the 
aforementioned requests. 

Petition Number: 21051-CS-R643-U; GBCS. 

Terrorism 

Amend 'Terrorism," p. 643: 

^VHEREAS, tThe increase in terrorism from the 
1970's to 1000 through the present has caused a fear 
and desperation among international people every- 
where that creates a sense of hopelessness and instabil- 
ity and reveals the weakness in the present world system 
of international peace, and securityt«ft4 at home. 

The image of God and the sacrifice of Christ 
bestow a worth and dignity that cannot be right- 
fulty ignored or violated by any human institution 
or social movement. For this reason we condemn 
all acts of terrorism with no exception for the tar- 
get or the soiu"ce. 

WHEREA S7 There is no significant difference be- 
tween "state terrorism," as the "overkill" response of a 
state, and group terrorism, whether in the interna- 
tional arena or on the home front inasmuch as the 
innocent suffer; 

THEREFORE, Witii these truths in mind it is 
important that we, as United Methodist Christiansr 
we: 

1. Will examine Examine critically the causes of 
terrorism including and nations' national and inter- 
national involvement with it 

2. Firmly support the United Nations as an agency 
for conflict resolution and as a viable alternative to #ie 
resort resorting to war and/or terrorism. 

3. Stand against terrorist acts in the forms of 
retahation or capital ptmishment 

34. Urge the President of the United States to 
repudiate violence and to adhere to the statement that 
retaliation could be a terrorist act in itself and the killing 
and victimizing of innocent people. 

4 5. Oppose the use of indiscriminate military force 
to combat terrorism except as a final resort, especially... 
S 6. Condemn the use of extremist tactics... 

€ 7. Direct the General Board... 

8. Continue to support the U.S. ban on assault 
rifles, as they are the weapons of choice by indi- 



Church and Society 



163 



viduals and organizations implementing terrorist 
activities both at home and abroad. 



Petition Number: 21052-CS-R648-U; GBCS. 

In Support of the United Nations 
Amend "In Support of the United Nations," p. 648: 

Thi s General Conference The United Methodist 

Church affirms its historic support for the United Na- 
tions. Today wW e rejoice that since 1945... 

• Provided mechanisms for the peaceful settlement 
of disputes. 

• Provided an arena for promotion of a just and 
equitable world economic system. 

• Provided — assistance — through — United — Nations 
Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organigation, 
United Nations Development Program, United 
Nations Childrcns Fund (U>JICEF), World Health 
Organigation, and its other agencies to persons who 
arc usually neglected. 

• Established peacekeeping forces in troubled areas. 

• Developed principles of peace-building. 

• Defused big power confrontations. 

• Provided assistance through United Nations 
Educational, Scientific and Cultural 
Organization (UNESCOt . United Nations 
Development Program (UNDP> . United 
Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF), World 
Health Organization (WHO) , and its other 
agencies to persons who are usually 
neglected. 

• Provided a forum for discussion of difficult issues, 
such as racism, population and decolonization. 

• Promoted just and equitable world social and 
economic systems. 

• Established internationally accepted 
standards of human rights for all persons, 
including women and children. 

• Forged international treaties on Ozone, 
Climate Change, Bio-diversity, and The Law of 
the Sea, and sponsored siunmits of heads of 
state and government on issues of children, 
environment and social development. 

• Brought nations togetiier to coordinate the 
batdes against smallpox, polio, childhood 
mortality, inadequate nutrition and 
HIV/AIDS. 



• Provided a means of coordination and 
commimication for world Non-Governmental 
Organizations (NGO's). 

International relations are entering a new era. Gov- 
ernments turn to the United Nations as they recognize 
that they must address theif problems multilaterallyr 
through t¥he use of consultation and compromise as 
solutions intensifies . Nations acting together... 

However, wW e are not convinced.. .Nations might 
still return to unilateral acts of violence... The arms 
build-up has decreased but it has not ceased. Regional 
civil and ethnic wars wiH continue to break out... 

We encourage the governments of the world to 
discard old s ystems of nationalistic self will and to let the 
ideals and visions of the Charter of the United Nations 
serve as their guide to a new spirit of international 
cooperation. 

The pursuit of peace is thwarted when media-pro- 
moted falsehoods misunderstandings about the pur- 
pose and possibilities of the United Nations are widely 
promoted disseminated and believed. Therefore, we 
commend to the churches a wider study of the United 
Nations in order that Christians might be enabled to 
work in unity for peace and ju s tice in the world. 

We encoxu"age the governments of the world to 
say no to nationalistic self-will, to say yes to the 
ideals and visions of the Charter of the United 
Nations, and to let it serve as their guide to a new 
spirit of international cooperation. 

To that end: 

1. We commend to the churches a wider study 
of the United Nations in order that Christians 
might be enabled to work in unity for peace and 
justice in the world. 

i 2. We reaffirm decisions of the General Confer- 
ence beginning in 1944 to establish "an international 
office of education and publicity for peace." These deci - 
sions resulted in establishment of Supported by those 
decisions the church established the Methodist Of- 
fice for the United Nations and, in 1963, in construction 
of constructed the Church Center for the United Na- 
tions. 

3 3. We particularly commend...the work of the 
United Nations as it grapples with the work strives for 
peace. 

4. We affirm and support the United Method- 
ist Office for the United Nations as a facilitator and 
participant in the NGO network. 

S 5. We also reaffirm the importance of celebrating 
the signing entry into force of the Charter of the United 
Nations on October 24, 1945, with an emphasis in local 



164 



DCA Advance Edition 



churches on World Order United Nations Sunday, 
observed on that date or the Sunday preceding it. 

6. We call upon United Methodists to encour- 
age tiieir governments to strengthen tiie U.N. by 
fulfilling all treaty and financial obligations so that 
it may more effectively relieve the suffering of mil- 
lions through better health, protect our planef s 
environment, promote human rights, and bring 
about genuine and lasting peace in the world. 

Other Resolutions 

Petition Number: 21039-CS-NonDis-O; GBCS. 

Caring Communities - The United Methodist 
Mental Illness Network 

The mission to bring all persons into a community 
of love is central to the teachings of Christ. We gather 
as congregations in witness to that mission, welcoming 
and nurturing those who assemble with us. 

Yet, we confess that in our humanity we have some- 
times failed to minister in love to persons and families 
with mental illness. We have allowed barriers of igno- 
rance, fear, and pride to separate us from those who 
most need our love and the nurturing support of com- 
munity. 

To support United Methodist congregations in their 
goal to reach out to persons and families with mental 
illness, the General Board of Church and Society estab- 
lished the United Methodist Mental Illness Network. It 
is a network of "Caring Communities," congregations 
and communities in covenant relationship with persons 
and families with mental illness. 

United Methodist congregations, annual confer- 
ences, jurisdictions, and boards are called to join the 
United Methodist Mental Illness Network: 

• to educate their members about mental illness; 

• to enter into a covenant relationship of 
understanding and love with persons and families 
with mental illness, in order to nurture them; and to 
reach out to the larger community. 



Petition Number: 20228-CS-NonDis-O;CNV, NEB, 
NIL, NIN. 

Tobacco Marketing by Philip Morris 
and RIR Nabisco 

The United Methodist Church and its predecessor 
denominations have a long history of witness against the 
use and marketing of tobacco products. 

In our Social Principles "we recommend total absti- 
nence from the use of tobacco" and "recognize the 
harmful effects of passive smoke and support the restric- 



tion of smoking in public areas and work places." ("J 
72J). 

In 1992, we called upon United Methodists to "work 
with local, state, and federal government repre- 
sentatives on legislation to limit advertisement of alco- 
hol and tobacco" (Confronting the Drug Crisis), ex- 
pressing our deep concern about the promotion of 
tobacco products through advertising: 

"We are especially concerned about the portrayal of 
smoking in connection with commercial advertising. We 
commend the suspension of cigarette advertising on 
radio and television. Smoking in other advertisements 
is still depicted in ways which identify it with physical 
and social maturity, attractiveness, and success. We 
support the Federal Trade Commission's rules requir- 
ing health warning statements in cigarette packaging." 
{Book of Resolutions, p. 234.) 

"We are also concerned that the tobacco industry is 
implementing marketing sfrategies that focus on the 
sales of tobacco in developing countries." {Book of Reso- 
lutions, p. 235.) 



The resolution made this far-reaching proposal: 

"We recommend the prohibition of commercial ad- 
vertising of tobacco products in order to reduce entice- 
ment toward use of a proven health hazard." {Book of 
Resolutions, p. 235) 

Since 1992, the marketing of tobacco in developing 
countries has intensified. The resistance of the tobacco 
industry to health regulations has hardened. The evi- 
dence of the human suffering due to tobacco use has 
continued to mount, and the denials and equivocation of 
tobacco industry leaders on this urgent health issue 
have astounded and alarmed the public. Tobacco com- 
panies have become owners and marketers of many 
leading food brands. 

The industry leaders are Philip Morris, which sells 
Marlboro, Chesterfield, Merritt, Lark, Ambassador, 
L&M, Parliament, Alpine, Cambridge, Merit, Bristol, 
Bucks, Benson & Hedges, and Virginia Slims cigarettes 
while marketing many common food products, includ- 
ing Kraft, General Foods, Oscar Mayer, Miller Brewing, 
Post Cereals, Entenmann's, Jell-0, Log Cabin, Maxwell 
House, Kool-Aid, Uncle Ben's, Country Time, Miracle 
Whip, Parkay, Cracker Barrel, Tang and Velveeta, and 
RJR Nabisco, which produces Nabisco Food Products 
while enticing untold numbers of young people into 
tobacco use through Joe Camel cartoon advertising. 

Public concern about the marketing strategies of 
the tobacco industry, especially as they affect children 
and youth and persons in developing counfries, has 
generated a growing grassroots movement of education 
and action, coordinated by INFACT. 



Church and Society 



165 



Therefore, the General Conference resolves: 

1. To commend its General Board of Pensions for 
its longtime exclusion of tobacco manufacturers from its 
portfolio of securities and asks it to intensify dialogue 
with public media in which it is part owner and which 
carries advertising or promotion of tobacco products; 

2. To ask all United Methodist agencies and related 
institutions to establish purchasing policies that take 
into account the church's Social Principles and resolu- 
tions on tobacco concerns and, specifically, to consider 
the role of Philip Morris and RJR Nabisco in tobacco 
marketing as a factor in any decision as to whether to 
buy a food product manufactured by Philip Morris or 
RJR Nabisco; 

3. To instruct the United Methodist Association of 
Health and Welfare Ministries and Board of Higher 
Education and Ministry to communicate, interpret, and 
advocate for this concern with their affiliated institu- 
tions; 

4. To ask all local churches, annual conferences, and 
church members also to take into account the church's 
position on tobacco use and marketing when making 
decisions about purchasing food products from Philip 
Morris and RJR Nabisco; 

5. To direct the General Board of Church and Soci- 
ety to communicate this resolution to the tobacco com- 
panies, serve as continuing advocate of the United Meth- 
odist position within The United Methodist Church and 
with the companies, and monitor the implementation of 
this resolution for report at the next General Confer- 
ence; and 



6. To request the General Board of Church and Soci- 
ety to explore the institution of a formal United Meth- 
odist boycott of all Philip Morris and RJR Nabisco 
products using the "Guideline for Initiating or Joining 
an Economic Boycott" adopted in 1988, and make a 
specific recommendation regarding such a boycott at 
the next General Conference. 



Petition Number: 20861-CS-NonDis-O; Methodist Fed- 
eration for Social Action, CPA. 

Tobacco Marketing by Philip Morris 
and RJR Nabisco 

The United Methodist Church and its predecessor 
denominations have a long history of witness against the 
use and marketing of tobacco products. 

In our Social Principles "we recommend total absti- 
nence from the use of tobacco" and "recognize the 
harmful effects of passive smoke and support the restric- 
tion of smoking in public areas and workplaces." (^72J) . 



In 1992, we called upon United Methodists to "work 
with local, state, and federal government repre- 
sentatives on legislation to limit advertisement of alco- 
hol and tobacco" (Confronting the Drug Crisis), ex- 
pressing our deep concern about the promotion of 
tobacco products tiirough advertising. 

"We are especially concerned about the portrayal of 
smoking in connection with commercial advertising. We 
commend the suspension of cigarette advertising on 
radio and television. Smoking in other advertisements 
is still depicted in ways which identify it with physical 
and social maturity, attractiveness, and success. We 
support the Federal Trade Commission's rules requir- 
ing health warning statements in cigarette packaging." 

"We are also concerned that the tobacco industry is 
implementing marketing strategies that focus on the 
sales of tobacco in developing countries." (Drug and 
Alcohol Concerns) 

The resolution made this far-reaching proposal: 

"We recommend the prohibition of commercial ad- 
vertising of tobacco products in order to reduce entice- 
ment toward use of a proven health hazard." (p. 235) 

Since 1992, the marketing of tobacco in developing 
countries has intensified. The resistance of the tobacco 
industry to health regulations has hardened. The evi- 
dence of the human suffering due to tobacco use has 
continued to mount, and the denials and equivocation of 
tobacco industry leaders on this urgent health issue 
have astounded and alarmed the public. Tobacco com- 
panies have become owners and marketers of many 
leading food brands. 

The industry leaders are Philip Morris, which sells 
Marlboro, Chesterfield, Maretti, Lark, Ambassador, 
L&M Parliament, Alpine, Cambridge, Merit, Bristol, 
Bucks, Benson & Hedges, and Virginia Slims cigarettes 
while marketing many common food products, includ- 
ing Kraft, General Foods, Oscar Mayer, Miller Brewing, 
Post Cereals, Entenmann's, Jell-0, Log Cabin, Maxwell 
House, Kool-Aid, Uncle Ben's, Country Time, Miracle 
Whip, Parkay, Cracker Barrel, Tang, and Velveeta; and 
RJR Nabisco, which produces Nabisco products and 
many others, while enticing untold numbers of young 
people into tobacco use through Joe Camel cartoon 
advertising. 

Public concern about the marketing strategies of 
the tobacco industry, especially as they effect children 
and youth and persons in developing countries, has 
generated a growing grassroots movement of education 
and action, coordinated by INFACT. 

In view of the urgency of this issue. The United 
Methodist Church: 

A. Commends its General Board of Pensions for its 
longtime exclusion of tobacco manufacturers from its 



166 



DCA Advance Edition 



portfolio of securities and asks it to intensify dialogue 
with public media in which it is part owner and which 
carries advertising or promotion of tobacco products; 

B. Asks all United Methodist agencies and related 
institutions to establish purchasing policies that take 
into account the church's Social Principles and resolu- 
tions on tobacco concerns and, specifically, to consider 
the role of Philip Morris and RJR Nabisco in tobacco 
marketing as a factor in any decision as to whether to 
buy a food product manufactured by Philip Morris or 
KJR Nabisco; 

C. Instructs the United Methodist Association of 
Health and Welfare Ministries and Board of Higher 
Education and Ministry to communicate, interpret, and 
advocate for this concern with their affiliated institu- 
tions; 

D. Asks all local churches, annual conferences, and 
church members also to take into account the church's 
position on tobacco use and marketing when making 
decisions about purchasing food products from Philip 
Morris and RJR Nabisco, informing these companies of 
our desire to strengthen their business enterprises in 
other products to make them less dependent on to- 
bacco. This cannot be done unless these companies 
show good faith intention to withdraw tobacco products 
from the market; 

E. Directs the General Board of Church and Society 
to communicate this resolution to the tobacco compa- 
nies, serve as continuing advocate of the United Meth- 
odist position within The United Methodist Church and 
with the companies, and monitor the implementation of 
this resolution for report at the next General Confer- 
ence; and 



F. Requests the General Board of Church and Society 
to explore the institution of a formal United Methodist 
boycott of all Philip Morris and RJR Nabisco products, 
following the "Guidelines for Initiating or Joining an 
Economic Boycott" adopted in 1988, and make a spe- 
cific recommendation regarding such a boycott at the 
next General Conference. 



Petition Number: 21042-CS-NonDis-O; GBCS. 

Tobacco Marketing by Philip Morris 
and RJR Nabisco 

The United Methodist Church and its predecessor 
denominations have a long history of witness against the 
use and marketing of tobacco products. There is over- 
whelming evidence linking cigarette smoking with lung 
cancer, cardio-vascular diseases, emphysema, chronic 
bronchitis, and related illnesses. 

We are outraged by the use of marketing tech- 
niques aimed at children by leading cigarette manufac- 
turers. Two specific companies using marketing strate- 



gies aimed at children are Philip Morris, which sells 
Marlboro cigarettes, and RJR Nabisco, which sells 
Camel cigarettes. 

Therefore, as people of faith who believe our bodies 
are temples of the living God (ICorinthians 6:13-20), we: 

A. Call on the General Board of Church and Society 
to maintain and publish a current list of consumer prod- 
ucts produced by Philip Morris and RJR Nabisco so 
United Methodists are made aware of their indirect 
support of the tobacco industry; 

B. Commend the General Board of Pensions and 
Health Benefits for its long standing exclusion of to- 
bacco manufacturers from its investment portfolio and 
ask it to challenge public media in its portfolio not to 
carry advertisements and promotion of tobacco prod- 
ucts; 

C. Ask all United Methodist agencies and related 
institutions to take into account the church's social prin- 
ciples and tobacco concerns and, specifically, to con- 
sider the role of Philip Morris and RJR Nabisco in 
tobacco marketing as a factor in any decision in purchas- 
ing food products manufactured by them; 

D. Request the United Methodist Association of 
Health and Welfare Ministries, the General Board of 
Global Ministries and the General Board of Higher 
Education and Ministry to communicate, interpret and 
advocate for this concern with their affiliated institu- 
tions; 

E. Ask all local churches and annual conferences to 
educate their membership about the tobacco industry 
marketing tactics aimed at children. It is equally impor- 
tant we understand the connection between our pur- 
chasing food products and our indirect support of the 
tobacco industry; 

F. Request the General Board of Church and Soci- 
ety to explore productive measures aimed at stopping 
tobacco companies from marketing cigarettes and other 
tobacco products to children. 



Petition Number: 21041-CS-NonDis-O; GBCS. 

Observance of Health Care Sabbaths 

In 1994 the Interreligious Health Care Access Cam- 
paign inaugurated the observance of a Health Care 
Sabbath by persons of faith as a symbol of their faithful- 
ness to the goal of health care for all. Rather than 
specifying a particular date for this observance, the 
Campaign encouraged communions and congregations 
to select a Sabbath date that reflected their individual 
commitment to issues of health and wholeness. In sup- 
port of this interfaith effort and in faithful witness to the 
beliefs articulated in the United Methodist resolutions 
"Health and Wholeness," "Universal Access to Health 
Care in the United States and Related Territories," 



Church and Society 



167 



"Health for All by the Year 2000," The United Methodist 
Church calls congregations to designate one Sunday 
during the calendar year for the observance of a "Health 
Care Sabbath." 

The Health Care Sabbath is a day of rejoicing and 
reflection. It is a time for thanksgiving for the health and 
well-being enjoyed by many in our world community and 
thanksgiving for the diverse care-givers who minister to 
our needs. It is a time to reflect on those who are sick, 
who struggle with chronic illnesses, who lack access to 



the health care services they need, and who are denied 
those basic elements essential to achieving health. It is 
a time to focus on our belief that health care is a right 
and a responsibility, public and private. It is a time to 
challenge our communities of faith to seek their role in 
making "Health Care for All" a reality. 

To assist congregations in their observance of a 
Health Care Sabbath, resources will be made available 
by the General Board of Church and Society. 



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Conferences 



THE GENERAL CONFERENCE OF THE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 



Volume 1 



Nashville, Tennessee 



A Report 
on The Global Nature of The United Methodist Church 



The Council of Bishops of The United Methodist Church 

(Progress report of the Council of Bishops on the Study of the Global Nature of the Church 
to the 1996 General Conference) 



Petition Number: 21718-CO-NonDis-0$; COB 
Introduction 

1. The Council of Bishops was asked by the 1992 
General Conference to study the global nature of the 
Church. The task given to the Council of Bishops is in 
the following resolution: 

1409*GJ074 

Subject: 74e Global Nature of The United 

Metiiodist Church 

Whereas, there must be developed a truly global 
church which has an integrity which affords dignity for all 
parts of The United Methodist Church; our church must 
be an expression of the global nature of our church mem- 
bership: "A member of a local United Methodist church is 
a member of the total United Methodist connection." (f 
210); and 

Whereas, there must be equity (parity) between what 
are now called central conferences and jurisdictional con- 
ferences; and 

Whereas, we must provide for connectional unity with 
the flexibility and freedom for meeting regional needs; and 

Whereas, we must redefine some General Conference 
responsibilities as regional ones; much of the current Gen- 
eral Conference agenda is focused exclusively on United 
States issues and needs; at least some of this agenda could 
be handled in a North American Regional Conference, 
just as similar regional agenda could be addressed in other 
regional conferences; and 

Whereas, we must be sensitive to how God seeks to 
manifest the Gospel in each unique culture and nation; 



we must also maintain a vital global connection in order 
to prevent both narrow parochialism and detrimental 
regionalism; and 

Whereas, our global vision for The United Methodist 
Church includes, but is not limited to, the following: 

1. Provision of a means by which the United Methodist 
family can live and serve together in a common dignity 
and respect as together we respond to the mission of Jesus 
Christ. 

2. A serious responsiveness to the unique needs and 
expressions of faith in each of the regions of the world and 
provision offreedom for creative response to unique char- 
acteristics. 

3. Connection of our global United Methodist mem- 
bership at essential points and through common global 
mission. 

4. Responsiveness to the radically changed and chang- 
ing world culture in which we are called to do ministry in 
Christ's name. 

Therefore, be it resolved, that the General Conference 
authorize the Council of Bishops, in cooperation with the 
General Council on Ministries, the General Council on 
Finance and Administration, the General Board of 
Global Ministries, the General Commission on Christian 
Unity and Interreligious Concerns, and the Commission 
on Central Conference Affairs (selecting at least three 
non-episcopal members) to continue to develop this pro- 
posal on the Global Nature of The United Methodist 
Church and to report to the General Conference 1996; and 

Be it further resolved, that the Council of Bishops 
submit the attached report as a progress report to the 
General Conference. 



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2. The Council of Bishops appointed a committee 
from among its members to assist it in this study. This 
committee cooperated with the agencies named in the 
resolution by working closely with the GCOM Connec- 
tional Studies Committee. It reported regularly to the 
Council of Bishops on the progress of its work. The 
Council of Bishops received from this committee a final 
draft of its report and took action on it. 

The following is now being submitted by the Coun- 
cil of Bishops to the 1996 General Conference as its 
progress report on the study of the global nature of the 
Church. 

Elements of the Global Vision 

The Council of Bishops offers the following ele- 
ments as helpful in clarifying our vision of a global 
United Methodist Church. 

3. We believe that the next step in the pilgrimage of 
"the people called Methodist" is to become a global Church. 

Why 'next step? One may view the past history of 
Methodism as consisting of two major phases. The first 
is the founding of Methodism and of the Methodist 
Church in England. The second is the establishment 
and growth of the Methodist Church in the United 
States of America. Would not the next phase be the 
globalizing of The United Methodist Church? The facts 
warrant this next step. Consider the following: 

i. The membership of The United Methodist Church 
is almost global and is growdng globally. This member- 
ship must be drawn into a global web of interactive 
relationship of common identity, life, and mission so that 
it can be truly said that "A member of a local United 
Methodist church is a member of the total United Meth- 
odist connection" (^ 210 of the 1992 Book of Discipline) . 

ii. The self-understanding of The United Methodist 
Church is that it is a church and is a part of the universal 
church (^ 4, Article IV of the Constitution of The United 
Methodist Church, 1992 Book of Discipline) . If so, then 
it bears the essential marks of the church, which are 
unity, holiness, catholicity, and apostolicity. These es- 
sential features of the Church must be expressed both 
locally and globally. 

iii. The fellowship of The United Methodist Church 
has always aimed at 'inclusiveness' {% 4, Article TV of the 
Constitution, 1992 Book of Discipline) . This inclusive- 
ness cannot be local only; it is also global. 

iv. United Methodists have always believed that 
they share a common heritage of faith with Christians 
of every age and nation, and at the same time they have 
developed distinctive ways of living and expressing the 
Christian faith (^ 65, 1992 Book of Discipline). This has 
shaped their identity and polity and is the basis of their 
ecumenical commitment. Are not all these best pre- 
served and strengthened by expressing them globally? 



By becoming a global church, The United Method- 
ist Church is only being consistent with its self-under- 
standing, its membership and fellowship, its identity and 
polity, and its commitment and witness to the Christian 
faith. If it does not take this step of becoming a global 
church, it will most likely face the danger of becoming 
fragmented into autonomous churches in various na- 
tions of the world, with the American segment becoming 
merely that — an American fragment of the once future 
global United Methodist Church! Must we not avoid this 
danger? 

4. We affirm that a global church is best able to do 
global mission in a globalizing world. 

We must gratefully acknowledge the fact that The 
United Methodist Church has already been doing global 
mission in all these many years. But it is also true that 
this global mission has been carried out with mainly 
American features: American perspective, American 
support, American personnel, American base and 
agency. Would it not be in keeping with the Gospel and 
the nature of the bearer of that Gospel (the church) if 
global mission were carried out by a global church? 
Consider the following: 

i. It would be considered odd at this time — to say 
the least — for a church with a national identity or label 
(for example: American United Methodist, Korean Pres- 
byterian, etc.) to be doing mission in another country 
for the purpose of planting itself there. This problem, 
however, would not arise for a global Church because it 
is already in almost every country, and it will not bear 
the label or identity of a nation! In a post-colonial world, 
mission cannot be another form of neo-colonialism. 

ii. The problems that mission must address today 
are global in character and scope: the future of Christian 
faith in a world that is increasingly secular and non- 
Christian (not to say anti-Christian); redeeming the en- 
vironment for human destruction, the issues around 
women, children, and the family; the need for a more 
global and inclusive community that is not racist, sexist, 
or ethnocenfrist; the global search for justice, peace, and 
sustainable development, etc.. ..Does not mission in re- 
sponse to global issues demand global visioning and 
global participation, and coordination and global pooling 
of resources? 

iii. The context of mission is a world that is increas- 
ingly being drawn into a global community by irresist- 
ible globalizing forces, such as: increased global fravel, 
global communication, the universalizing of human 
rights, the globalizing of the free market economy, the 
universal character and influence of science and tech- 
nology, the increasing awareness that the one earth in 
the one universe is our home, and preserving it and 
being at home in it are a common global responsibility, 
etc. Can mission be less than global in a global context? 
If the world becomes a global community, must the 
Church be left behind? 



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iv. Whatever else the historical reasons for John 
Wesley's remark, saying, "I look upon the world as my 
parish," nothing now prevents us from appropriating it 
as expressing the United Methodist perspective on mis- 
sion. The whole world is indeed the missionary parish 
of The United Methodist Church. To see it in this way 
requires that The United Methodist Church view the 
world globally. This is most likely to happen if "the 
people called United Methodists" became indeed a 
global Church! 

Taking all these factors into account. The United 
Methodist Church is only being responsive to the global 
issues and context of mission and faithful to its own 
missiological heritage if it began doing global mission 
from a global perspective as a global Church! If for some 
reason it fails to take this further step, it is likely that its 
missionary activity would be severely crippled and made 
irrelevant, globally speaking. 

5. We acknowledge that both the Church and mission 
are not only global but also local. 

The Church must be free to express its life and 
witness both globally and locally. So far we have said 
that both the nature of the Church and the character of 
mission drive toward globalization. There is, however, 
another side to both Church and mission which drives 
towards what might appear to be the opposite of globali- 
zation, namely, what might be called — ^for want of a 
better term — localization, which — as used here — in- 
cludes the local, the national, and the regional. This is 
actually the twin side of globalization, and both arise 
from the nature of the Church and the character of 
mission. One cannot have globalization without localiza- 
tion, and vice versa. 

The church is both global (universal) and local. The 
elements that constitute the church universally — the 
Word, the Sacraments, the worship and praise of God, 
faith in God through Jesus Christ, fellowship in the Holy 
Spirit — ^which are the same and true everywhere and 
through all time — find concrete expression in a local 
congregation composed of believers in a specific place 
and time. That concrete expression in its form and style 
and relevant sense is shaped by a unique culture. As the 
1992 General Conference resolution on the Global Na- 
ture of The United Methodist Church put it: "God seeks 
to manifest the gospel in each unique culture and na- 
tion." 

Mission thought global in thrust is, however, con- 
cretely local in expression because it seeks to respond 
out of the gospel to specific human needs in a given 
locality, nation, or region. In mission in toda3^s business, 
it is as well "to think globally and to act locally." 

These considerations lead to one significant conclu- 
sion: the Church in mission must be acknowledged as free 
to be responsive, flexible, and creative in expressing locally 
its life, faith, witness, and service, including the develop- 
ment of structures and agencies for local, national, and 
regional activity and governance, subject only to the 



essential limits provided by the faith and Constitution of 
The United Methodist Church. To deny this measure of 
autonomy to the Church would stifle its life and cripple 
its mission. To affirm it is to acknowledge the rightful 
claim to self-determination on the part of many seg- 
ments of our constituency (i.e. , the central conferences) 
for the purpose of releasing their energy and of express- 
ing thefr faith, life, and mission in ways that are signifi- 
cant in their respective cultures and social contexts. 

6. We envision a global Church vitally connected in a 
web of inter-dependent and interactive relationships in all 
its parts, vertically from the local to the global levels, and 
multi-laterally across horizontal lines around the globe. 

Connectionalism in the United Methodist tradition 
is multi-levelled, global in spread, and local in thrust. 

We are connected by sharing a common fradition of 
faith. 

We are connected by sharing together a constitu- 
tional polity, including a leadership of general superin- 
tendency. 

We are connected by sharing a common mission 
which we seek to carry out together both globally and 
locally. 

We are connected organizationally in and through 
conferences that reflect both the inclusive and repre- 
sentative character of our fellowship. 

We share a common ethos which characterizes our 
distinctive way of doing things. 

We are connected by a common journey of more 
fully expressing our connectionalism from the local to 
the global and from the global to the local. 

For us connectionalism is not merely a linking of 
one connectional charge conference to another horizon- 
tally across the globe. It is, rather, a vital web of interac- 
tive and intertwining relationships that enables us to 
express freely, justly, and in dignity at both global and 
local levels our essential identity, inclusive fellowship, 
common mission, distinctive ethos, and visible unity. 

This means, among other things, that we must not 
allow connectionalism to stop at the national or regional 
level. Genuine conectionalism cannot be less than 
global. Moreover, we must not allow our essential iden- 
tity, inclusive fellowship, common mission, distinctive 
ethos, and visible unity as United Methodists to be 
broken up into Humpty-Dumpty fragments which can- 
not be put together again on a global scale. We must 
keep and more fully express our global connection. But 
having said this, we must also be absolutely sure that 
our global connection does not stifle the life, nor cripple 
the mission, of the Church at the local level. On the 
confrary, we affirm that genuine connectionalism begins 
at, and expresses itself through, the local congregation, 
which in United Methodist polity is "a connectional 
society." 



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171 



7. We believe that a global Church should share its 
resources multi4aterally across the global connection to 
strengthen the life and mission of the Church at their 
cutting edge both locally and globally. 

The resources of the Church are not merely in its 
funds, but more importantly its understanding of, and 
commitment to, the Christian faith; its people in their 
capacities, experience, and skills; its many cultural 
forms (i.e., language, cultures, art forms), and, of 
course, its facilities and equipment. 

Moreover, the resources of a global Church rightly 
belong to, and must be used for the benefit of, the whole 
Church and the people whom it serves in mission. 

Furthermore, these resources may be more avail- 
able in some sectors of the Church than in others. Some 
sectors of the Church may also have needs that other 
sectors may more readily meet. This means that multi- 
lateral ways must be found to move resources from 
where they are readily available to where they are most 
needed in a manner that promotes mutual sharing, ef- 
fective pooling, hands-on delivery, wise use, transparent 
accountability, and eliminates forms of paternalism and 
dependencies. 

We have a long way to go in developing the under- 
standing, the relations, and the structures that will en- 
able us to share resources in the way indicated here. But 
becoming a global Church provides us the motive and 
the occasion. If we fail to seize the opportunity by glo- 
balizing, we will perpetuate the limited understanding 
and sharing of resources that have prevailed until now, 
together with their deplorable consequences. 

8. We are convinced that a strengthened ecumenical 
commitment will grow out of a global Church. 

Consider the following: 

i. The unity of our connection will become global 
and so more visible. It will transcend national, ethnic, 
and regional levels and boundaries. 

ii. Becoming a global Church will provide the oppor- 
tunity to develop a structure which will make it possible 
for other Methodist churches (such as the affiliated 
autonomous Methodist churches) to maintain their es- 
sential identity as Methodists and at the same time 
preserve the autonomy they now enjoy should they 
establish new linkages in the global connection. (As 
mentioned earlier, this issue remains to be explored.) 

iii. The tradition of faith represented in The United 
Methodist Church and other churches in the Methodist 
family will be seen as global in scope and not as a 
denominational fragment represented by autonomous 
or national churches. This perception should 
strengthen the bilateral conversations being conducted 
through the World Methodist Council. 

iv. By becoming a truly global Church, we would 
then join others in visioning a global unity for the uni- 



versal church, a unity transcending denominational, 
counciliar, or other forms of unity limited by national 
boundaries. 

9. We anticipate that globalizing The United Method- 
ist Church along the lines indicated above will stir up the 
winds of the Spirit to blow afresh, sweeping deeply across 
Methodist spirituality and renewing it for a global age. 

A new spirituality for a global Church in a globaliz- 
ing world is likely to entail the following considerations: 

i. Deepen and broaden the understanding of God 
the Spirit in such a way that no level or dimension of 
reality is outside His sphere. 

ii. Overcome the conflict between matter and spirit 
in the tradition of Christian spirituality towards a synthe- 
sis that is more fruitful for Christian life in today's world. 

iii. Facilitate a creative relationship between "the 
practice of the Presence of God" and the variety of 
cultures and their encounter, which today are the matrix 
for living the Christian faith. 

iv. Undergird and nourish a global Church with a 
vital spirituality that will sustain it as it becomes more 
globally inclusive in its membership and seeks to re- 
spond more missionally to the needs of a global age. 

Of course, the Spirit is free to blow where it wills, 
and the renewal of spirituality is not at the beck and call 
of human initiative. But globalizing The United Method- 
ist Church might just be the occasion and motive for "the 
people called Methodist" to gather together in a "global 
room" and wait in anticipation for a new Pentecost that 
will once again make peoples "hear God's deeds of 
power" in their "own native language" (Acts 2:7-11). 

10. Finally, becoming a global Church will pro- 
vide us with both the motive and the occasion to 
restructure our Church and make it ready to face 
the coming of a new millennium. 

i. Restructuring may mean that we place greater 
emphasis on covenant relationship rather than on legis- 
lative structure. 

ii. Restructuring for a global Church may mean that 
there are some aspects of our present structure that may 
have to be modified, or replaced, or abandoned. 

iii. It may also mean putting in place new ones that 
are essential for a truly global Church. 

iv. It could provide the opportunity to remove in- 
equities in current structures so that "the United Meth- 
odist family can live and serve together in common 
dignity and respect. 

A Proposed Form for a Global Church 

The following outline of a structure for a global 
United Methodist Church attempts to embody the prin- 
ciples stated above. The structure seeks to strike a 



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with: 



balance between global connectionality and identity on 
the one hand, and local autonomy and flexibility for 
missional and management purposes at national and 
regional levels on the other hand. Globalization and 
localization are twin sides of the same coin. But the 
structure outlined here is still tentative and imperfect. It 
needs to be worked on for further improvement. The 
issues are grouped under three headings: mission, 
structure, and leadership. We offer this outline of the 
form of a global Church as a proposal for further consid- 
eration. 

Global Conference 

11. It is proposed that there shall be a Global Confer- 
ence. 

i. This Global Conference shall personify, embody, 
and order the global identity and connectedness of 
global United Methodism. 

ii. It shall set forth the basic mission thrust of The 
United Methodist Church. 

iii. It shall have sole authority on matters dealing 
i: 

(a) Constitution 

(b) Doctrinal Standards and Our Theological Task 

(c) Mission statements and global missional initia- 
tives 

(d) Global social principles 

(e) General ministry of all Christians 

(f) Clergy orders 

(g) Episcopacy 

(h) General financial matters 

(i) Administrative order defined and/or delegated 

(j) Judicial Order Defined and/or Delegated 

(k) Formal ecumenical relationships with other 
global Christian denominations and interreligious 
groups 

0) Definition or requirements for church member- 
ship defined/delegated 

iv. The membership of the Global Conference shall 
be constituted in such a way that no one region would 
dominate or have majority over the others. For this 
reason, the composition of the Global Conference may 
be established as follows: 

(a) Memberships shall be composed of one lay and 
one clergy from each annual conference. 

(b) The size of the membership shall equal twice 
the size of the largest region of the annual conferences, 
plus two. 



(c) Extra delegates shall be apportioned to regions 
other than the largest region by proportion according to 
membership of the regions. 

V. Bishops shall be present and preside at the ses- 
sions of the Global Conference, as per current pattern 
(no vote/voice as granted). 

vi. The Global Conference shall meet every four or 
five or eight years, as the case may be. 

Global Mission Council 

12. It is proposed that there shall be a Global Mission 
Council. 

i. Such a council highlights the fact that a primary 
reason for The United Methodist Church becoming 
global is to carry on mission at both global and local 
levels. 

ii. The task of such a council is to be a global forum 
for focusing, visioning, initiating, and coordinating, the 
mission task of The United Methodist Church. 

iii. It carries out this task consultatively and persua- 
sively, not legislatively. And so it recommends mission 
initiatives to conferences and regions fi^om a global 
perspective and encourages the establishing of linkages 
and relationships that empower, drive, and express mis- 
sion. 

iv. It may be composed of the Council of Bishops and 
a corresponding number of laity /clergy, the total of 
which is equal to the number of active bishops. Of the 
non-episcopal composition of the council, two-thirds 
shall be lay and one-third shall be clergy. The lay/clergy 
membership is to be proportional to the membership of 
the regions. 

V. The Global Mission Council may meet every two 
years for one week, as the case may be. 

13. It is proposed that there shall be Regional Confer- 
ences. The Regions shall include North America, Africa, 
Asia/Philippines, Europe. The ways of relating to Latin 
America and the Caribbean will be explored. 

i. Regional Conferences shall have authority to de- 
fine their internal structure suitable to the life and mis- 
sion of the Church in their regions. 

ii. It shall decide whether to retain, replace, or mod- 
ify the present central/jurisdictional conferences. 

iii. It shall have authority over its own finances, 
including mission giving. 

iv. It shall implement the missional thrust of the 
Global Conference, as well as its own regional missional 
initiatives. 

V. It shall have delegates from other regions without 
vote. 



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173 



vi. It shall have authority over the following: 

(a) Articles of procedures On governance and man- 
agement) 

0)) Boards and agencies or other implementing 
mechanisms. 

(c) Central/jurisdictional conferences or their re- 
placement as defined by the regional conferences 

(d) Additional regional social principles 

(e) Regional Missional Initiatives 

(0 Elect and/or delegate the election of Bishops 

(g) Appropriate relationships with autonomous 
Methodist and ecumenical partner churches within the 
specific region 

(h) Regional judicial matters 

14. It is assumed that the charge conference and the 
annual conference shall remain constitutional struc- 
tures of the global Church, with whatever modifications 
determined by their respective regional conferences. 

Leadership 

15. Global leadership for the global Church shall be 
provided by the Council of Bishops. 

i. Bishops both individually and corporately (as col- 
leges and council) shall be held as visionary spiritual 
leaders of the global Church in its life and mission. 

ii. The Council of Bishops as set forth in ^ 50, Article 
III of the present Constitution will be retained. 

iii. Bishops are to be leaders of relationships which 
empower and inspire rather than as mere operators or 
managers of structures. 

Conclusion 

16. It is clear that much has yet to be done in 
perfecting this study on the global nature of The United 
Methodist Church. The unfinished work includes, 
among other things: 

i. Perfecting the proposed form 

ii. Consulting with partner churches such as autono- 
mous Methodist churches and ecumenical agencies on 
the implication of globalization. 

iii. Consulting with central conferences in the re- 
gions on the implications of the proposed form. 

iv. Assessing possible cost of the form and funding 
of the new form. 

V. Drafting the necessary legislation to implement 
the restructuring for a global Church. 



vi. Coordinating with GCOM and other partner 
agencies in completing the unfinished work. 

vii. Educating the constituency on globalizing The 
United Methodist Church. 

17. The quadrennium 1997-2000 may provide the 
needed time to do all of the above. The study must be 
completed and a report, including proposed implement- 
ing legislation, is to be presented for the consideration 
and action of the General Conference in the year 2000. 



On the Global Nature of the United 

Methodist Church 

Recommendation to the General 

Conference 

Petition Number: 21719-CO-NonDis-0$; COB 

Whereas, the Council of Bishops has deliberated 
upon the global expression of United Methodism; and 

Whereas, the Council of Bishops received a report 
from its Committee to Study the Global Nature of the 
Church which addresses the theological and ecclesi- 
ological foundations of our global connection; and 

Whereas, the Council of Bishops has considered a 
potential form for United Methodism's global mission; 
and 

Whereas, the Council of Bishops' Committee to 
Study the Global Nature of The United Methodist 
Church and The Connectional Issues Task Force of 
GCOM have shared in a productive exchange of infor- 
mation and thinking leading to an emerging consensus 
as to United Methodism's global mission; and 

Whereas, the 1996 General Conference of The 
United Methodist Church will be receiving the report 
from the Council of Bishops relative to the Global Nature 
of The United Methodist Church, along with other re- 
ports on structure and connectionalism that shall also 
be presented to The General Conference. 

Therefore, be it resolved, that we request that the 
report of The Council of Bishops on the Global Nature 
of the United Methodist Church shall be assigned to the 
Legislative Committee on General and Judicial Admini- 
stration for consideration and implementation; and 

Be it further resolved, that a Task Force or Commit- 
tee be authorized by The General Conference to develop 
further the proposals that address connectionalism and 
globality within the following considerations: 

a). The Task Force or Committee shall be com- 
posed of 30 persons: 

1. 6 persons to be nominated by a Nominating 
Committee composed of two representatives from 
GCOM and two representatives of The Council of Bish- 
ops and elected by The Council of Bishops. 



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2. Four persons at large, elected by The Committee 
to ensure inclusive membership on The Committee. 

3. Three persons elected by and representing 
GCOM. 

4. One person elected by and representing GCFA 

5. Sk bishops (three Central Conference and three 
U.S. bishops to represent the laos. 

6. Three persons from the Affiliated and Autono- 
mous churches be invited to participate in the work of 
the Task Force or Committee. 

b). The Committee shall engage in dialogue with 
The Council of Bishops and GCOM in a manner deter- 
mined by the respective bodies and in a fashion so as to 
facilitate reporting and response, as well as shared dis- 
cussion on at least three scheduled times during the 
quadrennium and vidth the understanding that the final 
report of The Committee will be reviewed by the respec- 



tive bodies. Consultation with the General Boards and 
Agencies shall also occupy the work of the Committee. 

c). Staffing for the Committee will be provided by 
GCOM with funding determined by GCFA; and also 

Be it further resolved, that the proposal of The 
Council of Bishops on the Global Nature of The Church, 
along with other studies, reports, and proposals on 
United Methodism's connectional life in a global context 
be given over to the aforementioned Task Force or 
Committee. 

Be it further resolved, that all consideration of 
United Methodist Connectional life in the global context 
be done in light of The United Methodist Church's 
commitment to strive for the unity of all Christians in 
each place where the church is present 



Bridge the Gap 



Unity, Liberty, and Charity: Building Bridges Under Icy Waters 

By Donald E. Messer and William }. Abraham 

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ways that United Methodists can bridge internal schisms, bringing influence back to the 
denomination. Designed as a study book for clergy and laity, Unity. Liberty, and Charity will help both 
professionals and nonprofessionals within United Methodism minister to one another and to other 
denominations, fostering an environment of ecumenical charity. In other words, building bridges of 
strength within the denomination will, in turn, fortify relationships with other denominations across the 
world and will help to position The UMC as a leader in a worldwide ecumenical movement. 

There is no time better than the present to begin healing ruptured relationships within The United 
Methodist Church and to establish strong friendships outside the denomination. 



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Conferences 



175 



Proposed Changes to The Book of Discipline 



^12. 

Petition Number: 20556-CO-12.1-C;WNC. 

Effective Bishops as Members of General Conference 

Amend ^12.1: 

1. The General Conference shall be composed of 
the efifective bishops of The United Methodist 
Church and not less than 600 nor more than 1,000 
additional delegates, one half of whom shall be minis - 
tefs clergy and one half lay members... 

^12. 

Petition Number: 21053-CO-12.3-C; GCCUIC. 

United Methodist Delegates to Other Conferences 

Amend ^ 12.3: 

3. In the case of The Methodist Church in Great 
Britain, mother church of Methodism, provision shall be 
made for the reciprocal election and seating of four 
dclcgatca, two clergy and two lay. The United Meth- 
odist Church to send two delegates annually to the 
British Methodist Conference, and The Methodist 
Church in Great Britain to send four delegates 
quadrennially to The United Methodist General 
Conference, the delegates of both conferences 
having vote and being evenly divided between 
clergy and laity. 

^13. 

Petition Number: 20407-CO-13-C;NMX. 

Meeting of General Conference 

Delete the first paragraph of ^ 13 and substitute the 
following text: 

Article II. — The first General Conference of the 
21st century shall meet in the month of April or 
May in the year 2001, and subsequent General 
Conferences shall meet every four years thereafter 
at such time and in such place as shall be deter- 
mined by the General Conference or by its duly 
autiiorized committees. 



114. 

Petition Number: 20961-CO-14-C;TEX. 

Ratio of Representatives in General, Central, 
Jurisdictional Conferences from Conferences 

Delete ^ 14(1) and (2) and replace with new text: 

(l)The number of clergy members and the 
number of lay members of local churches in the 
Annual Conference and the Missionary Confer- 
ence shall be added together as one body to form 
the sum total of the members of the Annual Con- 
ference and the Missionary Conference for the 
purpose of this article, and (2) one delegate shall 
be allotted for the first 10,000 members of the 
Annual Conference as computed in factor one, 
and one delegate for each additional 10,000 
members of the Annual Conference or major frac- 
tion thereof. The number of delegates shall be one 
half clergy and one half lay members to comply 
with the Constitution, Division Two, Section II, 
Article I, *il2; provided that each Annual Conference... 

115. 

Petition Number: 20063-CO-15-C;NWT. 

Legislative power of the General Conference 

Add a new sub-paragraph after ^ 15.14: 

To allow the Annual Conferences to utilize 
structures unique to regional aspects of their mis- 
sion, other mandated structures notwithstanding. 

[Judicial Council Decision 680 ruled that the 1992 
General Conference amendment on this subject was 
unconstitutional. To remedy such defect, amendments 
to Section n, §15, Article IV and to Section 707.1 are 
being proposed.] 

115. 

Petition Number: 20197-CO-15.10-C;TRY. 
Amendment to the Constitution 
Amend ^ 15.10: 
10. To fi x a unifor m the basis upon which bishops... 



176 



DCA Advance Edition 



^15. 

Petition Number: 20408-CO-15.15-C;NMX. 

The Power of General Conference 

Add a new sub-paragraph after "n 15.14 and renum- 
ber as appropriate: 

To specify an upper limit, in the aggregate, for 
the quadrennial budget of expenses for the vari- 
ous funds of the Chiu-ch to be presented to the 
next General Conference. 

121. 

Petition Number: 20409-CO-21-C;NMX. 

Responsibility of General Conference 

Add a new Rafter ^20: 

Article VII. — ^The General Conference shall not 
adopt for implementation or action any program, 
theme, study, focus or initiative imless at the same 
session it provides for the funds to pay for the 
same. 

125. 

Petition Number: 20410-CO-25-C;NMX. 

Power and Duties of Jurisdictional Conferences 

Delete ^ 25.1 and .3, and add the following new 
sub-paragraph after current .5: 

The chief administrative oflBcers of the several 
annual conferences shall serve together as the 
administrators of such rules addressing the life 
and work of the annual conferences within its 
boundaries as may be adopted by the jurisdiction. 

135. 

Petition Number: 20198-CO-35-C;TRY. 

Amendment to the Constitution 

Amend ^35: 

Article I. — The Annual Conference shall be com- 
posed of clergy miniatcriol members as defined.. .Each 
charge served by more than one clergy minister shall 
be entitied to as many lay members as there are clergy 
ministerial members... 

If the lay membership should number less than the 
clergy ministerial members of the Annual Conference, 
the Annual Conference shall, by its own formula, provide 
for the election of additional lay members to equalize lay 
and clergy ministerial m embership of the Annual Con- 
ference. 



Clergy members of an Annual Conference who 
eu-e in the retired relationship and who are not 
serving in any capacity as Retired Suppfy, chap- 
lains, or serving on any annual conference com- 
mittees, boards and/or agencies, and who are no 
longer attending annual conference and partici- 
pating in voting actions because of health or dis- 
tance, may, with their permission, be excluded 
from the ntunber of clergy members to be equal- 
ized with additional lay members. 

135. 

Petition Number: 21127-CO-35-C; GBHEM. 

Amend the Constitution of The United Methodist 
Church 

Amend the first sentence of ^ 35: 

...the president of the conference youth organiza- 
tion, the chair of the annual conference collie 
student organization, and two young persons... 

135. 

Petition Number: 21467-CO-35-C; WYO. 

Composition of the Annual Conference 

Add new text at the end of ^ 35: 

...membership of the Annual Conference. In deter- 
mining the niunber of additional lay members 
needed to equalize lay and ministerial member- 
ship of the Annual Conference, retired ministerial 
members of the Annual Conference ifdio have not 
attended sessions of the Annual Conference in 
four years shall not be coimted imless, by Septem- 
ber 1st, they indicate in writing to the Conference 
Secretary their intention to attend the next session 
of the Annual Conference. 

Retired bishops of The United Methodist 
Chtirch shall have the privilege of voice and vote 
in the Annual Conference in ^%1uch they reside. 
For the purpose of lay equalization, they will be 
included in the number of ministerial members if 
they indicate in writing to the Conference Secre- 
tary by September 1st their intention to attend the 
next session of the Annual Conference. 

136. 

Petition Number: 20185-CO-36-C;BMW. 

Voting Rights of Lay Members of Annual Conference 

Amend the first sentence of ^ 36: 

...with the exception that only those the lay mem- 
bers elected to serve in the membership of the 



Conferences 



177 



Board of Ordained Ministry may net vote on matters 
of ordination... 



^36. 

Petition Number: 20186-CO-36-C;WIS, KEN, AKM. 

Remove Prohibition of Laity Voting on Ordination, 
Character, and Conference Relations of Ministers 

Amend the first sentence of ^ 36: 

.. .under the Constitution , syith the exception that the 
lay mcmbcra may not vote on matters of ordination, 
character, and conference relations of mini s ters . 



^38. 

Petition Number: 20064-CO-38-C;DET, TRY. 

Ministerial Delegates to Conferences 

Amend ^ 38: 

Article IV. — ^The ministerial clergy delegates to the 
General Conference and to the Jurisdictional or Central 
Conference shall be elected by the ministerial clergy 
member s in full connection with of the Annual Confer- 
ence or Provisional Annual Conference; provided that 
such delegates shall have been traveling preachers 
clergy members in The United Methodist Church for 
at least four years next preceding their election and are 
in full connection with clergy members of the Annual 
Conference... 

^38. 

Petition Number: 20708-CO-38-C;EOH. 

Election and Eligibility of Clergy Delegates to General 
and Jurisdictional Conferences 

Amend % 38: 

Article. IV. — ^The ministerial clergy delegates to the 
General Conference and to the Jurisdictional or Central 
Conference shall be elected by the ministerial clergy 
members in full connection-witlt of the Annual Confer- 
ence or Provisional Annual Conference; provided that 
such delegates shall have been traveling preachers 
clergy members in The United Methodist Church for 
at least four years next preceding their election and are 
in full connection with clergy members of the Annual 
Conference... 



f505. 

Petition Number: 20200-CO-505-D;TRY. 

Number of Bishops 

Delete ^ 505 and replace with new text: 

Bishops in Jurisdictions and Central Confer- 
ences. — 1. In Jurisdictions and Central Confer- 
ences, the number of bishops shall be determined 
on the basis of missional needs: 

a) Jurisdictions. — ^Approved by the Jurisdic- 
tional Committee on Episcopacy, Jurisdictional 
Conference and the General Conference upon 
such recommendation as may originate from one 
or more of the following from within the jtuisdic- 
tion: 

• an annual conference 

• an episcopal area 

• the College of Bishops 

• the jurisdictional Committee on Episcopacy. 

b) Central Conferences. — ^Approved by the Gen- 
eral Conference on recommendation of the Com- 
mission on Central Conference Affairs. 

2. This legislation shall be effective immedi- 
ately upon its adoption by the 1996 General Con- 
ference. 

^505. 

Petition Number: 20557-CO-505-D;WNC. 

President of Council of Bishops 

Amend ^ 505: 

1. ... entitled toone additional bishop:; andprovided 
further that the jiuisdiction or central conference 
from which the president of the Coimcil of Bish- 
ops is elected for the quadrennitun shall be enti- 
tled to elect one additional bishop. At the 
completion of the quadrennium of service, the 
bishop who has served as council president, if not 
retiring, shall be assigned to residential and presi- 
dential supervision in a jurisdiction or central con- 
ference to be determined, with the consent of the 
bishop, by the Interjurisdictional Committee on 
Episcopacy (for a bishop elected by a jiuisdiction) 
or Committee on Central Conference AfEairs (for a 
bishop elected by a central conference), in accord- 
ance with ^612. 

3. This legislation shall take effect immediately 
upon adjournment of the 1002 General Conference rati- 
fication of a constitutional amendment creating 
the ofBce of president of the Council of Bishops. 



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^505. 

Petition Number: 21720-CO-505-D; The Council of 
Bishops. 

Bishops in Jurisdictions 

Amend ^ 505: 

1. Each jurisdiction having 500,000 church mem- 
bers or less shall be entitied to sbc bishops, and each 
jurisdiction having more than 350,000 500,000 church 
members shall be entitled to one additional bishop for 
each additional 500,000 325,000 church members or 
major fraction thereof; provided, however, that in those 
jurisdictions where this requirement would result in 
there being an average of more than 55,000 75,000 
square miles per episcopal area, such jurisdiction shall 
be entitied to six bishops for the first 400,000 church 
members or lc93, and for each additional 310,000 church 
members or two thirds thereof shall be entitied to one 
additional bishop for each additional 275,000 
church members or major fraction thereof. 

3. This legislation shall take effect upon adjourn- 
ment of the i093 1996 General Conference. 



1506. 

Petition Number: 20558-CO-506-D;WNC. 

Eliminate Nominations for Episcopal Elections 

Delete ^ 506.1 and amend .2 as follows: 

2. Process. — ef 1. Jurisdictional/Central Confer- 
ence delegates,... 

b)-2.TheJurisdicational and Central Conferences... 

^ 3. Consecration of bishops... 

1506. 

Petition Number: 20854-CO-506.2-D;RBM. 

Election of Bishops and Limited Tenure 

Add new text at the end of ^ 506.2: 

d) Beginning with the 2000 Jurisdictional 
Conference, those elected to the office of bishop 
shall have a term of 12 years. Bishops whose 
terms of office expire prior to the term of compul- 
sory retirement because of age and who are not 
reelected by the Jurisdictional Conference shall be 
returned to membership as traveling elders in the 
Annual Conference (or its successor) of which 
they ceased to be a member when elected bishop. 
Their term of office shall e3q)ire at the close of the 
Jtuisdictional Conference at which their succes- 



sor is elected, and they shall be entided to partici- 
pate as a bishop in the consecration of their succes- 
sors. The credentieds of office as bishop shall be 
submitted to the Secretary of the Jurisdictional 
Conference, who shall make thereon the notation 
that the bishop has honorably completed his/her 
term of service for which elected and has ceased to 
be a bishop of The United Methodist Church. 

e) A bishop elected prior to 2000 upon retire- 
ment shall be entitled to the following status and 
emoluments, prospectively and from the time of 
adoption of this provision: (1) has the right to use 
the title "bishop"; (2) has the right to attend ses- 
sions of the Cotmcil of Bishops; (3) has the right 
to have expenses paid for attendance at sessions 
of the Council of Bishops; (4) has the right to be 
seated among the bishops and retired bishops on 
the platform of the General Conference; and (5) 
has the right to have expenses paid for attendance 
at sessions of the General Conference. 



1507. 

Petition Number: 20535-CO-507.1-D; Cabinet of the 
West Virginia Annual Conference, WVA. 

Assignment of Bishops 

Amend ^507.1: 

[Second sentence] A bishop maybe recommended 
for assignment to the same residence for a third quad - 
rcnnium only if the Jurisdictional Committee on Episco - 
pacy, on a two - thirds vote and the Jurisdictional 
Conference by a t^'o-thirds vote as the Jtuisdictional 
Committee on Episcopacy determines such assign- 
ment to be in the best interest of the jurisdiction. TTiis 
legislation is to be effective at the close of the4998 1996 
General Conference. 

1601. 

Petition Number: 20201-CO-601-D;SGA, NTK. 

The Mission of the Church 

Insert the following preface before % 601: 

The mission of the church is to make disciples 
of Jesus Christ (see flOl). \Mtiun United 
Methodism, our distinctive connectional structure 
exists to enhance and to challenge the local 
church in its disciple-making ministry. Tlie con- 
nectional structure of the church is maintained 
through its chain of conferences. The conferences 
are channels used by God to give inspirational 
leadership and witness to a larger, global vision of 
our God-given mission. 



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179 



^602. 

Petition Number: 20199-CO-602-D;FLA. 

Composition of General Conference 

Amend ^ 602: 

l.c) Each General Conference shall set, within 
the range specified in the Constitution (^12.1), 
the maximum number of delegates which will 
comprise the succeeding General Conference. If 
such an action is not taken, the maximum number 
of delegates for the succeeding General Confer- 
ence shall be the maximtmi number as estab- 
lished in ^12.1. 

2. [Delete existing text.] The number of dele- 
gates to which an Annual Conference is entitled 
shall be computed on the basis of total member- 
ship of the Annual conference arrived at by adding 
the number of clergy members of the Annual Con- 
ference to the number of members of local 
churches in the Annual Conference. 

3. [Delete existing text] Sixty days following the 
end of the second calendar year of the quadren- 
nium, using the most current lay and clergy mem- 
bership figures then available, the secretary of the 
General Conference shall calculate the ntmiber of 
delegates to be elected by each Annual Confer- 
ence, based on the factors specified above. The 
method by which the ntmiber of delegates for each 
Annual Conference is determined shall conform to 
the following principles: 

a) The total number of delegates, including 
those chosen under lb, shall be as nearly equal to 
the number determined as provided in Ic as prac- 
ticable, without exceeding that number. 

b) Each Annual Conference shall be repre- 
sented by an equal number of lay and clergy dele- 
gates. 

c) Each Annual Conference shall be entitled to 
at least one clergy and one lay delegate. 

4. ...preceding the session of the General Confer- 
ence. Consideration shall be given to electing an 
inclusive delegation OT103, 113), Annual Con- 
ferences are not precluded from establishing 
nominating procedures to identify candidates for 
election to General and Jurisdictional Conference, 
provided that all persons eligible for election, in 
accordance with the Constitution, may be elected 
whether or not they have been formally nomi- 
nated. At least thirty days prior... 



^602. 

Petition Number: 20874-CO-602-D; Southeastern 
Jurisdictional Conference. 

Composition of General Conference 

Amend <][ 602: 

1 .c) Each General Conference shall set, within 
the range specified in the Constitution (^12.1), 
the maximum number of delegates which will 
comprise the succeeding General Conference. If 
such an action is not taken, the maximum number 
of delegates for the succeeding General Confer- 
ence shaU be the maximum ntunber as estab- 
lished in 112.1. 

2. The number of delegates to which an Annual 
Conference is entitled shall be computed on a two - factor 
the basist of the total membership of the Annual 
Conference arrived at by adding the number of 
clergy members of the Annual Conference «i4 to the 
number of members... 

The term "clergy members" as used in this para - 
graph shall refer to both active and retired members of 
the Annual Conference (^703.1). 

3. Sixty days foUowing the end of the second 
calendar year of the quadrennium, using the most 
current lay and clergy membership figures then 
available, tThe secretary of the General Conference 
shall calculate the number of delegates to be elected by 
each Annual Conference, based on the factors specified 
above;, as follows ; The method by which the number 
of delegates for each Annual Conference is deter- 
mined shall conform to the following principles: 

a) [Delete existing text.] The total mmaber of 
delegates, including those chosen under lb, shall 
be as nearly equal to the number determined as 
provided in Ic as practicable, without exceeding 
that number. 

b) [Delete existing text.] Each Annual Confer- 
ence shall be represented by an equal number of 
lay and clergy delegates. 

c) [Delete.] 

^ c) Each Annual Conference shall be entitled to at 
least one clergy and one lay delegate. 

e) [Delete.] 

4. Delegates to the General Conference.. .the ses- 
sion of the General Conference. Consideration shall 
be given to electing an inclusive delegation 
(11103, 113). Annual Conferences are not pre- 
cluded from establishing nominating procedures 
to identify candidates for election to General and 
Jurisdictional Conferences, provided that all per- 
sons eligible for election, in accordance with the 



180 



DCA Advance Edition 



Constitution, may be elected whether or not they 
have been formally nominated. At least thirty days... 



members of the Annual Conference or major frac- 
tion thereof. 



^602. 

Petition Number: 21609-CO-602-D; GCOM. 

Composition of The General Conference 
Amend ^ 602: 

1. a) An equal number of clergy and lay delegates 
elected by the Annual Conferences as provided in The 
Book of Discipline (^12). 

2. ex* This formula i s designated to comply complies 
with the Constitution,.. .the secretary of the General 
Conference shall be authorized to remedy the situation 
by adjus ting up or down the numbers of clergy mem- 
bers... 

6. The Secretary of the General Conference shall 
prepare and send credentials to each Annual Confer- 
ence secretary credentials to be signed and distributed 
to the delegates and reserves elected by the Annual 
Conference . The Conference secretary shall sign 
these credentials and distribute them to the dele- 
gates. 

^602. 

Petition Number: 20290-CO-602.2-D;WMI. 

Definition of membership in the Annual Conference 

Amend the second paragraph of ^602.2: 

The term "clergy members" as used in this para- 
graph shall refer to Elders, both active and retired, 
Deacons serving under full-time appointment, and 
full-time local pastors (who are members of the 
Annual Conference) (702.1). 

1602. 

Petition Number: 20962-CO-602.2-D;TEX. 

Composition of the General Conference 

Amend the first paragraph of ^ 602.2: 

2. The number of delegates to which an Annual 
Conference is entitled shall be computed on a two-factor 
basis: Factor One — the number of clergy members of 
the Annual Conference and the number of members of 
local churches in the Annual Conference shall be 
added together as one body to form the simi total 
of the members of the Annual Conference for the 
purpose of this paragraph. Factor Two — one dele- 
gate shall be allotted for the first 10,000 members 
of the Annual Conference as computed in factor 
one, and one delegate for each additional 10,000 



1602. 

Petition Number: 20963-CO-602.3-D;TEX. 

Delegates to General Conference by Annual 
Conferences 

Amend ^ 602.3, deleting a-d and replacing with new 
text: 

3. ...based on the factors specified abover; as follows 
provided that 

a) Hie number of lay delegates shall be equal 
to the number of clergy delegates authorized for 
each Annual Conference. 

b) Every Annual Conference shall be entitied 
to at least one clergy and one lay delegate. 

c) The secretary of the General Conference 
meets the constitutional provision of ^ 12 that 
prescribes the minimum and maximiun number 
of delegates to a General Conference as not less 
than 600 nor more than 1,000 delegates. 

d) Should the computations provided in the 
paragraph result in a figure below the prescribed 
minimum (600) or above the maximum (1,000) 
for delegates, the secretary of the General Confer- 
ence shall be authorized to remedy the situation 
as follows: The number 10,000 in factor two, pre- 
scribed in % 14 and \ 602.2, shall be adjusted up 
or down as necessary to entitie an Annual Confer- 
ence to elect delegates; any such adjustment shall 
insure the entitiement to delegates is based on the 
sum total of the Annual Conference's membership 
as prescribed in factor one of ^ 14. 

1604. 

Petition Number: 21610-CO-604.1-D; GCOM. 
Election of Secretary-Designate 
Renumber %, 604 as % 604.1. 

1605. 

Petition Number: 21611-CO-605-D; GCOM. 

Responsibilities of the Secretary-Designate 

Renumber % 605 as % 604.2 and .3 and amend: 

2. Assumption of OflBce. — The secretary-desig- 
nate shall assume the responsibilities of the office of 
secretary as soon after the adjournment of the General 
Conference as all work in connection with the session 
has been completed, including the corrections to the 
Daily Christian Advocate, which serves as the official 



Conferences 



181 



journal of the General Conference. The exact date of the 
transfer of responsibility to the secretary-designate shall 
be determined by the Commission on ijie General Con- 
ference, but shall not be later than December 31, follow- 
ing the adjournment of the General Conference. 

3. Assigned Duties. — ^The secretary shall, at the 
request of the General Commission on the General 
Conference, assist in initiating procedures to inform 
delegates from outside the United States concerning 
both the operation of the General Conference and mate- 
rials it will consider. 

After consultation with the Council of Bishops and 
the General Com.mission on Christian Unity and Inter- 
religious Concerns the secretary shall issue invitations 
to ecumenical representatives. 



1608. 

Petition Number: 20709-CO-608.2-D;NIL. 

General Conference Petitions 

Amend f 608.2: 

2. Each petition must address only one paragraph 
of the Discipline or, if the Discipline is not affected, one 
issue if the Discipline is not affected; if the Discipline 
is affected, each petition must address only one 
paragraph of the Discipline, except that, if two or 
more paragraphs in the Discipline are so closely 
related that a change in one affects the others, the 
petition may call for the amendment of those para- 
graphs also to make them consistent with one 
another. 

^608. 

Petition Number: 21612-CO-608.2-D; GCOM. 

Petitions to General Conference 

Amend ^ 608.2: 

2. Each petition must address only one paragraph 
of the Discipline or, if the Discipline is not affected, one 
issue, except as noted. A petition may address 
mtdtiple paragraphs if an identical change is to be 
made in several paragraphs. 

1608. 

Petition Number: 21558-CO-608.4-D; GCFA 

Petitions to General Conference 

Amend "fl 608.4: 

4. All petitions submitted to the General Confer- 
ence, except those submitted by individual members of 
The United Methodist Church and local church groups, 
which include proposals which would require 



funding from any general chtirch fund(s) (^910) 

call for the cstabliahmcnt of new programs or the expan - 
sion of existing programs will be invalid and will not 
be accepted for consideration unless accompanied 
by a statement setting forth the estimated cost of 
the proposal and a proposed source of funding 
supporting data which addresses the issue of anticipated 
financial requirements of the program . This require- 
ment would apply to all petitions which call for any 
of the following: 

a) the establishment by the General Confer- 
ence of a new coimcil, board, commission, com- 
mittee, task force, or other unit, whether 
temporary or continuing. 

b) the establishment of a new program or pro- 
grams or emphases. 

c) the expansion of existing programs. 

d) a requirement directing an existing agency 
to conduct studies, do research, provide resource 
materials or services, or take any other action 
which would require funding beyond that required 
for activities already being performed by the 
agency. 

The "proposed source of funding" may take 
the form of a proposal to add the cost to existing 
budget proposals or to substitute the proposed 
structure, program, or activity for specifically des- 
ignated structures, programs, or activities which 
were previously funded. 



1609. 

Petition Number: 20202-CO-609-D;MNN. 

Omission of Unconstitutional Clauses: Editing 

Insert a new paragraph after current ^ 609: 

The Committee on Correlation and Editorial 
Revision shall not reprint in succeeding editions 
of the Book of Discipline any clauses from a pre- 
ceding edition which have been declared uncon- 
stitutional by the Judicial Council. 

1611. 

Petition Number: 20203-CO-611.2-D;MNN. 

The Book of Resolution 

Add new text at the end of ^ 611.2a: 

Resolutions shall be considered official ex- 
pressions of The United Methodist Church for 
twelve years following their adoption, after which 
time tiiey shall be deemed to have expired unless 
re-adopted. Those which have expired shall not be 
printed in subsequent editions of the Book of Reso- 
lutions. 



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^611. 

Petition Number: 20559-CO-611.2-D;WNC. 

Review of Resolutions 

Amend ^61 1.2 J: 

2.b) The General Council on Miniatrica Council of 
Bishops and the program boards and agencies... 

^612. 

Petition Number: 21613-CO-612-D; GCOM. 

Interjurisdictional Committee on Episcopacy 
Amend ^ 612: 

2. No A bishop shall may be transferred across 
jurisdictional lines unless only when that bishop has 
consented... in which the bishop was elected and unless 
a concurrent transfer is effected into the jurisdiction 
from which the bishop is transferring or unless the 
Jurisdictional Conference which is receiving that bishop 
has voted to waive this right Such a transfer shall not 
be concluded an^l when the Committee on Episcopacy 
of each jurisdiction involved has approved the pteft 
transfer(s) by a majority vote of those present and 
voting, insofar as the transfer(s) it affects itsosro that 
jurisdictionT and the Jurisdictional Conferences, meet - 
ing concurrcntiy, have also approved . (See ^52 Article 
V). 

3. [Fourth sentence] Request for transfer from 
either a bishop or Jurisdictional Committee 8 on Episco- 
pacy must shall be received by the Interjurisdictional 
Committee on Episcopacy by April 1 of the year ftcift 
preceding the year of Jurisdictional Conferences.. ..the 
appropriate Jurisdictional Committee (s) on Episcopacy 
by July 1 of the year preceding January 1 of the year 
of Jurisdictional Conference (s) . Once the Jursidictional 
Jurisdictional Committee (s) on Episcopacy and the 
sending and receiving Juri s dictional Conference (s) 
have has taken action, Jurisdictional Conference secre- 
taries witt shall inform the Interjurisdictional Commit- 
tee... 

f624. 

Petition Number: 21614-CO-624-D; GCOM. 

The Jurisdictional Conference 

Amend ^ 624: 

It shall also have such other powers and duties as 
may be conferred by the General Conference, and in 
exercise thereof H t shall act in all respects in harmony 
with the policy of The United Methodist Church with 
respect to elimination of discrimination based upon 
race. 



^628. 

Petition Number: 20307-CO-628-D;WPA 

Authority of the Jurisdictional Conference. Amend 

Amend the last sentence of ^628: 

Special attention shall be given to the inclusion of 
clergywomen, youth, young adults, older adults, single 
adults, persons ¥fith a handicapping condition people 
with disabilities, persons... 

^629. 

Petition Number: 20560-CO-629-D;AVNC. 

Eliminate Jurisdictional Council on Ministries 

Amend the first sentence of ^629: 

In each jurisdiction of The United Methodist 
Church there may be a Jurisdictional Council on Minis - 
tries or Juri s dictional Administrative Council any ad- 
ministrative and programmatic structure organized 
as the jurisdiction shall determine and wth the authority 
to coordinate the programs of the general agencies 
wthin the jurisdiction . 



Petition Number: 20561-CO-630-D;WNC. 

Eliminate Jurisdictional Agencies 
Delete ^630. 

^638. 

Petition Number: 20562-CO-638.32-D;WNC. 
Status of Retired Bishops 
Delete ^638.32. 

1660. 

Petition Number: 21721-CO-660.1-D; The Council of 
Bishops. 

Organization of a Missionary Conference 

Amend the third sentence of ^ 660: 

Such conference and/or district superintendent(s) 
shall be an elder (s), and may nto be appointed for more 
than eight years shall be subject to the same limita- 
tions on years of service as district superinten- 
dents a 518). 



Conferences 



183 



^660. 

Petition Number: 20710-CO-660.7-D;SCA, GBHEM. 

Organization of a Missionary Conference 

Amend the first sentence of ^660.7: 

...all the rights and privileges of associate member- 
ship in the Missionary Conference except the right of 
guaranteed appointment, provided that... 

^664. 

Petition Number: 21341-CO-664.3-D; GBGM. 

Establishment and Administration of a Mission 

Amend the second paragraph of ^ 664.3: 

The bishop assigned to a Mission, in consultation 
with the deputy general secretary of the appropriate 
division of the General Board of Global Ministries,... 

^664. 

Petition Number: 21297-CO-664.6-D; GBGM. 

Assignment of Missionaries and Mission Traveling 
Preachers in the Conference 

Amend f 664.6: 

6. ...provided that transfer of National Division - re - 
lated missionaries related to the General Board of 
Global Ministries shall be completed only after con- 
sultation with the National Division of the General 
Board of Global Miniatriea . 

^664. 

Petition Number: 21298-CO-664.7-D; GBGM. 

Administration, Initiation, and Coordination 
of a Mission 

Delete ^ 664.7 and substitute new text 

Administration, initiation, and coordination of 
a Mission shall be in the General Board of Global 
Ministries. 

1700. 

Petition Number: 20518-CO-700-D$;BMW, VIR, NEB, 
WPA, NNY, NIN, UMCOM, SIN.PED, CIL 

Annual Conference Commission on Communications 

Add a new ^ after 'Q 727, renumbering as appropri- 
ate: 

1 . In each Annual Conference there shall be a 
Commission on Communications or equivalent 
structure which shaU include persons with sldUs 



in communications nominated for membership in 
a manner determined by the conference, in accord- 
ance with ^ 707.4. 

The commission shall be a service agency to 
meet the communication, publication, multime- 
dia, public and media relations, interpretation and 
promotional needs of the Annual Conference. It 
shall be responsible for providing resources and 
services to conference agencies, districts and local 
chiu-ches in the field of communication. The com- 
mission shall have a consultative relationship with 
all agencies and bodies within the conference 
structure. 

2. a) The commission shall include at least 
seven voting members. The following shall be ex- 
ofBcio members of the commission in addition to 
the number set by the Annual Conference: 

(1) the conference director of communication 
(if employed, without vote); (2) any member of the 
General Commission on Communication or the 
General Board of Publications who resides within 
the botmds of the conference, with vote, unless 
voting membership is in conflict with another pro- 
vision of the Book of Discipline, in which case 
his/her membership shall be without vote; (3) the 
presiding bishop, without vote; (4) a district su- 
perintendent, chosen by the cabinet, without vote; 
(5) the conference treasiu"er/director of adminis- 
trative services, without vote; and (6) the confer- 
ence council director, without vote. 

b) Two or more conferences may decide to 
have a single Commission on Commtmications, in 
which case each Annual Conference shall be rep- 
resented as stated in the preceding paragraph and 
each shall elect an equal number of voting mem- 
bers. 

3. The responsibihties of the Commission on 
Communications, unless the Annual Conference 
has designated another agency to carry any of 
these responsibilities, shall include: 

(a) To consult and cooperate with the confer- 
ence Council on Finance and Administration in 
providing district superintendents, pastors, and 
appropriate officers of the local churches and 
charge conferences with interpretive aids or mate- 
rials to assist in gaining understanding and sup- 
port of the conference budget and other approved 
causes. 

(b) To interpret and promote the programs 
and benevolences of the general Church, the Ju- 
risdictional or Central Conference, and the Annual 
Conference to the local churches in consultation 
with other general Church and conference agen- 
cies. 

(c) To develop, implement and maintain a 
comprehensive internal conununication network 



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among clergy and laity within the Annual Confer- 
ence, districts and local churches. 

(d) To guide radio, television and telecommu- 
nications ministries in the Annual Conference. 

(e) To assist other agencies of the Annual Con- 
ference, districts, and local congregations in the 
use of computers and computer networks for com- 
mtmication purposes. 

(f) To provide oversight for all periodicals 
(print and electronic) of the Annual Conference. 

(g) To facilitate training opportunities in com- 
munication for Annual Conference agencies, dis- 
tricts, and local chiu-ches. 

(h) To provide oversight of conference multi- 
media resource collections shared among Aimual 
Conference agencies, districts, and local 
chiu*ches. 

(i) To develop and coordinate, in consultation 
with the bishop, cabinet and other appropriate 
Annual Conference and general Church agencies, 
disaster and crisis communication plans for the 
Annual Conference. 

(j) To provide a liaison between the Annual 
Conference and The United Methodist Publishing 
House. 

(k) To raise public awareness within the geo- 
graphical region of the Annual Conference of the 
programs and poUcies of The United Methodist 
Chiu"ch; to be die primary soiu"ce of information 
services on behalf of the Annual Conference to the 
general pubUc; and to perform public and media 
relations functions for the conference. 

(I) To recommend the effective use of emerg- 
ing communication technologies and methods. 

(m) To perform such other communication 
services as the Annual Conference may assign. 

4. An executive ofBcer, to be known as the 
director of communications, shall be designated 
by one or more Annual Conferences to assist the 
commission in carrying out its responsibilities. 

^700. 

Petition Number: 21624-CO-700-D; GCOM. 

Conference Commission on Communication 

Add a new % after % 727: 

1 . In each annual conference there shall be a 
Commission on Communication or other struc- 
tiu"e to provide for the communication ministries 
and maintain the connectional relationships. It 



shall include persons with skills in commimica- 
tions nominated for membership in a manner de- 
termined by the conference, in accordance with % 
707.4. 

The commission shall be a service agency to 
meet the communication, publication, multime- 
dia, public and media relations, interpretation and 
promotional needs of the annual conference. It 
shall be responsible for providing resources and 
services to conference agencies, districts and local 
churches in the field of commtuiication. The Com- 
mission may be placed in the annual conference 
structure as determined by the annual conference 
and shall have a consultative relationship with all 
agencies and bodies within the conference struc- 
ture. 

2.a) The commission shall include a least 
seven voting members. The following shall be ex- 
ofi5cio members of the commission in addition to 
the number set by the annual conference; (1) the 
conference director of commtmications (witibout 
vote); (2) any member of the General Commission 
on Communication or the General Board of Pub- 
lication who resides within the boimds of the con- 
ference, with vote, tuiless voting membership is in 
conflict with another provision of the Book of Dis- 
cipline, in which case his/her membership shall 
be without vote; (3) the presiding bishop, without 
vote; (4) a district superintendent, chosen by the 
cabinet, without vote; (5) the conference treas- 
urer/director of administrative services, without 
vote; and (6) the conference council director, 
without vote. 

b) Two or more conferences may decide to 
have a single Commission on Communication, in 
which case each annual conference shall be rep- 
resented as stated in the preceding paragraph and 
each shall elect an equal number of voting mem- 
bers. 

3. The responsibilities of the Commission on 
Communication or other structure may include: 

a) To consult and cooperate with the confer- 
ence Council on Finance and Administration in 
providing district superintendents, pastors, and 
appropriate officers of the local chiu'ches and 
charge conferences with interpretive aids or mate- 
rials to assist in gaining understanding and sup- 
port of the conference budget and other approved 
causes. 

h) To interpret and promote the programs and 
benevolences of the general Chiu-ch, the Jurisdic- 
tional or Central Conference, and die annual con- 
ference to the local churches in consultation with 
other general church and conference agencies. 



Conferences 



185 



1701. 

Petition Number: 20473-CO-701-D;NTX. 

The Purpose of the Annual Conference 

Amend "J 701: 

^701.1 Purpose. The purpo s e mission of the An- 
nual Conference is to make disciples for Jesus Christ by 
equipping its local churches for ministry and by provid- 
ing a connection for ministry beyond the local church; 
all to the glory of God. The Annual Conference shall 
pay particular attention to equipping local congre- 
gations and developing connectional avenues for 
ministry in relation to inclusiveness throughout 
the chiu'ch, starting new faith communities and 
congregations, ministries with children, youth, 
younger adults, adults, older adults, singles, fami- 
lies, church school, Christian unity, interfaith re- 
lations, social justice issues, education, 
evangelism, campus ministry, spiritual formation, 
religion and race, community, national and global 
missions, stewardship, worship, commxmica- 
tions, and history and archives. 

2. The Annual Conference shall develop a 
structure, program and financial support for the 
faithful and effective carrying out of its mission in 
appropriate ways. Special attention shall be given 
to the inclusion of leaders who represent the di- 
verse constituency of the Annual Conference. 



1702. 

Petition Number: 20066-CO-702-D;IWA 

Part-Time and Student Local Pastors 
Amend ^ 702: 

1. ...and local pastors under full time appointment to 
a pastoral charge... 

d) Local pastors under full - time appointment.. 

e) [Delete] 

2. The following shall be seated in the Annual Con- 
ference and shall be given the privilege of the floor 
without vote: part - time and student local pastors; official 
representatives... 

1702. 

Petition Number: 20188-CO-702-D;EPA. 

Composition and character of the Annual Conference 

Amend ^ 7Q2d: 

d) Local and student part-time pastors under 
full ' timc appointment to a pastoral charge shall have the 
right to vote in the Annual Conference on all matters 



except constitutional amendments, election of clergy 
delegates... 

1702. 

Petition Number: 20204-CO-702-D;MSS. 

Voting Status of Retired Clergy at Annual Conference 

Retain % 702 without change and take no action to 
alter the membership or voting status of retired minis- 
ters in the Annual Conference. 

1702. 

Petition Number: 20291-CO-702-D;WML 

Definition of membership in the Annual Conference 

Amend % 702.1ft, c, and d for consistency of defini- 
tion in relation to petition 20290. 

1702. 

Petition Number: 20308-CO-702-D;WPA. 

Annual Conference membership of Local pastors 

Add new text at tiie end of 1 702: 

Eligibility and Rights of Local Members: Local 
members of an Annual Conference are local pas- 
tors (full-time, part-time, and student) of the 
Church. They shall be amenable to the Annual 
Conference in the performance of their ministry. 

1 . Local membership is renewed annually. 

2. Local members shall have the right to vote 
in the Annual Conference on all matters except the 
following: (a) constitutional amendments; (b) elec- 
tion of delegates to the General and Jurisdictional 
or Central Conferences; (c) all matters of ordina- 
tion, character and conference relations of min- 
sters. 

3. Local members may serve on any board, 
commission or committee of an Annual Confer- 
ence except the Board of Ordained Ministry and 
the Board of Trustees. They shall not be eligible 
for election as delegates to the General or Juris- 
dictional or Central Conferences. 

Requirements for Election as Local Members: Can- 
didates may be elected to local membership by 
vote of the clergy members in full connection, 
upon recommendation of the Board of Ordained 
Ministry, when they have met the following condi- 
tions: TTiey shall have (1) met the requirements of 
a local pastor OT 406-410); and (2) been ap- 
pointed by the bishop to serve a charge dtuing that 
year. 



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1702. 

Petition Number: 20543-CO-702-D;SNJ. 

Clergy Membership of Annual Conference 

Amend ^ 702. Irf: 

1. d) Local pastors under full-time appointment to a 
pastoral charge, part-time local and student pastors 
under appointment to a pastoral charge shall have 
the right to vote... 

1702. 

Petition Number: 20711-CO-702-D;EOH. 

Part-Time Local Pastors 

Amend ^ 702d: 

d) Local pastors under full-time or part time ap- 
pointment... 



4e) Local pastors under full time appointment... ex- 
cept constitutional amendments, election of lay dele- 
gates... 

tf) ...allow local and student local port time pas- 
tors.. .except constitutional amendments, election of 
clergy delegates... 

2. The following shall be seated.. . parttimc and stu- 
dent local pastors;... 

1702. 

Petition Number: 21247-CO-702-D; GBHEM. 

Composition and Character of the Annual Conference 

Delete % 702.1c, d, and e and amend .26: 

2. b) Probationary clergy members, associate and 
affiliate clergy members, and local pastors under 
appointment to a pastoral charge shall have the right 
to vote... 



1702. 

Petition Number: 20754-CO-702-D; Historical Society, 
the United Methodist Church, Durham, NC. 

Composition and Character of Annual Conference 

Add a new sub-paragraph at the end of ^ 702: 

Clergy members are encouraged to join the 
Historical Society of The United Methodist 
Church, whose programs and publications help 
keep the connectional principle alive (see ^112). 



1702. 

Petition Number: 20875-CO-702-D; NCJ Town & 
Country Assoc and Urban Network. 

Voting Rights for Clergy Members 

Amend ^ 702: 

1. .. .and local pastors under full - time appointment to 
a pastoral charge... 

c) Associate and affiliate clergy members shall have 
the right to vote in the Annual Conference on all matters 
except constitutional amendments, election of clergy 
lay delegates... 

d) Affiliate clergy members shall have the right 
to vote in the Annual Conference in which they are 
serving as missionaries on all matters except con- 
stitutional amendments, election of delegates to 
the General and Jurisdictional or Central Confer- 
ences, and matters of ordination, character, and 
conference relations of clergy. 



1702. 

Petition Number: 21615-CO-702-D; GCOM. 
Composition and Character 
Amend % 702: 

1. b) Probationary clergy members, associate and 
affiliate clergy members, and local pastors under 
fiiUtime appointment to a pastoral charge shall have 
the right to vote... 

c) [Delete.] 

d) [Delete.] 

2. The Lay membership of the Annual Confer- 
ence shall consist of a lay member elected by each 
charge, diaconal ministers, the conference presi- 
dent of United Methodist Women, the conference 
president of United Methodist Men, the confer- 
ence lay leader, district lay leaders, the president 
or equivalent officer of the conference young adult 
organization, the president of the conference 
youth organization, two young persons under 
twenty-five (25) years of age fi'om each district to 
be selected in such a manner as may be deter- 
mined by the Annual Conference. If the lay mem- 
bership should number less than the clergy 
members of the Annual Conference, the Annual 
Conference shall, by its own formula, provide for 
the election of additional lay members to equalize 
lay and clergy membership of the Annual Confer- 
ence. 

Each charge served by more than one clergy 
under appointment shall be entitied to as many lay 
members as there are clergy under appointment. 
The lay members shall have been members of The 



I 



Conferences 



187 



United Methodist Church for the two years preced- 
ing their election and shall have been active partici- 
pants in The United Methodist Church for at least 
four years preceding their election (^ 35, 252.2). 

a) In the Annual Conferences of the Central 
Conferences, the four year participation and the 
two year membership requirements may be 
waived for young persons under twenty-five (25) 
years of age. Such persons must be members of 
The United Methodist Church and active partici- 
pants at the time of election. 

h) By authorization of a Central Conference 
national Diaconal Ministers may be given the 
same privileges of a Diaconal Minister. 

3. [Delete.] 

6. When at any time a lay member is excused by the 
Annual Conference from further attendance during the 
session, the alternate lay member, sfiay if present, 
shall be seated inatcad .... 



^702. 

Petition Number: 20065-CO-702.1-D;DET, TRY. 
Voting Rights for Clergy Members 
Amend 1 702: 

1. ...and local pastors under full time appointment to 
a pastoral charge {^ 408. 1) . 

c) Associate and affiliate clergy members shall have 
the right to vote in the Annual Conference on all matters 
except constitutional amendments, election of clergy 
lay delegates... 

d) Affiliate clergy members shall have the right 
to vote in the Annual Conference on all matters 
except constitutional amendments, election of 
clergy delegates to the General and Jiuisdictional 
or Central Conferences, and matters of ordination, 
ch£iracter, and conference relations of clergy. 

4)^) Local pastors under full time appointment to a 
pastoral charge shall have the right to vote in the Annual 
Conference on all matters except constitutional amend - 
ments, election of lay delegates... 

t^f) Under special conditions, and for missional 
reasons, an Annual Conference may, by a two-thirds 
majority vote of its members present, allo w local and 
student local part time pastors under appointment to a 
pastoral charge the right to vote at Annual Conference 
on all matters excep t constitutional amendments, elec- 
tion of ekffy delegates... 

2. The following shall be seated in the Annual Con- 
ference and shall be given the privilege of the floor 
without vote: part time and student local pastors;... 



1702. 

Petition Number: 20189-CO-702.1-D;WIS. 

Enabling Laity as Voting Members 
of the Clergy Session 

Amend 702. Ic: 

a) Clergy members in full connection.. .shall have 
sole responsibility with elected lay members of the 
Conference Board of Ordained Ministry for all mat- 
ters of ordination,... 

1702. 

Petition Number: 21607-CO-702.1-D;TEN. 

Composition and Character 

Amend "J 702. le: 

L e) Under special conditions, and for missional 
reasons, an Annual Conference may, by a t¥ i 'o thirds 
majority vote of its member s present, allow IL ocal and 
student part - time pastors under part-time appointment 
to a pastoral charge shall have the right to vote at 
Annual Conference... 

1702. 

Petition Number: 21608-CO-702.2-D;TEN. 

Composition and Character 

Amend ^ 702.2: 

2. The following shall be seated in the Annual Con- 
ference and shall be given the privilege of the floor 
without vote: part - timc and student local pastors; official 
representatives... 

1703. 

Petition Number: 20362-CO-703-D;NYK 

Annual Conference Accessibility 

Insert a new sub-paragraph after % 703.3 and renum- 
ber accordingly: 

The Annual Conference sessions and all con- 
ference meetings shall be held in places which are 
accessible to persons with disabilities. The follow- 
ing are guidelines as to what makes a place acces- 
sible: 

Architectural Guidelines 

a. All meeting rooms to be used are accessible 
to those in wheelchairs. Examples of things which 
may make a room accessible: 

1) Everything is at grotmd level with no steps. 



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2) An elevator is available. 

3) A ramp of size and maximum angle of 1/12 
that wheelchairs can negotiate is available. 

4) Door openings are at least 36 inches wide. 

5. Pews or chairs are arranged to include 
space for wheelchairs. 

b. Accessible washrooms. 

c. Convenient parking for those with disabili- 
ties. 

d. Curb cuts if curbs must be negotiated. 

e. Adequate hand rails for safety. 

f. Adequate lighting. 

g. For overnight meetings, accessible lodging 
for participants. 

Communications Guidelines 

a. A loud speaker system. 

b. Sound equipment for the more profoundly 
hearing impaired. 

c. Signing for the deaf. 

d. Large print program materials or tape re- 
cordings available. 

e. Programs and directions making use of 
visuals, symbols, images, and soimds for persons 
who have difficxdty communicating via the printed 
or spoken word. 

Transportation Guidelines 

If at all possible that Annual Conference and 
other major meetings be held at sites accessible 
by public or arranged transportation. 

^703. 

Petition Number: 20205-CO-703.2-D;VIR 

Timing of Conferences 

Amend ^ 703.2: 

2. The bishops shall appoint the times for holding 
the Annual Conferences and may choose to hold 
such conferences less often than once per year. 



^703. 

Petition Number: 20563-CO-703.8-D;WNC. 

Conference Lay Leader 

Amend ^703.8: 

8. a) [Last sentence] The lay leader is a member of 
the Annual Conference, the conference Council on Min - 
istries, the conference Committee on Nominations, and 
the conference Committee on Episcopac y, and the ex - 
ecutive committee, if any, of the conference Council on 
Ministries, and may serve on the committee... 

b) The conference lay leader shall be the chairper- 
son of the conference Board of Laity, or its equivalent, 
if any, and shall relate to.... 

*n703. 

Petition Number: 21470-CO-703-D; 

Accessibility of Annual Conference Meetings 

Add a new sub-paragraph after ^ 703.3 and renum- 
ber accordingly: 

The Annual Conference sessions and all con- 
ference meetings shall be held in places which are 
accessible to persons with disabilities. The follow- 
ing are guidelines as to what makes a place acces- 
sible: 

Architectural Guidelines 

a. All meeting rooms to be used are accessible 
to those in wheelcheurs. 

Examples of things wUch may make a room 
accessible: 

1) Everything is at grotmd level with now 
steps. 

2) An elevator is available. 

3) A ramp of size and maximum angle of 1/12 
that wheelchairs can negotiate is available. 

4) Door openings are at least 36 inches wide. 

5) Pews or chairs are arranged to include 
space for wheelchairs. 

b. Accessible washrooms. 



c. Convenient parking for those with disabili- 



ties. 



d. Curb cuts if curbs must be negotiated. 

e. Adequate handrails for safety. 

f. Adequate lighting. 
Commtmication Guidelines 
a. A loudspeaker system. 



Conferences 



189 



b. Sound equipment for the more profoundly 
hearing impaired. 

c. Signing for the deaf. 

d. Large print progriim materials or tape re- 
cordings available. 

e. Programs and directions making use of 
visuals, symbols, images and sounds for persons 
who have difficulty conununicating via the printed 
or spoken word. 



^704. 

Petition Number: 21248-CO-704.4-D; GBHEM. 

Powers and Duties of the Annual Conference 

Amend the last sentence of ^ 704.4: 

The Annual Conference shall have power to locate 
a clergy member for unacccptability or inefficiency fiail- 
ure to perform effectively and competently the du- 
ties of itinerant ministry. 

^704. 

Petition Number: 21249-CO-704.7-D; GBHEM. 

Powers and Duties of the Annual Conference 

Amend "B 704.7: 

7. Whenever clergy members, whether on b4al pro- 
bation or in full connection,... 

^704. 

Petition Number: 20427-CO-704.13-D;NMX. 

Power and Authority of Annual Conference 

Add a new sub-paragraph after ^ 704.12: 

Annual Conferences shall have the power and 
authority to organize themselves for mission by 
using such structures as they may determine to be 
appropriate, subject to the requirements that, in 
doing so, the Annual Conferences shall provide for 
functions and structures that are specifically man- 
dated by the Discipline and shall provide for inclu- 
siveness in the membership of structures chosen, 
as required by ^707.4. 



^705. 

Petition Number: 21616-CO-705.3-D; GCOM. 

Business of the Conference 

Amend ^ 705.3: 

3. Members for all standing committees, boards, 
and commissions of the Annual Conference shall be 
selected in such manner as the Annual Conference may 
determine or as t The Book of Discipline may specifically 
require or as the Annual Conference may deter- 
mine. 

^705. 

Petition Number: 20190-CO-705.6-D;WIS. 

Giving Lay Members of the Board of Ordained 
Ministry Vote at the Clergy session 

Amend ^ 705.6: 

6. ...All clergy members (^ 70L1) of the Annual 
Conference and the elected lay members or observers 
of the Board of Ordained Ministry may attend and shall 
have voice in the clergy session. Only the ordained 
clergy in full connection and the lay members of the 
Board of Ordained Ministry may vote (^ 70L la) . 

^706. 

Petition Number: 20564-CO-706.2-D;WNC. 

Eliminate General Council on Ministries 

Amend ^ 706.2: 

2. Each Annual Conference shall send to the Gen- 
eral Council on Finance and Administration two printed 
copies of its annual journal and one printed copy to the 
General Council on Ministries Council of Bishops. 

1706. 

Petition Number: 21365-CO-706.2-D; UMCOM. 

Records and Archives 

Amend ^ 706.2: 

2. ...to the General Council on Ministries and to 
United Methodist Communications. 



1706. 

Petition Number: 20363-CO-706.9-D;RKM. 

Records and Archives 

Amend ^706.9<:: 

9.c) access to unpublished records by persons other 
than the bishop, district superintendent, conference sec- 



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DCA Advance Edition 



retary, treasurer, assistant to the bishop, conference 
cheincellor, or other administrative officer... 



^707. 

Petition Number: 20191-CO-707-D;BMW. 

Conference Agencies 

Amend ^707: 

The Annual Conference shall provide for the con- 
ncctional relationship between the general boards and 
commissions and the conference, district, and local 
church be the basic connectional body for evangeli- 
zation, ministry and mission in covenant with local 
congregations and the General and Jurisdictional 
Conferences; unite the local congregations within 
its bounds into a basic, ongoing, inclusive body of 
the chiu-ch universal imder the lordship of Jesus 
Christ; and resotu'ce and equip local congrega- 
tions, conference ministries and other expres- 
sions of church as commtmities of disciples of 
Jesus Christ. 



^707. 

Petition Number: 20368-CO-707-D;NYK 

Accessibility in Annual Conference Boards 
and Agencies 

Insert a new sub-paragraph after current ^707.3 and 
renumber accordingly: 

All meetings scheduled by the Annual Confer- 
ence and its districts, bo£irds, or committees shall 
be held in places which are accessible to persons 
with disabilities. The following are guidelines as to 
what makes a place accessible: 

Architectural Guidelines 

a. All meeting rooms to be used are accessible 
to those in wheelchairs. Examples of things \diich 
may make a room accessible: 

1) Evetything is at ground level with no steps. 

2) An elevator is available. 

3) A ramp of size and maximum angle of 1/12 
that wheelchairs can negotiate is available. 

4) Door openings are at least 36 inches wide. 

5. Pews or chairs are arranged to include 
space for wheelchairs. 

b. Accessible washrooms. 

c. Convenient parking for those with disabili- 



ties. 



d. Curb cuts if curbs must be negotiated. 



e. Adequate hand rails for safety. 

f. Adequate lighting. 

g. For overnight meetings, accessible lodging 
for participants. 

Communications Guidelines 

a. A loud speaker system. 

b. Sotmd equipment for the more profoundly 
hearing impaired. 

c. Signing for the deaf. 

d. Large print program materials or tape re- 
cordings available. 

e. Programs and directions making use of 
visuals, symbols, images, and sounds for persons 
who have difficulty communicating via the printed 
or spoken word. 

1707. 

Petition Number: 2042&-CO-707-D;NMX. 
Connectional Relationship 

Amend ^ 707: 

^707. ?%e-Annual Conferences shall provide for the 
connectional relationship between the general boards 
and commissions and the conference, district, and local 
church. The connectional relationship may be pro- 
vided for in ways and with structures within the 
Annual Conference that the Annual Conference 
determines to be appropriate for its mission, ex- 
cept that functions and structures that are man- 
dated by the Discipline shall be provided. In 
providing for the structure or structures, the An- 
nual Conference shall be inclusive (^ 707.4) and 
shall consider representation from churches of 
various sizes. 

1707. 

Petition Number: 20489-CO-707-D;NNJ. 

The Structure of Annual Conference 

Add new text at the end of ^ 707.1: 

Notwithstanding anything else herein pro- 
vided, any Annual Conference may decide to 
structure itself as it sees fit to accomplish the 
several ministries for which it is responsible, pro- 
vided that: 

a) any Conference which makes this election 
shall see to it that all of the work of the commis- 
sions, boards and agencies that would otherwise 
have been required is assigned to an appropriate 



Conferences 



191 



substitute agency, which may also have otiier work 
assigned to it by the Annual Conference; 

b) a Conference making this election shall no- 
tify and maintain connection with appropriate gen- 
eral agencies through its successor agencies and 
bodies; 

c) a list of Annual Conference agencies and a 
description of their portfolios be readily available 
at the Conference office, so that callers can be 
advised who to contact in their area of interest or 
concern; and 

d) each of such successor agencies shall re- 
ceive adequate budget and have adequate mem- 
bership to carry out the work assigned to it on a 
schedule appropriate for the Conference. 

^707. 

Petition Number: 20565-CO-707-D;WNC. 

Connectional Relationships 

Amend ^ 707: 

The Annual Conference aheli may provide for the 
connectional relationship... 

1. An Annual Conference shaH may provide for the 
functions.. .In doing this the Annual Conference may 
utili2e structures unique to regional aspects of its mis- 
sion , other mandated atructurcs not vyithatanding . 

^707. 

Petition Number: 21617-CO-707-D; GCOM. 

Conference Agencies 

Amend ^ 707: 

The Annual Conference is responsible for struc- 
turing its ministries in order to accomplish its 
ptupose (^ 701). In so doing it shall provide for 
the connectional relationship of the local church, 
district and conference with the general agencies 
shall provide for the connectional relationship between 
the general board s and commiasions and the confer - 
ence, district, and local church . It will monitor to 
ensure racial, gender, age inclusiveness and for 
persons with disabilities in the Annual Confer- 
ence. 

l.a) An Annual Conference shall provide for the 
functions and General Conference connections of with 
all boards and generzd agencies provided by the Disci- 
pline. In doing this the Annual Conference may organ- 
ize units so long as the functions of ministry are 
fuHBlled and the connectional relationships are 
maintained. Utilize structurca unique to regional aa 
pcets of its mission, other mandated atructurca not with - 
atanding. ^^ 



b) An Annual Conference may utilize the inter- 
active model of organization including the ele- 
ments of: (1) the Annual Conference; (2) 
Outreach, Nurture, Witness Ministries; (3) Lead- 
ership Ministries; (4) Administrative and Fiscal 
Ministries and; (5) the Council to fulfill the func- 
tions as specified in ^ 701. 



TI707. 

Petition Number: 20052-CO-707.1-D;NWT. 



Conference Agencies 

Add ^707.1: 

1 . An Annual Conference shall provide for the 
functions and General Conference connections of 
all boards and agencies provided by the Disci- 
pline. In doing this, the Annual Conference may 
utilize structures unique to regional aspects of its 
mission, other mandated structures notwithstand- 
ing. 

[Judicial Council Decision 680 ruled that the 1992 
General Conference amendment on this subject was 
unconstitutional. To remedy such defect, amendments 
to Section II, §15, Article IV and to Section 707.1 are 
being proposed.] 



^707. 

Petition Number: 20187-CO-707.1-D;BMW. 

Mandated Structures Provided by Annual Conference 

Amend ^ 707.1: 

...In doing this the Annual Conference may utilize 
structures unique to regional aspects of its missionT. 
other mMandated structures not withstanding, which 
Annual Conference shall provide for are: 

-Board of Laity 

-Board of Ordained Ministries 

-Board of Diaconal Ministries 

-Committee on Episcopacy 

-Episcopacy Residence Committee 

-Board of Pensions 

-United Metiiodist Women 

-United Methodist Men 

-Council on Youth Ministries 

An Annual Conference shall have the following 
structures or an equivalent structure that fulfills 
their function: 



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-An agency or agencies on finance and admini- 
stration 

-Commission on Equitable Compensation 

-Conference Comicil on Ministries 

-Committee on Ethnic Local Church Concerns 

-Board of Church and Society 

-Board of Discipleship 

-Board of Global Ministries 

-Board of Higher Education and Campus Min- 
istry 

-Commission on Archives and History 

-Commission or Committee on Christian 
Unity and Interrehgious Concerns 

-Commission on Religion and Race 

-Commission on the Status and Role of 
Women 

-Joint Committee on Disability 

-Committee on Native American Ministry 

An Annual Conference may have the following 
structures or an equivalent structure to fulfill their 
function: 

-Commission on the Small Membership 
Chxwch 

-Committee on Ministry to and with Persons 
with Handicapping Conditions. 

^707. 

Petition Number: 20429-CO-707.1-D;NMX. 

Conference Agencies 

Delete ^ 707.1 and replace with new text 

1. Annual Conferences shall provide for per- 
formance of the functions and for the General 
Conference connections of all boards and agencies 
provided by the Discipline through the use of ways, 
structures, and organizations that each Annual 
Conference determines to be appropriate, except 
in instances in which the Discipline makes a certain 
structure mandatory. The structures or organiza- 
tions provided are hereinafter sometimes called 
the "structure," for convenience, without intend- 
ing to limit the niunber of structures or orgeiniza- 
tions provided by the Annual Conferences. Unless 
a structure is mandated by provisions of the Disci- 
pline, no specific form of structure is required. 



1707. 

Petition Number: 20474-CO-707.1-D;NTX. 

Responsibilities of the Annual Conference 
Delete ^707.1 and substitute the following text 

1 . There shall be a Conference Administrative 
Council in each Annual Conference. Its purpose 
shall be to help carry out the annual conference's 
mission to equip local churches to make disciples 
of Jesus Christ and to help connect together local 
churches for broader mission and ministry. Its 
primary responsibility will be to ahgn the work of 
all conference agencies in order to enstu'e that the 
conference's mission is faithfulty and effectively 
carried out. The Conference Administrative Coim- 
cil may organize itself in any way the Annual Con- 
ference determines, including teams, committees 
and task forces. 

2. Membership — The Annual Conference will deter- 
mine the size of the Conference Administrative Council. 
The Council will elect its own officers. The membership 
will consist of the following: 

a. the resident Bishop 

b. the district superintendents 

c. executive conference staff 

d. the annual conference Lay Leader 

e. the chair of the episcopal committee 

f. the chair of the Cotmcil on Finance and 
Administration 

g. the chair of the Board of Ordained Ministry 

h. the chair of the Board of Diaconal Ministry 

i. the president of the conference United Meth- 
odist Women 

j. the president of the conference United Meth- 
odist Men 

k. the president of the conference youth or- 
ganization 

1. other members as the Annual Conference 
shall determine 



11707. 

Petition Number: 20755-CO-707.1-D; 
HistoricalSociety, the United Methodist Church. 

Conference Agencies 

Add a new sentence at the end of ^ 707.1: 

The Annual Conference shall encourage mem- 
bers to join the Historical Society of The United 



Conferences 



193 



Methodist Church, whose programs and publica- 
tion help keep the connectional principle alive (see 
*]I112). 

^707. 

Petition Number: 20309-CO-707.4-D;WPA 

Membership on Boards and Agencies 

Amend the first sentence of ^707.4: 

4. ... pcraons with handicapping conditions people 
with disabilities, and racial and ethnic... 



^707. 

Petition Number: 21722-CO-707.4-D; Commission on 
Pan-Methodist Cooperation. 

Annual Conference Agencies 

Add a new paragraph at the end of ^ 707.4: 

Each annual conference shall have a Commit- 
tee of Pan-Methodism to implement cooperative 
ventures on the local level. Members of the na- 
tional body shall be ex-ofi5cio members with vote. 

^726. 

Petition Number: 20067-CO-726-D;MOE, MOW. 

Flexibility in Annual Conference structure 

Amend ^ 726: 

In each Annual Conference of the United Methodist 
Church there shall be a conference Council on Minis- 
tries or alternate structure hereafter referred to as 
Conference Council; provided that.... 

1. Purpose. — ^The purpose of the Aftmial Conference 
Council on Mini9tric3 , as part of the total mission of the 
church, is to facilitate the Church's program life in the 
Annual Conference. The Conference council's task.... 

2. Membership.— The membership of the Annual 
Conference Council on Ministries shall may consist of 
the presiding bishop;. ..two representatives of the confer- 
ence United Methodist Women, one of whom ahrfmay 
be the president; two representatives of the conference 
United Methodist Men, one of whom shali may be the 
president;.... 

The person or persons serving as members of the 
General Council on Ministries shaH may be member (s) 
of the Annual Conference Council on Ministries as full 
voting member (s). 

The following shaB may be members of the council 
without vote.... 

3. Officers. — ^The officers of the council shall may be 
a chairperson.... 



4. [2nd paragraph] The executive committee may 
also serve as the Personnel Committee of the eConfer- 
ence Council on Ministries . 

5. Committees, Task Forces, and Consult- 
ations. — ^The council shall appoint or elect a Committee 
on Ethnic Local Church Concerns or alternate struc- 
ture. In addition, the council may appoint or elect a 
Committee on Communication,. ..It may appoint or elect 
such other committees,... 

a) Committee on Ethnic Local Church Con- 
cerns. — ^There shall be organized in each Annual Con- 
ference a Committee on Ethnic Local Church Concerns 
or alternate structure. The responsibilities of 
Committee on Ethnic Local Chiu-ch Concerns may 
be assigned to an existing or newly created multi- 
functional agency of the Council that cares for the 
functions of and the connectional relationships of 
Ethnic Local Church Concerns, conference, dis- 
tricts, and local churches. It shall relate to. ..The 
committee shall have representation on the Conference 
Council on Ministries . It shall develop criteria for use in 
evaluating racial/ethnic projects and programs within 
the conference and in reporting on its work to the 
Conference Council on Ministries .. .It shall may also 
include a cabinet representative. The committee's find- 
ings will be referred to the appropriate conference 
Commission on Religion and Race group responsible 
for racial and ethnic inclusiveness. It will cooperate 
with the Commission on Religion and Race appropriate 
group in its efforts... 

b) Committee on Communication. — In each Annual 
Conference Council on Ministries , chosen by it... 

e) [Second sentence] The committee shall may 
consist of.. .Members of the General Board of Publica- 
tion shall may be members ex officio. The committee 
chairperson shall be a member of the eConference 
Council on Ministries ... 

7.b){l) To serve as the executive officer of the 
Annual Conference Council on Ministries . 

(4) To serve as a resource person for district pro- 
grams and the Annual Conference Council on Ministries 
program agencies... 

(5) To supervise the Annual Conference Council ©ft 
Ministries staff members. 

(6) To serve on other Annual Conference agencies 
as determined by the Annual Conference, and/or by the 
eConference Council on Ministries . 

8. Staff. — ^All Annual Conference eCouncil staff may 
be employed by, directed by, and amenable to the Aft- 
fwal Conference Council on Ministries . 

9.a) Between sessions of the Annual Conference, 
all Annual Conference program agencies shall cooper- 
ate with and be amenable to the Conference Council oft 
Ministries of the Annual Conference in matters... 



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10. Responsibilities. — ^The responsibilities of the Afl- 
ftttrf Conference Council on Mini3ta"ic3 are:... 



^726. 

Petition Number: 20367-CO-726-D;NYK 

Annual Conference Council on Ministries 

Amend ^ 726: 

In each Annual Conference of TTie United Method- 
ist Church there shall be a conference Council on Min- 
istries or equivalent strucUire; provided that such 
council structure or any component.. 

^726. 

Petition Number: 20430-CO-726-D;NMX. 

Conference Council on Ministries 

Amend ^ 726: 

fe-eEach Annual Conference of the United Method 
ist Church there shall fee-a provide for the fulfillment 
of the purpose, duties and responsibihties of the 
conference Council on Ministries assigned by 
^726.1- .10, and elsewhere, by structuring itself 
as it determines appropriate; provided that such 
council structure or organization or any component 
thereof may be organized on an area basis. References 
to the "Conference Coimcil on Ministries" or to 
"the coimcil" in this ^726 and its various sub- 
paragraphs, and elsewiiere in the Discipline in ap- 



propriate context, shall be construed and inter- 
preted to refer to the structure provided pursuant 
to this paragraph, whatever it may be named or 
called. 



^726. 

Petition Number: 20475-CO-726-D;NTX. 

Annual Conference Council on Ministries 
Delete ^726. 

^726. 

Petition Number: 20490-CO-726-D;NNJ. 

Conference Council on Ministries 

Amend ^ 726: 

In each Annual Conference of The United Method- 
ist Church there shall be a conference Council on Min- 
istries (or the responsibihties outlined below may 
be assigned to such other organization as the An- 
nual Conference provides pursuant to ^ 707.1); 
provided that.. 

%726. 

Petition Number: 20544-CO-726-D;SNJ. 

Conference Council on Ministries 
Delete ^ 726. 



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195 



1726. 

Petition Number: 20545-CO-726-D;SNJ. 
Program Coordinator 
Delete ^ 726 and replace with new text: 

a) Program Coordinator. — ^The Annual Confer- 
ence shall elect, upon nomination by the Annual 
Conference Nominating Committee, in consult- 
ation with the Cabinet, a program coordinator. The 
coordinator shall be present when the Cabinet 
considers matters relating to coordination, imple- 
mentation, and administration of the conference 
program, and other matters as the Cabinet and 
coordinator may determine. The coordinator shall 
not be present during the Cabinet discussions on 
matters related to the making of appointments and 
clergy conference relations. A limit to the term of 
service for the coordinator may be set by the An- 
nual Conference. 

b) Responsibilities. — ^The responsibilities of the 
program coordinator shall be but are not limited 
to the following: 

(1) To be a communication link between the 
Annual Conference program agencies and the Ju- 
risdictional (where they exist) and General Confer- 
ence program agencies. 

(2) To facilitate communication among the An- 
nual Conference program agencies and the local 
churches. 

(3) To serve as a resoiu"ce person for district 
programs and the Annual Conference program 
agencies in their planning, implementation, and 
evaluation process. 

(4) To reconunend program staffing needs of 
the Annual Conference in consultation with the 
Cabinet and the conference Council on Finance 
and Administration. Insofar as possible, employ- 
ees of the conference shall include men, women, 
racial and ethnic persons, lay and clergy, at every 
level. Ordained ministers on the staff are subject 
to being appointed by the presiding bishop. 

(5) To supervise the Annual Conference pro- 
gram staff. 

(6) To serve on other Annual Conference agen- 
cies as determined by the Annual Conference. 

(7) To serve as a consultant to the conference 
Conunittee on Nominations. 



1726. 

Petition Number: 20566-CO-726-D;WNC. 

Eliminate Conference Council on Ministries 

Delete ^ 726 and substitute the following text: 

The Annual Conference shall develop, admin- 
ister, and evaluate the missional life and program 
of the Church in the Annual Conference and shall 
provide encoiu-agement, coordination, and sup- 
port for the conference agencies, districts, and 
local churches in their ministries of nurture, out- 
reach, and witness in accordance with the mission 
of The United Methodist Church. 

1726. 

Petition Number: 21300-CO-726-D; GBGM. 

Committee on Hispanic Ministry 

Add a new sub-paragraph after % 726.5a: 

Committee on Hispanic Ministry. — Each Annual 
Conference shall create a Conference Committee 
on Hispanic Ministry or its equivalent which will 
relate to all conference agencies for the implemen- 
tation of the Plan for Hispanic Ministry as it has 
been adjusted for the conference. It is recom- 
mended that this committee be composed of per- 
sons representing local Hispanic ministries as 
well as representatives from those districts where 
there is a significant Hispanic population. A Dis- 
trict Superintendent shall be a member of die 
committee in order to provide linkage with the 
Cabinet The committee membership shall reflect 
the conference diversity. The responsibiUties of 
the committee shall be to work with the Confer- 
ence Council on Ministries or its equivalent in the 
coordination needed for the implementation of the 
Plan for Hispanic Ministry. Its function shall be: 

1) To assist the Council on Ministries or 
equivalent unit to develop a conference plan for 
Hispanic ministry. 

2) To assist the Council on Ministries or 
equivalent unit in the implementation of the Plan 
focusing on the components recommended by the 
National Hispanic Plan: Planning, Training, Re- 
soiu-cing, and Monitoring. 

3) To assist the conference in the estab- 
lishment of new £aith communities, commu- 
nity/outreach ministries, revitalization of 
churches and development of new ones. 

4) To cooperate with the conference in collabo- 
ration with the respective Boards in the recruit- 
ment of pastors and diaconal ministers, the 
training of Hispanic and non-Hispanic lay mis- 
sioners and pastors-mentors, and the estab- 



196 



DCA Advance Edition 



lishment of institutes for continuing education and 
training for both pastors and laity. 

5) To interpret and advocate for justice issues 
which need to be recognized and addressed by the 
church and by society. 

6) To cooperate with the Conference Commit- 
tee on Ethnic Local Church Concerns in its efforts 
to incorporate racial and ethnic minority concerns 
and contributions within the life of the conference. 



^726. 

Petition Number: 21618-CO-726-D; GCOM. 

Annual Conference Council on Ministries 

Amend ^ 726: 

In each Annual Conference of The United Method- 
ist Church there shall be a conference Council on Min- 
istries or other structure to provide for the 
functions of the council and maintain the connec- 
tional relationships; provided that such council... 

2. Membership. — The membership of the Annual 
Conference Council on Ministries shall consist of the 
presiding bishop; the at least one district superinten- 
dents; rcprc9cntfltivc9 members of conference agen- 
cies and commiaaiona described in % ?39 728-741; 
conference secretary of global ministries 
(^731.3); representatives of other... 

[Second paragraph] The person or persons serving 
as members of the General Council on Ministries shall 
be member (s) of the Annual Conference Council on 
Ministries as full voting member (s)r except where 
such persons are staff persons of the Annual Con- 
ference Council on Ministries. In such cases the 
General Coxmcil On Ministries representative 
shall have voice, but not vote. 

5. Committees, Task Forces, and Consult- 
ations. — Tlie council shall appoint a Committee on Eth- 
nic Local Church Concerns or other structure to 
fulfill these functions and maintain the connec- 
tional relationships. In addition, the council... 

b) Committee on Hispanic Ministry. — Each annual 
conference shall create a Conference Conunittee 
on Hispanic Ministry or other structure to fulfill 
these ministries and maintain the connectional 
relationships. It will relate to all conference eigen- 
cies for tiie implementation of the Plan for His- 
panic Ministry as it has been adjusted for the 
conference. It is recommended that this commit- 
tee be composed of persons representing local 
Hispanic ministries as well as representatives 
fi'om those districts where there is a significant 
Hispanic population. A District Superintendent 
shall be a member of the committee in order to 
provide linkage with the Cabinet The committee 
membership shall reflect the conference diversity. 



The responsibihties of the committee shall be to 
work with the Conference Coimcil on Ministries or 
its equivalent in tiie coordination needed for the 
implementation of the Plan for Hispanic Ministry. 
Its function shall be: 

(a) To assist the Council on Ministries or 
equivalent imit to develop a conference plan for 
Hispanic ministry. 

(b) To assist the Council on Ministries or 
equivalent unit in the implementation of the Plan 
focusing on the components recommended by the 
National Hispanic Plan: Planning, Training, Re- 
sourcing, and Monitoring. 

(c) To assist the conference in tiie estab- 
lishment of new faith communities, commu- 
nity/outreach ministries, revitalization of 
chm-ches and development of new ones. 

(d) To cooperate with the conference in col- 
laboration with the respective Boards in the re- 
cruitment of pastors and diaconal ministers, the 
training of Hispanic and non-Hispanic lay mis- 
sioners and pastors-mentors, and the estab- 
hshment of institutes for continuing education 
and training for both pastors and laity. 

(e) To interpret and advocate for justice issues 
which need to be recognized and addressed by die 
church and by society. 

7. c) A Council Director may take up to three 
consecutive montiis leave from normal respwnsi- 
biUties for piuposes of reflection, study and self- 
renewal once during every six years of service. The 
Personnel Committee of the Conference Coimcil 
on Ministries or other appropriate group shall co- 
ordinate details pertaining to such leaves in con- 
sultation with the bishop. 

8. Staff. — ^All Annual Conference council executive 
staff may be employed by, shall be directed by; and 
amenable to the Annual Conference Council on Minis- 
tries. The Coimcil shall elect executive staff, upon 
nomination by the personnel committee. Insofar as 
possible, employees of the conference shall include 
women, men, racial and ethnic persons... 

^726. 

Petition Number: 20364-CO-726.2-D;NYK 

Membership of the Council on Ministries 

Amend ^ 726.2: 

2. Membership. — ^The membership of the Annual 
Conference Council on Ministries... two representatives 
of the conference youth organisation; two rcprc - 
scntativca of the conference United Methodist Women, 
one of whom shall be the president; two representatives 
of the conference United Methodist Men, one of whom 



Conferences 



197 



s hall be the president! two young adulta ; the conference 
lay leader; one lay person representative from each 
district; chairpersons of age - level and family depart - 
ments ! at least twelve additional persons, consist- 
ing of at least one from among each of the 
following: conference youth organization, United 
Methodist Women, United Methodist Men, young 
adults, and such additional persons as the annual con- 
ference may determine. Consideration shall be given to 
inclusiveness and to lay membership {% 103; ^ 113.). 

^726. 

Petition Number: 20431-CO-726.2-D;NMX. 

Membership 

Delete ^ 726.2 and replace with new text: 

2. Membership. — ^The membership of the structure 
provided shall be determined by the Annual Conference 
but shall nevertheless include the presiding bishop and 
the district superintendents and should include repre- 
sentatives of conference agencies, commissions, and 
organizations. Consideration should be given to repre- 
sentation of young adults and youth and to participation 
by staff of the Annual Conference and by one or more 
member(s) of the Council on Finance and Administra- 
tion. The structure may be assigned other duties and 
responsibilities and may have membership in common 
with other structures. 



1726. 

Petition Number: 20432-CO-726.3-D;NMX. 

Officers of Conference Council on Ministries 

Delete ^ 726.3 and replace with new text: 

3. Officers and Executive Committee. — The struc- 
ture shall elect officers and may appoint or elect 
an executive committee, which shall include the 
bishop. 

1726. 

Petition Number: 20433-CO-726.4-D;NMX. 

Executive Committee of the Conference Council 
on Ministries 

Delete ^ 726.4. 



1726. 

Petition Number: 20365-CO-726.5-D;NYK 

Committee Task Forces and Consultation 

Amend the first sentence of 'n726.5: 

5. The council shall appoint a Committee on Ethnic 
Local Church Concerns or equivalent structure. 

1726. 

Petition Number: 20366-CO-726.5-D;NYK 

Committee on Ethnic Local Church Concerns 

Amend the first sentence of ^ 726.5a: 

5.a) There shall be organized in each Annual Con- 
ference a Committee on Ethnic Local Church Concerns 
or equivalent structure. 

1726. 

Petition Number: 20434-CO-726.5-D;NMX. 

Committees,Task Forces, and Consultations 

Renumber current ^ 726.5 as ^ 726.4 and amend as 
follows: 

&4. Committees, Task Forces, and Consultations. — 
The council «hali may appoint a Committee on Ethnic 
Local Church Concerns, but in any event the Annual 
Conference will assign to a structure the perform- 
ance of the functions of that committee assigned 
hy'i726.4t(a). In addition, the council... discharging of 
its responsibilities. Nothing shall prevent combining 
the functions and personnel of committees, task 
forces or consultations. 

1726. 

Petition Number: 20435-CO-726.5-D;NMX. 

Committee on Ethnic Local Church Concerns 

Renumber existing ^726.5a; as ^726.4a; and 
amend as follows: 

B4.a) Committee on Ethnic Local Church Con- 
cerns. — ^There shall be organized in each Annual Con- 
ferences a Committee — ©n — Ethnic — Local — Church 
Concerns. It s hall cause the issue of ethnic local 
churches to be addressed through a structure 
which it determines to be appropriate. The struc- 
ture-4t shall relate to all conference agencies... ^fhe 
committee shall have representation on the Conference 
Council on Ministries. It shall develop criteria for use 
in evaluating racial/ethnic projects and programs within 
the conference and in reporting on its work to the 
structure performing the function of the Council on 
Ministries, if that structure is separate from the 



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DCA Advance Edition 



committee. It la recommended that the committee be 
compriacd of one third Iny^vomcn, one - third laymen, 
and one third clergy. It is further recommended that two 
youth be included and at least one half of the committee 
shall be racial/ethnic, where feasible. Consideration 
shall be given to representation from each district It 
shall also include a cabinet representative. The commit 
tee^-fi'indings will be referred to the conference Com- 
mission on Religion and Race, if separate from the 
committee. It will cooperate with the Commission on 
Religion and Race, if separate from the committee, 
in its efforts... 



^726. 

Petition Number: 20436-CO-726.5-D;NMX. 

Committee on Communications 

Renumber existing 'g 726.5W as ^ 726.4W and 
amend as follows: 

B4.b) Committee on Communication. — In each An- 
nual Conference Council on Ministries, or within the 
structure performing the functions thereof, chosen 
by4t and amenable t^, as determined by the Coim- 
cil, there may be a Committee on CommunicationT^t 
may assist the council in the performance of the respon - 
sibilities listed in 11 726.10g -t ", and may to perform such 
other functions relating to promotion of the pro- 
grams of the general church, and of the Jurisdic- 
tional, Central, and Annual Conferences, 
promotion of benevolences, and other commtini- 
cations and public relations functions as are as- 
signed to it by tfie council. A full - time conference or area 
staff person may be employed as director of communi- 
cations to assist the committee in earrj i ing out its func 
tions. perform such commimication functions as 
may be assigned. In the absence of a full - time staff 
person, responsibilities in communication shall may be 
assigned as a part of the work of a member of the 
conference staff, or otherwise provided for. 

^726. 

Petition Number: 20437-CO-726.5-D;NMX. 

Committee on Planning and Research 

Renumber existing 1[ 726.5c) as ^ 72G.Ac) and 
amend as follows: 

B4:.c) Committee on Planning and Research. — ft 
should not be deemed necessary for all members of the 
Annual Conferences may provide for the fulfill- 
ment of the functions of a Committee on Planning 
and Research to be members of the conference council. 
by structuring themselves as they deem appropri- 
ate. &tje-e©fteidefa#oft-8h©«M-fee-giveft-t^4he-ifte}tt8ie» 
in the membership of the committee persons with ex- 
pertise in planning and research. Its function shaU bc ! 
The Annual Conference or the Coimcil may deter- 



mine the membership of die structure. If ap- 
pointed, the Committee or structure may perform 
any or all of the following functions as assigned to it 
by the Council:.... 

^726. 

Petition Number: 20438-CO-726.5-D;NMX. 

Committee on Evaluation 

Renumber existing ^ 726.5</; as V26Ad) and 
amend as follows: 

S4.d) Committee on Evaluation. — It should not be 
deemed necessary for all members of the Annual Con- 
ferences may provide for the fulfillment of the 
functions assigned to the Committee on Evaluation 
by ^726 Ad) (1) and (2) by structuring themselves 
as they deem appropriate, to bc members of the 
conference council. Due consideration should bc given 
to the inclusion in the membership of committee per - 
sons with expertise in program review and evaluation. 
Its function shall bc: I f appointed, the Committee or 
structure may perform either or both of the follow- 
ing functions, and others, as assigned to it by the 
coimcil or equivalent.... 

^726. 

Petition Number: 20442-CO-726.5-D;NMX. 

Committee on Publishing House Liaison 

Renumber existing ^ 726.5e^ as % 726.4e^ and 
amend as follows: 

hA.e) Committee on Publishing House Liai- 
son. — There may be organised in each Annual Confer- 
ences may provide for the fulfillment of the 
functions assigned to a Committee on Publishing 
House Liaison by this \72&Ae) by structuring 
themselves as they deem appropriate. The commit - 
tee shall consist of three members nominated and 
elected by the Annual Conference. The committee shall 
have lay and clergy members. Members of the General 
Board of Publication shall be members ex officio. The 
committee chairperson shall bc a member of the Con - 
ference Council on Ministries. The committee... 



^726. 

Petition Number: 20491-CO-726.5-D;NNJ. 

Committees, Task Force, and Consultations 

Amend f 726.5: 

Committees, Task Forces, and Consultations. — ^The 
council shall appoint a Committee on Ethnic Local 
Church Concerns (or the responsibilities outlined 
below may be assigned to such other organization 



Conferences 



199 



as the Annual Conference provides pursuant to ^ 

707.1). In addition,... 



1726. 

Petition Number: 20492-CO-726.5-D;BMW, VIR. NEB, 
WPA,NNY. 

Other Committees and Responsibilities 

Delete "D 726.5i, e, and .10^-j. 

^726. 

Petition Number: 21299-CO-726.5-D; GBGM. 

Committees, Task Forces, and Consultations 

Amend ^ 726.5: 

5. Committees, Task Forces, and Consult- 
ations. — ^The council shall appoint a Committee on Eth- 
nic Local Church Concerns and a Committee on 
Hispanic Ministry. 

1726. 

Petition Number: 21366-CO-726.5-D; UMCOM. 

Committees, Task Forces, and Consultations 

Amend the second sentence of ^ 726.5: 

In addition, the council may appoint a Committee 
on Communication, a Committee on Planning and Re- 
search,... 

1726. 

Petition Number: 21367-CO-726.5-D; UMCOM. 
Committee on Communication 
Delete 1 726.56. 

1726. 

Petition Number: 21368-CO-726.5-D; UMCOM. 
Committee on Publishing House Liaison 
Delete "1 726.5e. 



1726. 

Petition Number: 20439-CO-726.6-D;NMX. 

Age-level and Family Ministries 

Renumber existing ^ 726.6 as ^ 726.5 and amend 
as follows: 

65. Age-Level and Family Ministries. — ^The council 
may establish councils or structures for and coordina- 
tors of children,... 

1726. 

Petition Number: 20440-CO-726.7-D;NMX. 

Director 

Renumber existing ^ 726.7a; as ^ 726.6c; and 
amend as follows: 

^.a) Director E xecutive Officer. — ^The council shall 
elect, or it or the Annual Conference may provide 
for the appointment of, upon nomination by the per - 
sonnel committee of the council or its equivalent, in 
consultation with the Cabinet, an executive officer who 
shall be given such title as the Annual Conference 
or the Coimcil may desire, to be Icnowm aa the con 
fcrcncc council director. The director executive offi- 
cer sMl should be present.. and other matters as the 
Cabinet and director the executive officer may deter- 
miner, but the executive officer The director shall not 
be present ..Alimit to the term of service for the director 
executive officer may be set by the Annual Conference. 

1726. 

Petition Number: 20441-CO-726.-D;NMX. 

Responsibilities 

Renumber existing ^ 726.7W as ^ 726.6W and 
amend as follows: 

?6.6; Responsibilities. — ^The responsibilities of the 
conferenc e council director executive officer shall be 
include, unless decided otherwise by the Annual 
Conference or the council or equivalent structure, 

but are not limited to the following:... 



1726. 

Petition Number: 21369-CO-726.10-D; UMCOM. 
Responsibilities 
Delete 1 726. lOi'. 



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DCA Advance Edition 



^726. 



^747. 



Petition Number: 21370-CO-726.10-D; UMCOM. 
Responsibilities 
Delete % 726.10/!. 

^726. 

Petition Number: 21371-CO-726.10-D; UMCOM. 
Responsibilities 
Delete ^726.10/. 

^747. 

Petition Number: 20068-CO-747-D;MOW, MOE. 

Committee on Ministry 

Add a new sentence at the end of ^ 747: 

The puurposes and functions of this committee 
may be assigned to an existing or newly created 
multifunctional agency of the Conference Coimcil. 

^747. 

Petition Number: 20310-CO-747-D;WPA 

Committee on Ministry to and with persons with 
Handicapping Conditions 

Amend 1 747: 

There may be a Committee on Ministry to and with 
Persons with Handicapping Conditions People with 
Disabilities in each Annual Conference... 

^747. 

Petition Number: 20476-CO-747-D;WNC, NTX. 

Committee on Ministry To and With Persons 
with Handicapping Conditions 

Delete ^ 747. 



Petition Number: 21472-CO-747-D; NIL & NCJ 
Accessibility Advocates Association. 

Annual Conference Committees 
on Disability Concerns 

Delete ^ 747 and replace with new text: 

There shall be in each annual conference a 
Committee on Disability Concerns. 

1. The basic membership of the committee 
shall be nominated and elected by established 
procedures of the annual conference. Each annual 
conference shall determine the number and com- 
position of the total membership. Membership 
shall include persons with physical disabilities 
and persons with mental disabilities. 

2. It shall be the responsibility of tiiis commit- 
tee: 

a. To be aware of the role of persons with 
disabilities in ministry, including ordained and 
diaconal ministries and local church and aiuiual 
conference leadership positions. 

b. To advocate for and help develop programs 
within the annual conference which meet the 
needs of persons with disabiUties. 

c. To be informed about current ministries 
within the annual conference that are related to 
persons with disabilities. 

d. To develop w^s to sensitize persons in 
leadership positions on issues that affect persons 
with disabilities and therefore the entire church. 

e. To foster cooperation among ministries 
within the annual conference that focus on specific 
disabilities (deaf^deafened/hard of hearing, de- 
velopment disabilities, mental retardation, mental 
illness, visual impairment, physical disabilities, 
etc.). 

f. To be a resource for local churches who are 
attempting to develop ministries which are attitu- 
dinally and architecturally accessible. 

g. To promote the full inclusion of persons 
with disabilities in the life of the local church and 
the annual conference. 

h. To participate in Jurisdictional Accessibility 
Associations in the sharing of knowledge and re- 
sotvces. 



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201 



TI752. 

Petition Number: 20069-CO-752-D;MOW, MOE. 

District Council on Ministries 

Amend TI 752: 

Each district of an Annual Conference may organize 
a district Council on Ministries or alternate structure 
hereafter referred to as district Council. 

1. Purpose. — ^The purpose of the district Council eft 
Ministries shall be... the Annual Conference Council on 
Ministries or alternate structure, and the general 
agencies.. .and to help the Annual Conference Council 
on Ministries or alternate structure in the perform- 
ance of its functions. 

2. Membership. — Each Annual Conference may de- 
termine the membership and the method of election of 
its district Councils on Ministries .. .It is recommended 
that a member of the Annual Conference Council on 
Ministries staff be included as a resource person in each 
district Council on Ministries .. .The Annual Conference 
may ask the District Conferences (^749) to elect the 
membership of the district Council on Ministries . 

3. Officers. — The officers of the district Council ©ft 
Ministries shall be the chairperson. ..The district super- 
intendent shall have executive oversight responsibility 
for the work of the district Council on Ministries . 

4. Responsibilities. — ^The responsibilities of the dis- 
trict Council on Ministries may be determined by the 
Annual Conference or the district Council on Ministries . 

i) To relate the Annual Conference Council on Min- 
istries or alternate structure and its staff... 

j) To make program and other recommendations to 
the Annual Conference Council on Ministries or alter- 
nate structure. 

n) To elect the lay representative (s) from the dis- 
trict to membership on the Annual Conference Council 
on Ministries or alternate structure when requested 
by the Annual Conference Council on Ministries that 
group. 



o) ...who shall serve on the district Council on Min - 
istries and chair the district... 

q) [2nd paragraph] The district Councils on Minis p 
fries in an Annual Conference shall cooperate with the 
Annual Conference Council on Ministries or alternate 
structure so that. .the Annual Conference Council on 
Ministries or alternate structure may require... 

[Third paragraph] The district Council on Mini s- 
fries may appoint a district coordinator of communica- 
tions to work in cooperation with the district and 
conference Councils on Ministries and with the confer- 
ence Committee on Communication, if organized. The 
district Council on Ministries may create.... 



5. Finances. — Each Annual Conference shall deter- 
mine the method by which its district Councils on Min - 
istries shall be financed. It is recommended that an 
amount for the general operating expense of the district 
Councils on Ministries be included.. .through the budget 
of the Annual Council on Ministries or alternate struc- 
ture or the appropriate... 

^752. 

Petition Number: 20194-CO-752-D;BMW. 

The District Council 

Amend ^ 752: 

Each district of an Annual Conference may organize 
a district Council on Ministries . 

1. Purpose. — ^The purpose of the district Council ©» 
Ministries shall be to assist local churches.. .and to help 
the Annual Conference Council on Ministries in the 
performance of its functions. 

2. Membership. — Each Annual Conference may de- 
termine the membership and the method of election of 
its district Council on Mini3trics ...It is recommended 
that a member of the Annual Conference Council on 
Ministries staff be included as a resource person in each 
district Council on Ministries .. .TTie Annual Conference 
may ask the District Conferences (^ 749) to elect the 
membership of the district Council on Ministries . 

3. Officers. — The officers of the district Council ©» 
Ministries shall be the chairperson.. .The district super- 
intendent shall have executive oversight responsibility 
for the work of the district Council on Ministries . 

4. Responsibilities. — ^The responsibilities of the dis- 
trict Council on Ministries may be determined by the 
Annual Conference or the district Council on Minis - 



i) To relate the Annual Conference Council on Min - 
istries agencies and its staff to local church needs. 

j) To make program and other recommendations to 
the Annual Conference agencies Council on Ministries . 

n) To elect the lay representative (s) from the dis- 
trict to membership on the Annual Conference agen- 
cies Council on Ministries when requested by the 
Annual Conference agencies Council on Ministries . 

o) The district superintendent, after consultation 
with the chairperson of the conference Board of Global 
Ministries or its equivalent and the conference secre- 
tary of global ministries, may appoint a district secretary 
of global ministries who shall serve on the district Coun- 
cil on Ministries and chair the district... 

q) [2nd paragraph] The district Councils on Minis - 
fries in an Annual Conference shall cooperate with the 
Annual Conference Council on Ministries so that a har- 



202 



DCA Advance Edition 



monious...the Annual Conference Council on Miniatrica 
agencies may require the district councils to submit 
their program plans for approval. 

The district Council on Ministries may appoint a 
district coordinator... The district Council on Ministries 
may create.... 

5. Finances. — Each Annual Conference shall deter- 
mine the method by which its district Councils on Min - 
istries shall be financed. It is recommended that an 
amount for the general operating expense of the district 
Councils on Ministries be included in the Annual Con- 
ference budget. As a general rule, major program expen- 
ditures for any district should be made through the 
budget of the Annual Conference Council on Ministries 
or the appropriate Annual Conference program board 
agency. 

^752. 

Petition Number: 20567-CO-752-D;WNC. 

Optional District Council 

Delete ^ 752 and substitute new text 

Each district of an Annual Conference may 
oi^anize a District Council. 



^752. 

Petition Number: 20311-CO-752.2-D;WPA 

Membership of the District CouncU on Ministries 

Amend the next to the last sentence of "J 752.2: 

Membership shall be chosen,. .. persons with handi - 
capping conditions people with disabilities, and racial 
and ethnic... 

^804. 

Petition Number: 20411-CO-804.2-D;NMX. 

Accountability of Receipts and Expenditures of Funds 
by all General Agencies 

Amend % 804 by numbering the existing para- 
graphs as .1 and .3 and inserting new text as .2: 

2. All the general agencies of the Church, in- 
cluding coimcils, boards, commissions, and com- 
mittees constituted by the General Conference, 
shall report their stewardship of the trust and 
confidence reposed and placed in diem by the 
Church, and by the people of the Church, in a 
format designed by the General Council on Minis- 
tries. The report, wiiether in print, video, audio, 
or combined, shall disclose how the trust and 
confidence was measured. A quadrennial report 
of such accoimting shall be included in the report 
of die General Council on Ministries as an addi- 
tion to the evaluation required by ^802.3. 



203 



DCA Advance Edition 



Proposed Resolutions 



Petition Number: 21036-CO-NonDis-O; NYK 

Enable Appointed Pastors to Vote for 
Jurisdictional and General Conference Delegates 

Whereas, anyone appointed as pastor to a local 
church bears all the responsibilities of an ordained elder 
in that local church; 

Whereas, 50% of the charges in the Hudson West 
District and 41.5% of the charges in the Hudson North 
District are served by pastors who are disenfranchised 
in Jurisdictional and General Conference elections; 

Whereas, 33.3% of the churches in the five boroughs 
of New York City with fewer than 200 members are 
served by pastors who are disenfranchised in Jurisdic- 
tional and General Conference elections; 

Whereas, justice demands an equal voice for small 
membership churches; 

Whereas, <p^ 38, 413.3 and 419.3 of The Book of 
Discipline restrict the franchise to members in full con- 
nection and laity; 

Whereas, it is demoralizing to be unable to partici- 
pate in these critical matters of representation; 

Whereas, General Conference enacts legislation 
concerning all categories of ministry, general and or- 
dained, and laity members in full connection are repre- 
sented while local pastors, associate members, and pro- 
bationers who are appointed to churches are not; 

Be it resolved, that General Conference enable 
United Methodist pastors who are under appointment, 
including probationers, associate members and li- 
censed local pastors who have completed one year of 
service in a local church and have completed one year 
in the course of study program or its equivalent, to vote 
for clergy delegates to Jurisdictional and General Con- 
ference. 



Petition Number: 21125-CO-NonDis-0$; BMW. 

Appoint a Task Force to Rewrite Sections 

of The Book of Discipline 

We petition the General Conference to appoint a 
task force and to authorize the task force to rewrite all 
Discipline sections on Annual Conference structure to 
specify function but not form, and present the results to 
the next General Conference. 



Petition Number: 20230-CO-NonDis-O;WYO. 

Voting Rights of Retired Clergy Members 

Whereas, there are suggestions to reduce the size 
of Annual Conferences, including removing the right of 
retired clergy members to vote at Annual Conference 
sessions; 

Whereas, we support the right of retired clergy 
members to vote at Annual Conference sessions; 

Be it resolved, that the right of retired clergy mem- 
bers to vote at Annual Conference sessions be contin- 
ued. 

Petition Number: 20231-CO-NonDis-O;BMW. 

Responsibility of Annual Conference Staff 
Persons 

We petition the General Conference to amend all 
sections of the Discipline that require specific Annual 
Conference staff persons (use of "shall") to reflect the 
responsibilities that must be fulfilled but not dictate the 
person or persons carrying out the function. 

Petition Number: 20232-CO-NonDis-O$;SGA, NTX. 

Change in Content of The Book of Discipline 

We petition the 1996 General Conference to switch 
the order of Part III and Part IV in The Book of Discipline. 
Under this proposal, the content of Part IV (The Minis- 
try of All Christians) would appear before Part III (The 
Social Principles) . 

Petition Number: 20233-CO-NonDis-O$;NWT. 

Revise The Book of Discipline 

Whereas, %f 101-2628 of the Book of Discipline 
contain language that is duplicative, unnecessary, and 
ambiguous; 

Be it resolved, that the 1996 General Conference 
take the following steps: 

1. Authorize a committee to prepare a revised ver- 
sion of The Book of Discipline. 

2. Request the said committee to present its revised 
version of The Book of Discipline to the General Confer- 
ence in the year 2000. 



Conferences 



204 



Petition Number: 20249-CO-NonDis-O;NEB. 

Index to The Book of Discipline to Show 
the Membership/Lay Participation 

Whereas: 

1. Membership in The United Methodist Church 
has been on a general decline. 

2. Worship attendance and lay participation have a 
high correlation. 

3. Active members generally share more of their 
resources, including financial support, with their 
church. 

4. As the need for clergy increases, greater reliance 
will need to be placed on lay participation. 

5. Neither lay participation nor attendance is even 
indexed in The Book of Discipline. 

Therefore, be it resolved, that The Book of Discipline 
of The United Methodist Church be revised to incorporate 
the following changes: 

Index of Discipline — this reference to be added: 

Attendance— ^^ 230, 235, 253e 

Lay Participation — See Ministry of the Laity 

Membership See Church Membership 

Implemented by: Editors of The Book of Discipline. 

Petition Number: 20264-CO-NonDis-O;EPA 

Approach Legislation on "JI 71.F and AU Matters 
at General Conference with Prayer and Openess 

The Eastern Pennsylvania Conference of The 
United Methodist Church petitions the 1996 General 
Conference to approach legislation on ^ 7IF and all 
matters at the 1996 General Conference with prayer and 
openness to God's Spirit. 

Petition Number: 20304-CO-NonDis-O;WPA, GBCS. 

Implementing the "People First" Language 

Whereas, the General Conference of The United 
Methodist Church rewrote the 1992 Discipline OT2521, 
2533.6 and 2544.4c) requiring the elimination of dis- 
crimination in both physical and attitudinal barriers; and 

Whereas, American Disabilities Act (ADA) prohib- 
its discrimination against people with disabilities in all 
areas including descriptive language, changing "the 
Handicapped" to "people with disabilities," "individuals 
with disabilities," and "the disabled"; and 



Whereas, the state laws of many states have adopted 
for all agencies, boards, or commissions the "people 
first" language when referring to people with disabili- 
ties; and 

AVhereas, this language is more respectful to the 
dignity of the individual and does not describe the medi- 
cal malady, and the goal of inclusiveness should begin 
in recognizing that individuals with disabilities are "peo- 
ple first" with rights, aspirations and talents possessed 
by all of us; and 

Whereas, empowerment, inclusiveness, and heal- 
ing begins with the way we refer to ourselves and each 
other; 

Therefore, be it resolved, that all church docu- 
ments, agencies, boards or commissions, and local 
churches will use "people first" language; and 

Be it further resolved, that the wording in The Book 
of Discipline be changed, and that anywhere the phrase 
"Mentally, Physically, and Psychologically Handicap- 
ping Conditions" appears it be changed to "individuals 
with disabilities," or "people with disabilities," where 
applicable. 



Petition Number: 20541-CO-NonDis-O$;KSW, KSE, 
SCJT.F. on Proposed KC Episcopal Area. 

The Jurisdictional System of Organization 

Be it resolved, that the 1996 General Conference 
authorize the appointment of a task force which shall 
examine the current jurisdictional system in the United 
States, develop a plan to improve this system and its 
boundaries by providing for effective, unified ministry 
in metropolitan areas, and/or propose an alternate sys- 
tem for fulfilling the mission of The United Methodist 
Church. Any plan should consider enabling the appoint- 
ment of episcopal leadership across regional lines. The 
task force shall be an inclusive group appointed by the 
Council of Bishops and shall consist of one lay and one 
clergy member from each Jurisdiction, two bishops, and 
five persons selected for inclusiveness. The task force 
shall present a proposal to the General Conference of 
2000 AD. 



Petition Number: 20542-CO-NonDis-O$;KSE, SCJT.F. 
on Proposed K. C. Episcopal Area. 

MetropoUtan-Based Episcopal Areas 

Whereas, "at the turn of the century, 39.7% of the 
population lived in urban areas and 60.3% resided in rural 
areas, in 1990, 75.2% of the population resided in urban 
areas and 24.8% lived in rural areas." (General Board of 
Global Ministi-ies Bulletin, 1993); and 

Whereas, 98.2% of the U. S. population now lives 
within 50 miles of a city; and 



205 



DCA Advance Edition 



Whereas, the disciplinary formula for the creation 
of a new episcopal area limits the possibility of the 
placement of a resident bishop in every metropolitan 
area; and 

Whereas, the population of Greater Kansas City is 
1,566,000, making it the 25th largest metropolitan area 
in the nation, and yet this area which encompasses two 
annual conferences does not have a resident bishop; and 

Whereas, the Kansas City Episcopal Area Task 
Force of the South Central Jurisdiction (established by 
the 1992 South Central Jurisdictional Conference to 
explore the viability of a Kansas City Episcopal Area) 
found that the United Methodist population of Kansas 
and Missouri was inadequate to sustain three episcopal 
areas; and 

Whereas, it is essential to provide viable, visible, 
responsive, cohesive ministry to congregations in a 
growing cultural, racial and ethnically diverse popula- 
tion In urban areas; and 

Whereas, state lines artificially fragment services, 
diffuse comprehensive planning for congregational de- 
velopment/redevelopment, and frustrate the design of 
a misslonal strategy for responding to emerging urban 
needs; 

Therefore, be it resolved, that the 1996 General 
Conference of The United Methodist Church authorize 
the appointment of a task force which shall examine 
Paragraph 731.5J of The Book of Discipline, the current 
jurisdictional system, the present boundaries of the epis- 
copal areas and the assignment of the bishops in the 
United States, and the impact on urban areas that cross 
state and jurisdictional lines. This task force shall be 
appointed by the Council of Bishops and shall consist of 
one lay and one clergy member from each Jurisdiction, 
two bishops, and five persons selected for inclusiveness. 
The task force shall report to the General Conference of 
The United Methodist Church in 2000 AD. 



Petition Number: 21646-CO-NonDis-O; GCOM. 

Persons with Disabilities 

In all instances where they appear in The Book of 
Discipline, change phrases with wording that includes 
"mentally, physically, and psychologically handicapping 
conditions" or "persons with handicapping condi- 
tion (s)" to "individuals with disabilities" or as appropri- 
ate, to "people with disabilities." 

This will be changed in the following paragraphs 
and others: %1 72, 76, 250, 251, 259, 260, 263, 306, 414, 
439, 628, 707. 729, 730, 731, 735, 740, 747, 752, 757, 759, 
805, 815, 1209, 1210, 1221, 1440, 1441, 1442, 1515, 2519, 
2521, 2533, 2544, 2628. 



The General Conference Instructs the editor of The 
Book of Discipline, 1996 and The Book of Resolutions to 
make these changes and adjust other language for con- 
sistency. 



Petition Number: 21673-CO-NonDis-O; NIL and NCJ 
Accessibility Associations. 

Jurisdictional Accessibility Advocates 
Association 

Whereas, the Social Principles of The United Meth- 
odist Church affirm the commitment of the Church to 
the rights of persons with disabilities {% 72G, Rights of 
Persons With Handicapping Conditions); and 

Whereas, society is becoming increasingly sensi- 
tive and aware of the rights of persons with disabilities; 
and 

Whereas, The United Methodist Church has con- 
tinued to recognize the rights of persons with disabilities 
through the adoption of resolutions by recent General 
Conferences, the establishment of programs, and the 
creation of agencies and other bodies which focus on 
ministry with persons with disabilities; and 

Whereas, despite the exemption of religious organi- 
zations and private clubs from the Americans with Dis- 
abilities Act of 1990 (ADA), the 1992 General Confer- 
ence adopted resolutions agreeing that The United 
Methodist Church will voluntarily comply with the ADA; 
and 

Whereas, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 
1990 (ADA) has been described as the most Important 
piece of civil rights legislation since the Civil Rights Act 
of 1964; and 

Whereas, Annual Conference Committees on Dis- 
ability Concerns need resourcing and networking with 
such committees in other conferences such as has 
proven beneficial in the North Central Jurisdiction; and 

Whereas, the 1992 Discipline (^ 630) says that "In 
each jurisdiction there may be jurisdictional program 
agencies related to the general program agencies and 
the appropriate Annual Conference program agencies." 

Therefore, there shall be added in this section of the 
Discipline a new paragraph which states: There shall be 
created In each Jurisdiction an Accessibility Advocates 
Association to share knowledge and resources about 
disability concerns. Membership shall Include repre- 
sentative members from each of the Annual Conference 
Committees on Disability Concerns in their Jurisdiction 
(or from Divisions on Health and Welfare Ministries 
where Disability Concerns committees have not yet 
been formed). 



Conferences 



206 



Petition Number: 20772-CO-NonDis-O$;WVA 

General Commission on Inclusiveness 
of Persons with Handicapping Conditions 

Whereas, the General Conference of The United 
Methodist Church has taken previous actions toward 
being inclusive of all persons for whom God has demon- 
strated love and care through Christ and the Church in 
the Social Principles and by promoting programs for 
sensitizing and encouraging the Church at all levels of 
organization to serve the needs of persons with handi- 
capping conditions; and 

Whereas, The United Methodist Church has estab- 
lished a tradition of inclusion and outreach to all persons 
through Commissions on Religion and Race, the Status 
and Role of Women, and a Commission on Aging in the 
West Virginia Annual Conference, among others; and 

Whereas, The United Methodist Church through 
various boards and agencies, such as Global Ministries 
and Discipleship, have promoted programs inde- 
pendently for persons with handicapping conditions; 
and 

Whereas, there are over six hundred members of 
the clergy in addition to thousands of lay persons with 
handicapping conditions within The United Methodist 
Church; 

Therefore, be it resolved, that the proposed com- 
mission initiate a course of study of programs of inclu- 
sion already at work on the Annual Conference and local 
levels in The United Methodist Church and in other 
denominations. Programs determined to be of merit 
would then be promoted and administered through the 
proposed commission to all levels of The United Meth- 
odist Church; and 

Be it further resolved, that this commission instruct 
the General and Local Church in the strategic incorpo- 
ration and utilization of persons with handicapping con- 
ditions. This shall be accomplished through the devel- 
opment of comparable commission on the Annual 
Conference level so that projects may be specifically 
geared to the needs of those with handicapping condi- 
tions already within the Church and those that may be 
potentially included within the religious community, 
and so that these projects may be a concerted effort by 
the General and Local Church to this end; and 

Be it further resolved, that the aforementioned com- 
mission is necessary to make church members aware of 



the need to accept, include, and respond with Christian 
love to the special needs of persons with handicapping 
conditions. This commission shall therefore be called 
The General Commission on the Inclusiveness of Per- 
sons with Handicapping Conditions. 

Petition Number: 20870-CO-NonDis-O; United Meth- 
odist Appalachian Development Committee. 

A Day at General Conference to Address Central 
Conference Issues 

The United Methodist Appalachian Development 
Committee petitions the Commission on the General 
Conference for 1996 to provide for a means of address- 
ing issues and concerns important to the ministries and 
mission of the Central Conferences and to schedule a 
time in the plenary sessions of the Conference to ad- 
dress thoroughly such issues and concerns. 



Petition Number: 20871-CO-NonDis-O; Conference 
Board of Diaconal Ministry, EPA 

Representation of Diaconal Ministers among 

those elected to General and Jurisdictional 

Conferences 

Whereas, all Christians are called to ministry wher- 
ever Christ would have them serve (1992 Discipline, ^^ 
10&-107);and 

Whereas, The United Methodist Church recog- 
nizes two forms of representational ministry within the 
body of Christ: ordained clergy and diaconal ministers 
(1992 Discipline, ^ 12, 108-110); and 

Whereas, the Discipline provides for representation 
of both laity and ordained clergy to the General and 
Jurisdictional Conferences of The United Methodist 
Church (1992 Discipline, 1^ 12, 602, and 614); and 

Whereas, diaconal ministers, as well as ordained 
clergy and laity, may be called and have the gifts to serve 
as delegates to the General and Jurisdictional Confer- 
ences; 

Therefore, be it resolved, that the 1996 General 
Conference provide structures that encourage propor- 
tional representation of diaconal ministers as delegates 
to the General and Jurisdictional Conferences of The 
United Methodist Church. 



DCA Advance Edition 



Discipleship 



THE GENERAL CONFERENCE OF THE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 



Volume 1 



Nashville, Tennessee 



Report of The General Board of Discipleship, 1993-1996 



Introduction 

The General Board of Discipleship observed its 
twenty-fourth anniversary in 1996. Acting on the 
recommendations of the Structure Study Committee, 
the 1972 General Conference established the General 
Board of Discipleship to serve in a number of areas of 
major importance to the local church. 

Among all the general agencies of TTie United 
Methodist Church, the General Board of Discipleship 
was the one given the major responsibility for the 
support of receiving, nurturing, caring, and sending 
ministries of congregations. Responsible for providing 
for focused and integrated ministries in congregations 
and annual conferences, the Board has enhanced the 
ministries of lay persons and pastors as they have been 
in service to their members and to their communities 
for the past twenty-four years. 

The work of the General Board of Discipleship is 
particularly guided by Part IV of The Book of Discipline, 
"The Ministry of All Christians," (especially "n^ 
101-107). Of particular significance are the following 
words from ^ 104: 'The heart of Christian ministry is 
Christ's ministry of outreaching love. Christian ministry 
is the expression of the mind and mission of Christ by a 
community of Christians that demonstrates a common 
life of gratitude and devotion, witness and service, 
celebration and discipleship." 

Within this broad context for ministry in The United 
Methodist Church, the major directive given by the 
General Conference for the General Board of 
Discipleship is found in its statement of purpose, % 1201, 
The Book of Discipline. 1992. It reads: 

"Purpose. 1. There shall be a General Board of 
Discipleship, the purpose of which is found within the 
expression of the total mission of the Church outlined 
in the objectives of mission. Its primary purpose shall be 
to assist Annual Conferences, districts, and local 
churches of all membership sizes in their efforts to win 
persons to Jesus Christ as his disciples and to help these 
persons to grow in their understanding of God that they 
may respond in faith and love, to the end that they may 



know who they are and what their human situation 
means, increasingly identifying themselves as children 
of God and members of the Christian community, to live 
in the Spirit of God in every relationship, to fulfill their 
common discipleship in the world, and to abide in 
Christian hope. 

2. The board shall use its resources to enhance the 
meaning of membership as defined in ^"J 211-215 which 
emphasizes the importance of the identification of 
church membership with discipleship to Jesus Christ. 
The board shall work with persons and through 
structures, such as districts and Annual Conferences, to 
lead and assist local churches in becoming communities 
of growing Christians, celebrating and communicating 
the redeeming and reconciling love of God as revealed 
in Jesus Christ to persons of every age, racial and ethnic 
background, and social condition, and to advocate and 
encourage the development of new congregations." 

In the course of the 1993-1996 quadrennium the 
staff and members of the General Board of Discipleship 
have been engaged in an ongoing discussion of the 
vision, mission and core processes of the Board. These 
have been developed in the light of understanding the 
call to be disciples of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ 
and of our distinctive Wesleyan practice of the Christian 
faith. The vision, purpose and core processes of the 
Board also have been shaped by qualify concepts and 
principles. 

One of the major consequences of this discussion 
has been the shaping and statement of the primary task 
of the local congregation. Also developed is an 
articulation of the core process or primary task of the 
Board in its work of assisting local congregations and 
their leaders to achieve their primary task. This core 
process of the Board, briefly stated, is to 1) listen to the 
needs of those whom we serve, 2) receive requests for 
resources, 3) research these requests and assess the 
abilify of the agency to respond, 4) plan for responses to 
the requests, 5) produce materials and training 
opportunities, 6) market resources, 7) provide training 
to support the resources, and 8) evaluate the use of 
resources in congregations to constantly improve those 
resources. 



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In order to accomplish its mission, the Board has 
developed major guiding concepts for its current activity 
and future planning. In summary these are: 

1. The General Board of Discipleship provides 
quality resources for the many aspects of ministry of the 
Church and for the spiritual growth and nurture of the 
individual Christian. These resources help church 
leaders build systems that enable every congregation to 
fulfill its primary task. That task as described in ^ 244, 
The Book of Discipline, includes: "...reaching out and 
receiving with joy all who will respond; encouraging 
people in their relationship with God and inviting them 
to commitment to God's love in Jesus Christ; providing 
opportunities for them to seek strengthening and 
spiritual formation; and supporting them to live lovingly 
and justly in the power of the Holy Spirit as faithful 
disciples." 

2. The Board is committed to assisting the Church 
to mature in the Wesleyan spirit of holiness. The Board 
provides motivation and resources to assist the Church 
at every level to participate in God's continuing 
redemption through Jesus Christ. 

3. The Board is committed to presenting a confident 
witness to the Christian faith. The Board believes that it 
is to state clearly and confidendy the core of Christ's 
message of grace and salvation. 

4. The Board is committed to working in and 
through the whole of The United Methodist Church to 
engender a climate of renewal. The Board will use its 
resources to foster a climate of hope and renewal in the 
lives of individual Christians, congregations, and the 
denomination. 

The General Board of Discipleship carries the major 
responsibility for supporting the ministries of 
congregations. No other general agency is assigned this 
task. The Board has sensed the yearning of pastors and 
members for evangelistic outreach to the community in 
the name of Christ, for Bible study and spiritual growth 
and development, for fellowship and caring ministries, 
and for training and guidance for service in the local 
community and the world. In addition, the Board is 
committed to helping leaders improve their ministry 
processes and systems in annual conferences and 
congregations. 

The administrative functions of the Board are 
divided into five units: 

1. The Office of the General Secretary and general 
administration; 

2. The Office of Financial Services; 

3. The Office of Human Resources; 

4. Discipleship Resources; 

5. Building Services. 



In addition, there are five ministry units of the 
Board, focusing on primary groups that are served by 
the Board: laity, congregational leaders, laity leaders, 
and annual conference leaders. These five units are 
devoted to the development and delivery of resources 
and services for individual members, congregations, 
districts, and annual conferences. These units and their 
primary work are: 

1. Spiritual Formation (The Upper Room) provides 
spiritual formation resources for all laity and 
congregational leaders. 

2. Laity in Ministry provides resources and training 
support for leaders in Christian Education and 
Age-Level Ministries, Ministry of the Laity, Covenant 
Discipleship, United Methodist Men, Ethnic Local 
Church Concerns, and Family Ministries. 

3. Congregational Leadership provides resources 
and training support for pastors and congregational laity 
leaders in Evangelism, Stewardship, and Worship. 

4. Quality Improvement Office provides resources 
and training support for conference leaders who seek to 
improve the ministry processes and systems in their 
area. 

5. Church School Publications provides curriculum 
resources to support the learning arenas for children, 
youth, and adults. 

The work of each of these units, along with that of 
Discipleship Resources, for the 1993-96 quadrennium is 
briefly summarized in the following sections. 

Spiritual Formation (The Upper Room) 

The General Conference has given responsibility to 
the General Board of Discipleship "to interpret and 
communicate the biblical and theological basis for the 
devotional life which takes seriously both personal and 
corporate worship and Christian involvement in the 
worid" (^ 1215.1). To tiiat end. The Upper Room 
provides resources both media-based and experiential 
to help persons grow in their relationship with God. 

Guided by a vision of a network of persons and 
congregations who are seeking God, who are building 
a vision of new life in Christ, and who are nurturing one 
another by sharing their experience of God's love and 
guidance, the staff of The Upper Room have expanded 
their work into several new areas of interest during the 
1993-1996 quadrennium. 

In conjunction with the entire General Board of 
Discipleship, The Upper Room is implementing a new 
system for supporting church leaders with resources for 
spiritual formation in the congregation. The new system 
has three components: 

1. A network of leaders, congregations, and 
conferences who choose to collaborate with The Upper 



Discipleship 



209 



Room to build knowledge and equip leadership for 
spiritual formation in the church; 

2. A new series of resources for church leadership 
entitled "Pathways in Spiritual Growth: Resources for 
Congregations and Leadership," which will include 
books and other media for leaders and small groups in 
the church; and 

3. Comprehensive support to the church through 
conferences, training, and consultations aimed at 
supporting church leaders who desire to grow as 
spiritual leaders. 

The Walk to Emmaus, which began in 1978, has 
grown dramatically from 140 "Emmaus communities" in 
5 countries in 1991 to 320 communities in 12 countries 
in 1995. Emmaus groups are active in most annual 
conferences. Chrysalis, the high-school and college-age 
expression of Emmaus, has expanded to 125 active 
groups in 4 countries since its beginning in 1984. 

The Academy for Spiritual Formation continues to 
grow. Academies 10 and 11 are underway in 
Burlingame, California, and Camp Sumatanga, 
Alabama. With the conclusion of these academies, 600 
participants will have completed the two-year academy. 
Other academies are continually in planning. Five-day 
Academies are expanding as well. Approximately 3,100 
people have participated in 69 of these academies 
through April, 1996. One noteworthy development is the 
interest shown by other denominations in launching 
their own academies through The Upper Room. 
Southern Baptists are currently making plans to sponsor 
two Five-day Academies and a Two-year Academy in the 
futiire. 

In 1994 The Upper Room initiated the Network of 
Spiritual Discernment Churches. The initial goal was to 
identify 25 churches that wanted to move toward 
spiritual discernment and consensus decision making 
as an alternative to the adversarial system of Roberts' 
Rules of Order. As of June 1, 1995, there were more than 
300 churches in the spiritual discernment network. 
'Teaching Churches" have begun to teach their people 
about spiritual discernment and consensus and have 
begun to implement this new way of being the church. 
"Inquiring Churches" are interested in discernment and 
are learning from the 'Teaching Churches," but have 
not yet begun implementation. The Upper Room 
circulates a newsletter to share learnings from the 
'Teaching Churches." 

On March 1, 1995, in conjunction with the 60th 
anniversary of the publication of The Upper Room 
magazine, the International Center for Christian 
Spirituality was officially opened. The center functions 
through three avenues: 

1. the located center, 

2. the traveling center, and 

3. the global network. 



The located center is in the House of Prayer and 
Compassion in Nashville, Tennessee. It includes the 
center's offices as well as space for guided retreats and 
three daily prayer services. The traveling center is a 
team of persons who consult in spiritual growth and 
guidance and lead refreats. The global network is an 
information system that includes names of people, 
places of retreat, and resources to help Christian 
leaders. The center is also sponsoring a Doctor of 
Ministry program in spirituality in conjunction with 
Wesley Theological Seminary. 

Other program ministries of The Upper Room 
continue to evolve. The Upper Room's ministry of 
healing and wholeness is expanding beyond the original 
focus of the Adventure of Healing and Wholeness, 
which was the implementation of a healing and holy 
communion ministry in congregations. It is moving 
toward a focus on the lifestyle of healing and wholeness. 
A Closer Walk with God, a spin-off from the Academy 
for Spiritual Formation that focuses on African 
American spirituality, is being revitalized and 
relaunched in new areas of the US. The Upper Room 
prayer ministry continues to grow both in numbers of 
calls received (over 9,500 calls per month in 1995), 
numbers of local church covenant prayer groups (450) , 
and numbers of church groups becoming short-term 
"remote prayer centers" by answering calls as they are 
automatically fransferred from Nashville to the site of 
the volunteer group (450 in 1995). The Upper Room 
Chapel and Museum continue to attract thousands of 
visitors each year. The museum has been relocated in a 
newly renovated space and includes Christian art and 
artifacts from many cultures. The Prayer and Bible 
Conference continues to be held at Lake Junaluska in 
July each summer. This conference features nationally 
known preachers, teachers, and leaders in the area of 
Christian spirituality. 

In addition to its program ministries, The Upper 
Room publishes books. The Upper Room magazine. El 
Aposento Alto, Pockets, Alive Now, Weavings, and a 
devotional magazine for youth. 

Growth of The Upper Room magazine during this 
quadrennium reflects our changing world situation. 
Polish, Bulgarian, and Estonian language editions have 
been introduced in Eastern Europe. The Upper Room 
provided meditations and supported their translation 
into Russian for a resource tentatively tided Living in 
Christ Day by Day, to be circulated in the 
Commonwealth of Independent States (formerly the 
Soviet Union). First-time publication began in the 
Vaiphei language to minister to the Vaiphei tribe in 
Myanmar (formerly Burma) and to Vaiphei persons 
relocating to India from Myanmar. The first tri-lingual 
edition, a Korean/Japanese/English edition, began 
publication in 1994. This reflects the world interest in 
learning and teaching English and reaches out to a new 
audience. The French edition moved from Haiti to 
Zurich, Switzerland, beginning with the 1993 issues. 



210 



DCA Advance Edition 



The Upper Room magazine is currently published in 
66 editions, in 44 languages, in more than 80 countries. 
Circulation in the United States is stable at 2.25 million 
copies; worldwide circulation is just under three million 
copies of each issue. 

Changes in the United States include expanded use 
of technology to better serve our readers. 

Mailing of the regular and large-print editions is 
now being done by remote mailers outside Nashville 
(where editorial offices are located) . Subscriptions and 
orders for all Upper Room magazines are received by 
telephone via toll-fi-ee 800-numbers. The number to call 
about personal subscriptions is 1-800-925-6847. The 
number for all other orders is 1-800-972-0433. 

Daily devotions from The Upper Room magazine are 
offered in an automated, telephone dial-in format 
through an agreement with Tribune Media Services. 
Subscribers to this automated news network can hear 
the daily devotions each day in 80 medium-sized 
markets such as Cleveland, Ohio; Rochester, 
Minnesota; Sacramento, California; Tucson, Arizona; 
and Orlando, Florida. 

The General Board of Discipleship gave approval 
for The Upper Room to explore publishing electronic 
products based on The Upper Room magazine and on 
Pockets magazine for children. Preliminary testing was 
done in late 1994 and early 1995. Staff are continuing 
work to develop and refine products for use on personal 
computers and in electronic networks, though firm 
publication and marketing dates have not been set 

The Upper Room continues to participate with the 
General Board of Discipleship in investigating other 
avenues of electronic communication. We are 
cooperating with the United Methodist Publishing 
House and United Methodist Communications in 
Nashville and with United Methodist agencies in other 
cities to explore use of the Internet and electronic 
bulletin-board systems to allow more immediate 
communication with local churches and individuals. 

'De]iveryda.tesior El Aposento Alto in South America 
are coordinated with delivery dates within the United 
States through a distribution center in Santiago, Chile. 
Other distribution centers are Mexico City, Santo 
Domingo, Madrid, and Barcelona. El Aposento Alto is 
also widely distributed among Hispanic communities in 
the US. 

Pockets devotional magazine for children ages 6-12 
has experienced steady growth since its inception in 
1981. Over the past quadrennium circulation reached an 
all-time high of more than 99,000. In 1995 another 16 
pages, all four-color, were added to the magazine. The 
additional pages allowed for joumaling pages, an extra 
page for "Pocketsful of Scripture," a four-page pullout in 
the center intended for younger readers and more 
stories and games. 



With its March/April 1995 issue. Alive Now 
introduced a refocused and redesigned magazine that 
intentionally supports the spiritual lives of small groups 
as well as individuals. As in the past, each issue 
addresses a contemporary topic as it relates to the 
spiritual life. Popular issues over the quadrennium have 
dealt with AIDS, baptism, priorities, and addiction. The 
January/February 1996 issue marked the twenty-fifth 
anniversary of the magazine. 

Weavings: A Journal of the Christian Spiritual Life 
will celebrate its tenth anniversary in 1996. The journal 
seeks to promote informed, committed spiritual growth 
by providing resources for spiritual leadership and 
exploring how God's life and human lives are being 
woven together in the world. Selected articles from 
Weavings have been compiled in two books published 
by The Upper Room: The Weavings Reader: Living with 
God in the World (1993) and Communion, Community, 
Commonweal: Resources for Spiritual Leadership (1995) . 
Published bi-monthly, Weavings has dealt with a wide 
range of themes including failure, anger, gratitude, 
listening, commitment, and virtue. 

Upper Room Books publishes books and other 
resources that offer individuals and faith communities 
the possibility and promise of a more intimate, 
transforming relationship with God. Its ministry is to 
assist people in their journey to spiritual maturity. 
"Pathways in Spiritual Growth: Resources for 
Congregations and Leadership," previously mentioned, 
will offer various books and workbooks to help 
congregational leaders and congregations in growing 
together in the spiritual life. Upper Room Books 
introduced a customized Bible, The Upper Room 
Companion Bible, in the Fall of 1995 for users of The 
Upper Room magazine. The annually published The 
Upper Room Disciplines, which has nurtured spiritual 
growth for thirty-six years, continues to be a best seller. 
Additionally, Upper Room Books continues to offer a 
variety of resources that address the Christian 
devotional life and its intersection with daily life. 

Laity in Ministry 

Guided by the vision of God's people transforming 
the world, the Laity in Ministry staff provide resources 
and training which equip laity to be in ministry in their 
congregations and communities. These resources and 
services help leaders in congregations and annual 
conferences to focus on the primary task of ministry in 
congregations. 

The key people addressed through the work of the 
Laity in Ministry Unit are elected laity leaders in 
congregations, family ministry leaders, teaching 
ministry administrators, small group leaders, 
community and outreach ministry leaders, age-level and 
scouting coordinators. United Methodist Men's leaders, 
and leaders in racial ethnic congregations. 



Discipleship 



211 



Christian Education and Age-Level Ministries 

Two of the responsibilities given to the General 
Board of Discipleship related to Christian education and 
Age-Level Ministries are: 

"...the development of a clear statement of the 
biblical and theological foundations of Christian 
education, consistent with the doctrines of The United 
Methodist Church and the purpose of the board" (^ 
1207.1); and 

"...to encourage persons to commit themselves to 
Christ and membership in his Church; to learn about 
and participate in the Christian faith and life, including 
study of the Bible, and to develop skills which enable 
them to become effectively involved in the ministry of 
God's people in tiie worid" (^ 1207.2). 

The ministries of Christian education form the 
center for learning and faith sharing in the 
congregation. These ministries provide opportunities 
for people of all ages to be invited into relationship with 
God through Jesus Christ, to grow in their faith, and to 
practice living their faith in the world. The teaching and 
learning community of the congregation is essential to 
the development of mature Christians. Teaching and 
learning occur in the traditional settings of Sunday 
School and in varieties of small groups, which range in 
size and style from basic fellowship groups to committed 
Covenant Discipleship and Bible study groups. In 
addition, teaching and learning take place wherever 
people gather-at home, at work, at school, in the 
community. 

Work teams on small groups, age-level and scouting 
coordinators, and teaching ministry administrators 
respond to the needs of Christian education and 
age-level ministries by supporting congregations in 
their efforts to develop a comprehensive educational 
ministry with children, youth, and adults. The staff have 
developed several basic and fundamental resources. 
Examples of these resources are: 

Foundations: Shaping the Ministry of Christian 
Education in Your Congregation and Foundations: 
Training Guides provide foundational materials for the 
development of effective Christian education ministries 
in congregations. 

Planning for Christian Education: A Practical Guide 
for Your Congregation provides helps for defining the 
purposes and plans for the teaching ministry of 
congregations. This important guide helps leaders with 
recruitment of teachers and suggestions for ways to 
adapt curriculum resources. 

Friends in Faith: Mentoring Youth in the Church 
builds on the concept of faith partners found in 
confirmation materials and extends this image of 
mentoring throughout youth ministry. 



Tlie First Three Years supports parents and 
children's ministry leaders as they seek to provide 
ministry to the youngest members of our faith families. 
This practical guidebook encourages active ministry 
with infants, toddlers, and two-year-olds. 

Reality Check involves youth and youth leaders in 
the processes needed for development of strong and 
vital ministries with youth. This guide builds on the 
materials found in the United Methodist Youth 
Fellowship Handbook. 

Designing a Ministry by, with, and for Older Adults 
supports leaders who wish to harness the talents and 
energies of older and younger people alike who seek to 
be in ministry with those over 65 years of age. 

The Civic Youth-Serving Agencies/Scouting packet 
provides basic information for congregations who seek 
to reach out and involve children and youth from the 
community in the life of their congregation. This 
resource helps congregations connect civic youth- 
serving agencies with the faith formation of children and 
youth. 

In addition to providing resources for age-level and 
Christian education leaders, staff work to develop vital 
networks that bring leaders fi-om all sizes and locations 
of churches together for common support and learning. 
These networks are enhanced by knowledge of one 
another and by participating in common learning 
experiences. As a part of its Christian education and 
age-level ministries strategies, the staff has developed a 
series of ongoing events that strengthen ministries with 
specific leaders across the age-level spectrum. 

FOCUS '93 brought together approximately 1200 
leaders of children's ministries. This event focused on 
the needs of children and provided learning settings in 
which children's ministry leaders discovered new 
concepts, stretched imaginations and made 
commitments for continued ministries with children 
through congregations. 

FORUM 94 and FORUM 96 provided opportunities 
for youth ministry coordinators, directors, and leaders 
to learn about youth culture, issues related to youth 
ministry, and resources available for the support of 
ministry with youth. FAYM (Forum on Adults in Youth 
Ministry), an affiliate of the General Board of 
Discipleship born during the last quadrennium at 
FORUM 92, grew and expanded during this 
quadrennium. This affiliate group extends the efforts of 
the Board's youth ministry. 

Four thousand youth and adult workers with youth 
participated in Youth '95. This event, "Building Up the 
People of God: Let's Rock," celebrated ministry with 
youth, supported the faith formation of youth and adult 
workers with youth, and encouraged leaders and youth 
to participate in community ministries, to learn about 
youth issues and concerns, and to make commitments 
to strengthen youth ministry in congregations. 



212 



DCA Advance Edition 



TTie National Meeting of Leaders of Single Adults 
in 1994 and 1996 brought together hundreds of leaders 
of single adults to discover effective processes for 
ministry with divorced, widowed, and always single 
adults. This quadrennium witnessed the birth of 
UMSAL, United Methodist Single Adult Leaders. This 
organization extends the efforts of staff in the area of 
ministry with United Methodist single adult ministry 
leaders. 

The Consultation on Older Adult Ministries 
gathered annually to address the needs and concerns of 
ministry with persons over 65 years of age. Supported 
by the Committee on Older Adult Ministries, these 
important events provided practical learning for those 
who seek to support the faith formation of older adults 
through the ministries of the congregation. 

The National Camp and Retreat Committee, an 
affiliate organization of the General Board of 
Discipleship, cosponsored the United Methodist 
Camping/Retreat Leaders' Meeting. These meetings in 
1993 and 1995 enhanced the ministries of camping and 
retreat ministry leaders. Camping leaders received 
resources on risk management in camping and retreat 
ministries. The staff and the National Camp and Retreat 
Committee continued work to plan for the major gift for 
camping. This network of camp and retreat leaders 
continues to grow annually. 

Young adult ministry leaders explored possibilities 
for ministry with Persons bom between 1961 and 1981 
at Generation X training events across the United States. 
These events introduced new videotapes and training 
guides, Generation X Manual and Workbook. 

In addition to resources and training events, staff 
expanded and renewed vital ministries in the areas of 
Celebrating Marriage and Laboratory Training Schools. 
Materials, course books, manuals, and other supporting 
materials were redesigned, and the networks of these 
leaders were supported. 

Covenant Discipleship and Christian 
Formation 

TTie General Conference has directed the Board "to 
interpret the basics of Christian living in accordance 
with the general rule of discipleship: To witness to Jesus 
Christ in the world and to follow his teachings through 
acts of compassion, faith-sharing, justice, worship and 
devotion, under the guidance of the Holy Spirit" (^ 
1218.1). 

When congregations focus on Christian formation 
and discipleship, they find Jesus Christ at the center of 
their life and work. They find themselves becoming 
what Christ intended them to be: signs of the coming 
reign of God. Christian formation does not take place 
without committed leaders in discipleship-people who 
know what it means to waUc with Christ in the world and 
who can show others the way. These leaders must be 



identified and supported for leadership in the 
congregation. The ministries of Covenant Discipleship 
and Christian Formation support that identification and 
training of leaders through the formation of covenant 
discipleship groups and class leaders. 

Work teams for small groups and teaching ministry 
administrators are responsible for Covenant 
Discipleship and Christian Formation ministries. TTiis 
significant ministry for developing accountable disciples 
continued to grow in size during 1993-96 and is now 
found in six countries. During the quadrennium, staff 
have maintained several avenues for supporting the 
development of covenant discipleship and class leaders. 
These include: 

Networks for covenant discipleship leaders now 
include seven United Methodist seminaries and Divinity 
schools, prison ministries, urban ministries, campus 
ministries, youth Branch groups, and children's Sprouts 
groups. All of these networks meet in various ways, but 
all focus on acts of compassion, devotion, worship, and 
justice. 

Every two years Wesley Seminary and the General 
Board of Discipleship offer a Class Leader Institute for 
teams from congregations who want to implement class 
leader ministries. 

In 1996 a Class Leaders training event began at 
Scarritt-Bennett Center. This event provides hands-on, 
skill development training for class leaders. 

Contact Teaching Congregations serve as models 
for other churches. Through their example, they 
demonstrate the power of ministry found in covenant 
discipleship groups. 

The basic resources for Covenant Discipleship and 
Class Leaders have been reprinted. In addition to these 
continuing basic guides, two additional resources were 
produced. Fancy Footwork: Discipleship Wesleyan Style, 
a two part videotape, enriches the viewers' 
understanding of Covenant Discipleship and invites 
people to participate in this vital ministry of committed 
Christians. Sprouts: Nurturing Children Through 
Covenant Discipleship provides children's ministry 
leaders with basic information about Covenant 
Discipleship and guidance for adapting the covenant 
discipleship model for use with children. 

Continuing in production, the Covenant Discipleship 
Quarterly has expanded its subscription base to 642. 
This newsletter provides information and support to 
hundreds of covenant discipleship group members and 
class leaders. Staff are exploring ways to resource 
Spanish-speaking persons and congregations within the 
United States and abroad. 

Ethnic Local Church Concerns 

The General Conference has given the General 
Board of Discipleship responsibility "to ensure that 



Discipleship 



213 



ethnic local church concerns shall be an integral part of 
the total life of the board, providing guidance, 
resourcing and training so that these concerns are 
incorporated in all areas of discipleship in the local 
church" (^ 1202.12). 

Ethnic Local Church Concerns are addressed by a 
number of work teams, including the Ethnic Church 
Resource and Training Team. This team provides a 
coordinated effort of consultation and training that is 
tied to key needs of racial ethnic churches and 
communities. Consultation at the grass roots level 
provides key information in order for staff to build 
appropriate training activities. Follow-up evaluation of 
training identifies additional concerns that need to be 
addressed. As a result, specific resources needed in 
racial ethnic communities and churches can be 
provided. 

In addition, staff related to the Ethnic Church 
Resource and Training program have supported the 
implementation of ethnic writers conferences for 
training of African American, Hispanic, Native 
American, and Asian American writers. These writers 
conferences have produced effective racial ethnic 
writers who are currently working on a variety of 
resource development projects. 

The staff work with the Ethnic Lx)cal Church 
Concerns committee of the Board to provide for the 
funding of projects in ethnic minority churches and 
groups. 

The staff provide consultation and training services 
to ethnic church leaders in congregations, annual 
conferences and jurisdictions. These training services 
focus on basic areas of ministry training, including job 
training for various elected positions in congregations. 
United Methodist Church structure and support for 



leaders who are seeking to improve the functioning of 
congregational systems. 

Resources developed for ethnic local church 
concerns include materials that support the National 
Hispanic Plan. (See the description of the Board's 
response to General Conference recommendations 
toward the end of this report.) Christian Education in 
the African-American Church supports teaching and 
learning ministries in African American churches. New 
resources that address ministry concerns of youth and 
adults include specific sections which support ministry 
with racial ethnic youth, single adults, and older adults. 

Family Ministries 

The General Board of Discipleship has been given 
responsibility by the General Conference "to encourage 
and resource programs in local churches addressed to 
the differing needs and aspirations of... families as 
centers for the formation of spiritual growth, values, and 
vocation consistent with Christian teaching and 
practice" (^ 1219.2a). 

A work team on family ministries addresses the 
varying needs of families in today's society. During this 
quadrennium, this team has developed strategies for 
ministry with families through the development of 
networks of family ministry leaders. A Consultation on 
Ministries with Families generated research 
information and identified resources needed within the 
family ministries network. The consultation was well 
received, and participants indicated interest in future 
consultations. 

Two resources were developed: Family Matters, a 
resource designed for family ministry planners, 
addresses basic planning concerns for those developing 



Breakdown of Ethnic Local Church Proposals Funded to Date 



Ethnic Group 


Total Funded 


Percent 


Total Money 


Percent 


African American 


18 


40% 


$183,655.00 


45% 


Asian American 


10 


22% 


$ 54,300.00 


13% 


Hispanic American 


8 


18% 


$ 73,500.00 


19% 


Native American 


9 


20% 


$ 71,920.00 


18% 


Pacific Islanders 





0% 





0% 


l^ulti Ethnic 


1 


0% 


$ 20,000.00 


5% 


Total 


46 


100% 


$403,375.00 


100% 




Total 


Percent 


Total 


Percent 


Local Church 


18 


40% 


$139,695.00 


35% 


District 


5 


12% 


$ 12,180.00 


03% 


Annual Conference 


9 


20% 


$ 63,000.00 


16% 


Jurisdiction 


1 


.05% 


$ 3,500.00 


.01% 


Caucus 


12 


27% 


$165,000.00 


41% 


General Agency 





0% 





0% 


National 


1 


.05% 


$ 15,000.00 


.04% 


Other 





0% 





0% 


Total 


46 


100% 


$403,375.00 


100% 



214 



DCA Advance Edition 



family ministry efforts. Claiming Our Time with God and 
Each Other provides devotional resources for families 
and for family ministry leaders. Staff participated with 
the Committee on Family Ministries to provide 
resources for National Family Week. 

Family Ministries Leadership Training Lab was 
held in 1995. This gathering of family ministries leaders 
focused on establishing and equipping a core of leaders 
to assist congregation, church clusters, districts, and 
annual conferences in building systems for ministries 
with families. The training included lectures, Bible 
study, and a variety of seminars. Participants created an 
action plan for family ministries in their particular 
congregation, district, or annual conference. Potential 
resources for family ministry leaders were tested during 
the event. These resources will be produced as they are 
refined and revised. 

Ministry of the Laity 

At the direction of the General Conference, the 
General Board of Discipleship "shall interpret and 
spread through the Church all the rich meanings of the 
universal priesthood of believers, of Christian vocation, 
and of the ministry of the laity" and shall be responsible 
for "training and enabling the laos-the whole body of its 
membership-to enter into mission and to minister and 
•witness in the name of Jesus Christ, the Head of the 
Church" (11216). 

Work teams on leadership in the church, 
community outreach ministries, and small groups 
provide resources and support for the ministry of the 
laity. The leadership team has identified a critical need 
for partnership between laity and clergy in the 
congregation. A pilot project. Partners in Ministry, was 
introduced in 1995. The learnings from that pilot are 
resulting in new resources that address laity and clergy 
partnership for ministry. 

Key to the efforts of this project are the roles of the 
lay leader and the pastor who form a partnership to 
undergird the ministry of the congregation. Specific 
attention to helping congregations identify a vision for 
ministry that supports the primary task of the 
congregation forms the central core of these resources. 
In addition, these resources address the development of 
interpersonal relationships and leadership skills. 

The National Association of Annual Conference Lay 
Leaders, an affiliate of the General Board of 
Discipleship, meets annually to work with staff in 
developing specific resources and support for 
congregational lay leaders and pastor/laity teams. This 
group worked with staff to design and implement the 
development of the laity address to the General 
Conference in 1996. This address, "Partners in 
Ministry," also supports the work of this team in 
resourcing laity leaders. 



In 1995 one hundred persons attended a national 
conference on lay speaking, the largest such event since 
its inception. 

During the quadrennium staff also supervised the 
revision of most of the lay speaking materials. 

LINKS, a newsletter for conference and district lay 
leaders and other key leaders in laity ministries, 
continues to be mailed three times a year. 

The basic set of resources for leaders in the 
congregation, Guidelines for Leading Your Church, were 
redesigned for the next quadrennium. The General 
Board of Discipleship has responsibility for the 
development of 22 of the 32 resources in this series. 

In addition to the ongoing work of providing 
resources for elected leaders in congregations, the staff 
developed strategies for emphasizing the ministry of the 
Laity for the next quadrennium, 1997-2000. 

The community outreach team provides resources 
and training related to ministry in daily life. Work 
focuses on support for people who seek to be in ministry 
in their homes, schools, work places and communities. 
Specific work this quadrennium has focused on working 
with interagency committees to develop resources for 
prison ministries and for AIDS/HIV ministries. Work 
with the peace advocate leaders was supported by 
articles in LINKS and in conversations with this network 
of leaders. 

In cooperation with the General Board of Global 
Ministries, the small groups work team has provided 
annual training for leaders of mission education with 
children. In 1995 this training included a consultation 
with annual conference leadership interested in 
building systems for mission education as a way to 
connect faith with daily life. It also included specific help 
for leaders of mission education with youth. 
Participation in this event doubled that of previous 
years. Staff also participate in the development of 
mission education resources for persons of all ages. 

United Methodist Men 

At the direction of the General Conference, the 
General Board of Discipleship has been given the 
following responsibilities related to United Methodist 
Men: 

'To provide resources and support services to foster 
the development of units of United Methodist Men" d 
1223.1); and 

'To seek methods for involving men in a growing 
relationship to the Lord Jesus Christ and his Church" d 
1223.2). 

The work of United Methodist Men continues to 
expand as ministry with men has become a growing 
movement in our culture. The number of chartered 



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215 



United Methodist Men's groups increased from 9,203 in 
1992 to more than 10,000 in 1995. 

Through Evangelism, Mission and Spiritual Life 
(EMS) gifts, United Methodist Men contributed more 
than $400,000.00 during the quadrennium. These funds 
support men's ministries on the district, conference, 
jurisdictional, and national levels. 

Currently, there are 1300 Life Members enrolled. 
Funds are deposited with the United Methodist Men's 
Foundation. Some of the funds from this program are 
used in international United Methodist Men's work to 
provide scholarships for racial ethnic and Central 
Conference or international persons to participate in 
United Methodist Men's events. 

Continued support for United Methodist Men's 
ministries in Jamaica has occurred throughout the 
quadrennium. In 1995 a delegation from the Jamaican 
men's organization attended the National Association of 
Conference Presidents meeting. 

The development of ministry with racial ethnic men 
continues to expand. The International Congress for 
Men included specific attention to ministry with racial 
ethnic men. Two "Black Men in Crisis" conferences 
were held during the quadrennium. More than 400 
Black men participated in each of these conferences. 
Varieties of resources have emerged from these 
conferences, including videotapes and articles in 
MENSNEWS. 

The International Congress for United Methodist 
Men was held in July, 1993. Approximately 4500 men 
participated in this exciting Congress. The men's fair, 
an exhibition of resources and examples of ministry with 
men, was an outstanding success. The next 
International Congress will be held July 10-13, 1997 at 
Purdue University in West Lafayette, Indiana. 

Resources to support ministry with men include 
MENSNEWS, which is mailed to 29,000 pastors and 
other leaders of congregational minisfries with men. 
This important news journal contains information about 
men's ministries from across the denomination, 
provides suggestions for expanding the effectiveness of 
ministry with men, includes information about scouting 
ministries, and celebrates the ministry of United 
Methodist Men. The annual Program Book provides 
resources for United Methodist Men's units. The 
recendy published resource,/! Transforming Journey for 
Men, encourages men to follow the image of Christ in 
order to be empowered for God's service. 

The Moving Member Program provides a toll-free 
telephone service to churches who want to help in the 
relocation of members who move. This service of United 
Methodist Men assists pastors and church members in 
making contact with people as they move to new 
communities. 



Staff continue to provide consultation services and 
learning opportunities to varieties of leaders in the 
United Methodist Men's movement. These services 
include: 

Staff provide fraining support and information to 
leaders in the United Methodist Men's ministry at a 
variety of men's refreats and conferences. 

Conference presidents meet annually as part of the 
National Association of Conference Presidents meeting. 
This affiliate group of the Board provides effective 
networking services between annual conference 
presidents. 

Twice a year disfrict United Methodist Men's 
presidents gather to learn about United Methodist 
Men's ministries and to strengthen the network of 
leaders of men's ministries at the district level. 

The United Methodist Men's Foundation, an 
affiliate organization of the Board, provides effective 
monetary support for a variety of men 's ministry efforts, 
including the funding of the Office of Civic Youth- 
Serving Agencies/Scouting beginning in 1996. 

The staff of United Methodist Men work with the 
Upper Room to provide financial support for the Prayer 
Ministry toll-free phone line. In addition. United 
Methodist Men supports men who are prayer advocates 
in their annual conferences and churches. 

The Office of Civic Youth-Serving Agencies/ 
Scouting continues to expand its efforts to build effective 
programs for children and youth. The packet. Civic 
Youth-Serving Agencies/Scouting, has been expanded 
in order to support leaders who wish to develop or 
expand Boy Scout, Girl Scout, Camp Fire Boys and 
Girls, and 4-H groups within churches and 
communities. Currendy, 1.25 million children and youth 
are served by the churches involved in this ministry of 
scouting and other civic youth serving agencies. The 
National Association of United Methodist Scouters, an 
affiliate organization of the Board, continues to provide 
an effective support to the work of this office. 

Adult recognition is very popular and important to 
the continued growth of scouting ministry in the 
communities served by our churches. About 400 Cross 
and Flame or Torch awards are presented each year to 
adult leaders. The Bishop's Award of Excellence is 
awarded to a froop, pack, or Explorer group that has met 
certain requirements. All these awards continue to 
support scouting ministries in communities and 
congregations. These awards provide an important 
connection between scouting ministries and The United 
Methodist Church. 

Congregational Leadership 

As the members and staff of the General Board of 
Discipleship have clarified and sharpened the vision, 
mission, and core processes of the Board, they have 



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established a new set of working relationships for the 
staff. The focus is on serving the needs of a particular 
set of persons in the denomination. The staff related to 
Congregational Leadership issues have focused on the 
resource needs of pastors of local congregations and 
designated leaders in the annual conferences, especially 
the district superintendents and bishops. The staff also 
serve the specific needs of designated leaders in the 
subject areas of evangelism, stewardship, and worship. 

The Congregational Leadership staff is working on 
its new and additional focus of providing resources 
related to the spiritual and visioning leadership role of 
the pastor in the local congregation. In part this involves 
ascertaining the spiritual, professional, and 
improvement knowledge that pastors need to be 
effective leaders of Christian communities. Major 
attention has been given to seven critical issues for 
effective leadership: 

1. the pastor as a spiritual leader; 

2. the pastor as the leader who expresses the vision 
for the congregation; 

3. the pastor as one who enhances the ministry of 
lay persons; 

4. the pastor as one who embodies the essential 
characteristics of a leader; 

5. the pastor as one who is engaged in continuous 
growth in professional and improvement knowledge; 

6. the pastor as one who is seeking a deeper 
understanding of his/her gifts for and creativity in 
ministry. 

7. the pastor as one who embodies integrity in all 
aspects of personal and professional life. 

Increased attention to these issues has further 
enhanced the work that the Board has been doing in its 
traditional subject areas. 

Evangelism 

The General Conference has given the Board the 
responsibility "to set forth an adequate biblical and 
theological basis and understanding for the personal, 
corporate, and social aspects of evangelism, consistent 
with the doctrine and tradition of The United Methodist 
Church, and to communicate and interpret the same to 
the membership of the Church" (^ 1212.1). The Board 
has sought to make as full a response as possible 
through a careful husbanding of its personnel and 
financial resources. 

The evangelism focus of the Board is on sharing the 
love of God and the Good News of salvation in Jesus 
Christ in the hope of helping individuals come to a new 
or renewed commitment to Christ and to become 
disciples of Christ in the fullest sense. 



The evangelism staff works with leaders in 
congregations, districts, and annual conferences in 
building knowledge and providing resources for a 
comprehensive plan of evangelism ministries. In the 
1993-1996 quadrennium, staff have developed resources 
and information and provided training and consultations 
to shape and support evangelism strategies, especially 
for local congregations. The following is a short 
synopsis of some of the work of the Board in evangelism 
this quadrennium. 

1. Vision 2000. This has been a centerpiece of 
evangelism ministries for the 1993-1996 quadrennium. 
Vision 2000 has been designed to call every United 
Methodist congregation to envision its future so that by 
the year 2000, congregations will be vital, caring, 
sharing, redemptive fellowships in ministry and will 
have a major emphasis on outreach and evangelism. 
Over 100,000 persons have attended major beginning 
conference-wide meetings Oaunch events) in 40 annual 
conferences. Vision 2000 includes several basic 
elements: a launch event, training events, worship 
attendance crusades and clergy seminars. 

Two key resources have been developed to support 
Vision 2000: 

Vision 2000-Planning for Ministry into the Next 
Century by Joe Harding and Ralph W. Mohney. In 1996 
editions of this book were published in Spanish and 
Korean. 

Vision 2000: Worship Attendance Crusade Guidehy 
Joe Harding. 

2. Offering Christ Today S chools of Evangelism. 
Since their inception in 1986, forty-five Offering Christ 
Today Schools of Evangelism have been held. In the 
present quadrennium these schools were redesigned 
and updated. The schools offer training in evangelism 
skills around the congregation's primary task of 
reaching out and receiving persons, relating them to 
God, nurturing them in the faith, and sending them out 
as disciples. The schools focus on the context for 
evangelism, hospitality, faith-sharing, initiation, prayer, 
invitational preaching, vision, and leadership. These 
three to five day schools are sponsored jointly by an 
annual conference, the Board, and the Foundation for 
Evangelism (which provides a grant to the Board to 
assist in underwriting the costs of the Schools of 
Evangelism) . 

In addition to the regular Schools of Evangelism, in 
the present quadrennium the staff has participated in 
the development and staffing of a School of Evangelism 
for Native Americans and two Schools of Evangelism for 
Koreans. 

3. Offering Christ TODAY. During the past 
quadrennium, the staff began publishing "Offering 
Christ TODAY," a newsletter which is sent without 
charge to every pastor and diaconal minister under 
appointment. "Offering Christ TO DAY," which has been 



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217 



well received, has become the voice for the 
Congregational Leadership staff, offering articles on 
leadership in evangelism, stewardship, and worship. 

4. Faith-Sharing and Witnessing. The book, 
Faith-Sharing, by George E. Morris and H. Eddie Fox 
has been revised, and a new model for training in 
jurisdictions, conferences and local churches has been 
developed. This also includes a "Faith-Sharing New 
Testament". Training began in 1996 in cooperation with 
the World Evangelism Committee of the World 
Methodist Council. A process for helping local churches 
to become faith-sharing congregations has been 
developed, and training for leadership using this model 
has been done. A new resource, Tlie Faith-Sharing 
Congregation, by Roger K. Swanson and Shirley F. 
Clement supports this emphasis. 

Related to the above. Sang E. Chun developed a new 
design for Personal Evangelism Training for local 
churches. This is available in English and Korean. 

5. Lav Witness Mission. The Lay Witness Mission 
is a strategy for evangelism that encourages lay persons 
to share their faith journeys with others. It has been a 
model for developing small groups, encouraging 
faith-sharing and witnessing, developing new 
leadership, and reaching out to unchurched and inactive 
persons. Throughout each year of the quadrennium 
there have been about 400 Lay Involvement Weekends. 
In this quadrennium new resources were developed to 
support this activity. These include The Lay Witness 
Mission Handbook (revised). Come and See (a study 
booklet), Youth and the Lay Witness Mission, Leader's 
Guide for Children's Sessions, Pastor's and Local Church 
Chairperson's Packet, and Hints for Witnesses. 

In 1995 the Christian Methodist Episcopal Church 
invited the staff to work with them to develop leadership 
for the Lay Witness Mission in their denomination. 
Training sessions have been held, and the staff is 
working with the CME Church leadership to develop a 
plan for implementation, for mentoring relationships 
and for sharing resources. 

6. New Life Mission and Kev Event Celebration. 
The New Life Mission is a contemporary strategy for 
evangelism that is designed to awaken faith in people 
and to mobilize local congregations in ministries of 
witness and mission. The Key Event Celebration is also 
a model designed for the local church to enable church 
members to become disciples. It focuses on celebrating 
the historic faith and then sharing this faith with others. 
Both of these models involve extended study, prayer 
and preparation in the local congregation. They also 
involve preaching clinics and leadership training for 
pastors. Both of these emphases have an extended 
history with the Board. Leadership training resources 
were revised, and other resource revisions will be 
completed by the end of this quadrennium. 

7. New World Mission. This is a person-to-person 
ministry available to congregations in alternate years. It 



brings Christian leaders and teachers from around the 
world to preach and teach in about 75 communities in 
the United States. This quadrennium the New World 
Mission took place in 1994 and 1996, during which more 
than 50 Christian leaders were invited to be missioners 
in our midst. They were in more than 150 communities 
and ministered to churches with memberships ranging 
from 150-3000. They were hosted by individual 
churches, clusters of churches, and disfricts. People 
re-examined their own discipleship, new leaders were 
developed, new and renewed commitments to Christ 
and ministry were made, and people gained a new 
understanding of our oneness in Christ. The New World 
Mission Handbook has been revised, and a new study 
booklet. In the Meantime, has been developed. 

8. New Congregational Development The staff 
have offered assistance to annual conferences, disfricts, 
and local churches in planning new churches. 

In cooperation with the General Board of Global 
Ministries, three specific fraining events were offered 
several times throughout the quadrennium. One series 
of fraining events focused on fraining for pastors and 
spouses involved in the first year of a new church 
development. Training was also given for pastors and 
spouses who are in the third through sbrth years of a 
new church development. In addition, a School for 
Congregational Development has been offered annually 
for pastors, conference leaders, and disfrict 
superintendents who are involved in new church starts, 
"restarts," and congregational revitalization and 
fransformations. 

9. New Print Resources. In addition to resources 
afready mentioned, the following were developed in the 
present quadrennium: 

Collaborating in Ministry by Herb Mather and 
Terrence Hayes 

Contemporary Worship in the 21st Century: Worship 
or Evangelism? by Craig Kennet Miller and Dan 
Benedict 

Culture Shift by Craig Kennet Miller and Lia 
Icaza-WiUetts 

Evangelism for a New Century by Bishop Earl G. 
Hunt 

Congregational Evangelism by Maxie Dunnam 

Tried and True by John Ed Mathison 

Growing New Churches by Stephen Compton and G. 
Steven Sallee 

Encounters unth Jesus by Craig Kennet Miller 

The staff have also been heavily involved in 
developing resources for the National Hispanic Plan. 



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Stewardship 

Two of the specific responsibilities given by the 
General Conference to the Board relating to 
stewardship are: 

'To interpret the biblical and theological basis for 
stewardship through programs, resources, and training 
materials consistent with the doctrines of The United 
Methodist Church" (^ 1214.1); and 

'To create within The United Methodist Church a 
deepening commitment to personal and corporate 
Christian stewardship which includes the use and 
sharing of talents and resources, and the practice of a 
Christian life-style" («|I 1214.3). 

Christian stewardship is more than money, but it is 
not less than money. The stewardship staff assists local 
congregations, districts, and annual conferences as they 
help persons grow as stewards of their relationships, 
their own selves and their possessions. In stewardship 
the Board offers resources, consultation, and programs 
to encourage the practice of whole-life stewardship as a 
spiritual discipline. 

1. Consultation with Con ference Stewardship 
Leaders. The staff has been involved in numerous 
consultations with elected (or appointed) stewardship 
leaders with annual conferences and other key 
members of the conference leadership team. These 
consultations have focused on assisting in the design 
and development of a multi-year strategy for the 
transformation of congregations and individuals 
through the window of stewardship. The consultations 
are designed to help conference leaders share their own 
plan for meeting the needs and lifting the vision for 
stewardship in the local churches. "Stewardship 
Specialist" training is designed to equip persons to 
consult with congregations around issues of financial 
stewardship. 

2. Stewardship Training Qnnortimities. Several 
seminar and training programs have been developed 
and are being widely called upon for stewardship 
training. These seminars are held on a district, annual 
conference or regional basis. They include the 
following: 

a. "Putting God First: The Tithe: A Seminar for 
Risky Christian Stewards" is a one-day event designed 
to train and motivate people to lead tithing studies in 
congregations. 

b. In "Christians and Money" participants explore 
the Christian values in money management, identify and 
begin to control the power money has in their lives, and 
build new values in money management consistent with 
their Christian values. 

c. "Giving and the Local Congregation" is a seminar 
that focuses on new ways for a congregation to expand 
its financial base. 



d. "Gifts Discovery Training" has as its purpose the 
training of a group of persons within an annual 
conference to lead "Gifts Discovery Workshops" in local 
churches and to help congregations build gift-based 
volunteer ministries. 

e. "Year-Round Stewardship" emphasizes the faith 
foundations and practical means for implementing a 
year-round stewardship plan in the congregation. 
Teams from congregations create a year-round 
stewardship formation plan for their congregation 
during this three-day seminar. 

f. "Growing in Faithfulness" is a proclamation event 
for the local congregation. It is designed to call persons 
to greater faithfulness as Christian stewards. A visiting 
"Preaching Steward" delivers five stewardship sermons 
and leads workshops and seminars during the four-day 
mission. 

3. Maior Training Events. The stewardship staff, 
along with a group of twelve Stewardship Associates 
(Adjunct Staff), has provided throughout the 
quadrennium a number of significant training events 
focused on the wide range of stewardship topics. These 
include: 

a. "Planned Giving School: A Cutting Edge Fund 
Development Conference" was offered in 1994 and 1996. 
This is an intensive five-day course that is a 
Christian-oriented training in the specialized field of 
planned giving. 

b. "Convocation on Development" was offered in 
1993 and 1995. These convocations offered a wide range 
of workshops that provide practical help in the area of 
planned giving for lay persons at all levels of interest and 
experience. 

c. "Stewardship University" is designed for persons 
who want to be more effective stewardship leaders 
within their congregations. Avariety of classes about the 
practical aspects of stewardship leadership are 
presented. This was offered in 1993 and 1995. 

4. Stewardship in Ethnic Congregations. This 
quadrennium the staff has been deeply involved in 
developing resources for the National Hispanic Plan, 
providing considerable training and consultation with 
African-American congregations, and working with the 
Oklahoma Indian Missionary Conference. 

5. "Celebrate Stewardship". This is a one-sheet 
practical article on some aspect of stewardship that is 
distributed quarterly to forty subscribing annual 
conferences. These conferences have the full right to 
reproduce and distribute the article as is most 
appropriate to each annual conference. 

6. New Print Resources. During the present 
quadrennium the stewardship staff has produced 
several print resources for use by congregations and 
individuals. These include: 



Discipleship 



219 



Choices and Challenges by Dan Dick 

Stories for Sharing by Susan Patterson-Sumwalt 

Money Isn't/Is Everything by Herb Miller 

One on One Stewardship by Dan Dick 

Preaching for Giving by Timothy Bagwell 

Right On The Money by Brian Bauknight 

More Money, New Money, Big Money by Wayne 
Barrett 

Abingdon Guide to Church Funding (Volume 1) by 
Donald W. Joiner and Norma Wimberly 

Abingdon Guide to Church Funding (Volume 2) by 
Donald W. Joiner and Norma Wimberly 

Don 't Shoot the Horse (Til You Know How To Drive 
the Tractor) by Herbert Mather 

The staff have been engaged also in the 
development of resources for the National Hispanic 
Plan. 

Also produced were a set of audio tapes of a series 
of lectures on stewardship by M. Douglas Meeks and a 
video of a lecture on "The Giving Cycle" by Thomas C. 
Rieke. 

Worship 

A central responsibility that the General 
Conference has assigned to the Board relates to 
worship. The Board is "to cultivate the fullest possible 
meaning in the corporate worship celebrations of the 
Church to the glory of God, including liturgy, preaching, 
the Sacraments, music, and related arts. (It) shall 
encourage observance of the seasons of the Christian 
year, emphasizing the surprising and inspirational 
opportunities for glorifying God everywhere in creation 
in a profusion of variety" (^ 1213.1). 

The worship staff offers information, interpretation, 
and ongoing consultation to help pastors and worship 
leaders use the full range of worship and preaching 
resources. In the past two quadrennia the Board has 
been extremely involved in the development and 
publication of TTie United Methodist Hymnal and The 
United Methodist Book of Worship, as well as many other 
resources. 

1. The United Me thodist Book ofWorshit. The 1992 
General Conference adopted The United Methodist Book 
of Worship. Published in 1992, it was enthusiastically 
received by pastors and worship leaders. Over 68,000 
copies have been sold, including more than 47,000 
copies of the hardback edition, 14,500 copies of the 
Pastor's Pocket Edition, and 6,200 copies of the 
accompanisf s edition. 



The success of the publication led to a major 
demand for training in the use of the resource. A 
national workshop for pastors, musicians, and other 
worship leaders was held early in the quadrennium. 
Subsequently, training events were held in annual 
conferences and districts. The worship staff continues 
to conduct training and consultations on this significant 
resource. 

2. Contemporarv Worship. What began as a wave of 
requests for information and resources related to 
contemporary worship developed into a major work 
emphasis for the worship staff. An initial bibliography of 
two pages listing books and resources grew into a larger 
effort. Contemporary Worship for the 21st Century: 
Worship or Evangelism? was written by two staff 
members, Daniel Benedict, and Craig Kennet Miller. 
This resource asserts that contemporary worship is one 
key to evangelical ministry through the church. 

Interest in both the topic and the book resulted in 
the development of jurisdictional workshops on 
contemporary worship. The staff also worked with some 
of the Offering Christ Today Schools of Evangelism in 
presenting the issues and possibilities of contemporary 
worship as a part of an outreach ministry for 
congregations. Future resources in contemporary 
music are now in the development stage. 

3. Resources in Preaching. The staff also focused on 
the need for resourcing congregational leaders for vital 
and transforming worship. The staff has placed a major 
emphasis on excellence in preaching and consultations 
with annual conferences in preaching and worship. In 
an effort to reach more pastors on the subject of 
preaching, the Academy for Preaching evolved from a 
national training event to annual consultations to 
support their work and programs in preaching. In 
cooperation with United Methodist Communications, a 
video tape series entitled "Staying Alive in the Pulpit" 
was developed. (This is available through EcuFilm.) A 
second series will be completed in 1996. 

In addition a new resource by Barbara Bate, 
Freedom in the Pulpit, is to be published in 1996. 

4. Christian Initiation. A series of resources on the 
topic of Christian initiation is under development. These 
resources are designed to help pastors and 
congregations to improve the essential ministries (the 
primary task) of the congregation by offering to 
accompany seekers on a journey of conversion leading 
to baptism and to faithful ministry in daily life. These 
resources are currently in the testing phases, with 
publication scheduled for 1998. 

5. Spanish Language Hvmnal. The staff have been 
actively and directly involved in the development of Mil 
Voces Para Celebrar, a Spanish language hymnal. This 
is to be submitted to the 1996 General Conference for 
adoption. Plans are being made for promoting the use 
of this resource. 



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6. Cooperative Worship Planning. In 1992, The Book 
of Discipline was revised to provide for the local church 
work area chairperson's participation in cooperative 
worship planning with the pastor and other worship 
leaders (^262. 11a). 

During the quadrennium, the staff has extensively 
promoted the process of team worship planning. Pastors 
were encouraged to convene worship committees as 
planning teams in order to create transforming and vital 
worship and to allow for improvement in worship 
through this group process. Staff members have 
encouraged cooperative planning of worship through 
seminars, written resources, and interpreting TTie 
United Methodist Hymnal and The United Methodist 
Book of Worship as creative tools for worship. 

7. Other Resources. In addition to the major 
resources cited above, the worship staff have written 
widely in the Church and the professional journals 
related to worship, preaching, and music. Staff have also 
prepared small resource sheets that are circulated in 
response to specific needs or inquiries. The staff 
respond to many mail and telephone inquiries for 
specific resources. They have been directly involved in 
the development of resources for the National Hispanic 
Plan. 

Quality Improvement OfBce 

The Quality Improvement Office of the General 
Board of Discipleship was formed in 1993 to support the 
board's "Quest for Quality." Quest for Quality is the 
General Board of Discipleship's effort to assist 
congregations, annual conferences, and other 
Church-related organizations to build, rebuild, and 
improve their systems to deliver quality ministry. 

Quest for Quality seminars, coordinated by the 
Quality Improvement Office, focus on such concepts as: 

•Systems thinking; 

•Mission and vision; 

•listening to those we serve in the church and 
community; 

•The primary task of the local congregation and the 
annual conference; and 

•The vital role of spiritual leaders in transforming 
the church. 

Quest for Quality seminars call for Church leaders 
to move away from a focus on institutions to a focus on 
the transformation of people and the world. As a result, 
all across the Church, leaders are reaffirming the 
primary task of the local congregation (reaching out to 
people, receiving them in love, relating them to God, 
nurturing them in the faith, and sending them out into 
the world) and the primary task of the annual 
conference (providing leadership for congregations). 



Operating out of its mission to build knowledge for 
quality improvement at the General Board of 
Discipleship, in annual conferences, and in 
congregations, the Quality Improvement Office has 
provided the introductory Quest for Quality course- "A 
New Way of Thinking"-in more than thirty annual 
conferences. Many of those conferences have sought 
additional training through follow-up courses offered by 
the staff. 

In addition to conference-based seminars, the 
Quality Improvement Office annually offers two Quest 
for Quality events that are open to all interested persons. 
General Board of Discipleship staff have also benefited 
from the services provided by the Quality Improvement 
Office. As of fall 1994, ninety percent of the staff had 
received training in the basic Quest for Quality course. 
Some seventy percent had received additional training. 

Leadership for the Quest for Quality seminars was 
enhanced by a fall 1995 training event for persons to lead 
"A New Way of Thinking." 

Leadership and change was the focus of an eventfor 
bishops of The United Methodist Church in January 
1996. Sponsored by the Quality Improvement Office, the 
event featured nationally known leadership experts 
Margaret Wheatley, Peter Block, and John Covington. 
Worship services, an integral part of the event, were 
coordinated by Bishop Reuben Job and the Rev. Carmen 
Gaud. 

Resources produced by the Quality Improvement 
Office include two training notebooks: 

"Quest for Quality: A New Way of Thinking" 

"Quest for Quality: Strategies and Skills." 

In 1993, Discipleship Resources published Quest for 
Quality in the Church: A New Paradigm by Ezra Earl 
Jones. The Quality Improvement Office produces the 
Board's monthly newsletter, Discipleship Dateline, 
which features information about Quest for Quality as 
well as information about programs and resources of the 
General Board of Discipleship. Included each month 
with Discipleship Dateline is Ezra Earl Jones's 
thought-provoldng Perspective. 

Resources currently in production include two 
videos: Quest for Quality: A New Way of Thinking and 
Listening to the Customer. Scheduled for release in 1996 
is Think About It by Ezra Earl Jones. Staff are also 
planning a Spanish-language version of Quest for Quality 
in the Church: A New Paradigm. 

Staff of the Quality Improvement Office will 
continue to provide education and resources in quality 
improvement, systems theory, and other disciplines that 
will help the church become a learning organization. 



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221 



Church School PubUcations 

The Department of Church School Publications of 
the General Board of Discipleship has as its primary 
function providing the local congregations of United 
Methodism with educational and fellowship resources 
that will assist persons in their growth as Christian 
disciples through formal educational and fellowship 
opportunities. 

The Curriculum Resources Committee, organized 
and administered by the General Board of Discipleship, 
works with Church School Publications by carefully 
reviewing and acting "on the plans constructed and 
proposed by the staff of Church School Publications 
based upon research, including ideas from the 
Curriculum Resources Committee and other persons in 
United Methodist educational ministries" (1 1224. 1, The 
Book of Discipline) . 

In the past quadrennium, Church School 
Publications developed curriculum resources to assist 
persons of all ages in their growth as Christian disciples. 
The following list is illustrative and not exhaustive: 

New Invitation: Learning and Living God's Word, a 
Bible study for children, ages 3-12, graded on a two year 
basis. This resource covers major biblical characters 
and events in three years, and allows children to cover 
the same basic material at a deeper level as they grow 
older. It includes teacher books featuring the new 
EasyTeach format, student books, class paks, 
cassette/CD's, Assembly Time guide, and quarterly 
newsletters for pastors and parents. This new children's 
church school curriculum was developed after careful 
research, listening to users, and feedback from focus 
groups. 

Vacation Bible school resources, including Peter 
Rock: A Drama of Faith, Beneath The Storytelling Tree, 
and Turnabout Paul, have been well received and have 
aided congregations in reaching out to children in their 
communities. 

Follow Me, a new comprehensive program of 
Confirmation was developed to encourage and 
strengthen confirmation programs in local 
congregations. The resource includes a Leader's Kit 
with a video, student magazine, and a Handbook for 
congregation and parents. 

TREK and Bible Lessons for Youth are available for 
Sunday study while avariety of short-term resources are 
available for Sunday or weekday study: 

Three To The Point resources on Aids, Violence and 
Religions; 

Six Youthsearch volumes developed on the basis of 
research: Conflict, Stress and Time, Relationships, 
Death, After High School, and a start-up guide. 



Biblical Images for Today: Out of the Wilderness and 
Party: Invitation to God's Reign. 

While we have continued to produce and improve 
Adult Bible Studies, Daily Bible Study, and Scriptures for 
the Church Seasons, we have added new resources that 
take into account the different learning needs of adults 
and the different ways adults learn: 

Get Acquainted with Your Bible and Get Acquainted 
with Your Christian Faith; 

Faith Matters for Young Adults and More Faith 
Matters for Young Adults; 

Lifesearch, twelve volumes related to life issues 
confronting adults ages 25-45; 

Journey Through the Bible, sbrteen volumes, using 
the best of biblical scholarship to lead adult learners 
through the entire Bible; 

Breaking the Code, video based resource on the 
Book of Revelation; 

Challenge, sbc volumes to help adult learners 
struggle with such social issues as genetic science, 
United Nations peacekeeping efforts, and racism. 

Church School Publications continues to develop 
curriculum resources for Spanish speaking 
constituencies: Lecciones Cristianas, quarterly 
publication for adults; Lecciones Cristianas para jovenes, 
an annual publication for youth; and Aventuras, the new 
children's curriculum. In addition, Escuela Biblica de 
Vacaciones provides resources to be used in vacation 
Bible school for children ages three through grade six. 

Church School Publications produces curriculum 
resources for Korean speaking constituencies: 

Class Meeting Guide, an annual published for use 
each week in the class meeting; 

Paul series; 

Jesus Christ series; 

Genesis to Revelation series (Vols. 5-7) ; 

Handbook for Korean-American Families: 
Improving Communication. 

Church School Publications has taken initial steps 
at using the latest in electronic technologies: 

Faithlink enables adult classes to discuss within two 
weeks any major issue or concern that faces our 
congregations. It is available by FAX or CompuServe. 

Line is the youth version of Faithlink and is available 
in the same ways. 

Young Adults Online provides a variety of topics for 
discussion for campus ministers or leaders of young 
adult groups. Available by FAX or CompuServe. 



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Church School Publications recognizes tiiat we 
cannot produce the resources 

to meet every need of local congregations. 
Therefore, we have explored the development of 
partnerships with others. 

Aventuras, the new children's curriculum for 
Spanish speaking congregation, while produced by 
Church School Publications, is being done in 
cooperation with The American Baptist Church, The 
Presbyterian Church in the US, and The Disciples of 
Christ Church. 

The Whole People of God, a lectionary based 
curriculum for persons of all ages, is made available to 
local congregations in cooperation with Logos 
Productions. In addition to having editorial staff input at 
the development stage. Church School Publications 
develops Vie Denominational Handbook for United 
Methodist Churches. 

As we move towards the year 2000, Church School 
Publications is committed to developing the highest 
quality resources by listening carefully to those who 
teach and learn using our curriculum resources, by 
being faithful to the Scriptures and to the tradition 
entrusted to us, and by helping persons and 
congregations interpret the faith in ways that aid them 
in living their lives faithfully. 

Discipleship Resources 

As one of the three publishing units of the General 
Board of Discipleship, Discipleship Resources 
continues in both its ministry and business 
responsibilities. In ministry, DR has provided local 
church leaders with basic resources to build 
discipleship ministries in each congregation. These 
ministries focus on winning persons to Jesus Christ, 
developing them into full disciples and sending them 
into their communities for service. DR continues to be 
a self-supporting unit of the Board. 

Working with the program units, Discipleship 
Resources develops and produces a wide variety of 
books, booklets, and manuals for leaders and 
participants in congregational ministries. Fifteen to 
twenty new tides are added each year. Our present 
inventory includes over 180 titles. During the 
quadrennium, we have distributed almost 1.9 million 
individual products. These cover the full range of 
subject areas assigned to the General Board of 
Discipleship including Christian Education, Age-Level 
and Family Ministries, Ministry of the Laity, Covenant 
Discipleship, Ethnic Local Church Concerns, United 
Methodist Men, Evangelism, Worship, and 
Stewardship. 

Some of DR's most popular titles published for the 
program units are: 



Contemporary Worship for the 21st Century: Worship 
or Evangelism ? by Daniel T. Benedict and Craig Kennet 

Miller 

Covenant Discipleship: Christian Formation through 
Mutual Accountability by David Lowes Watson 

Don't Shoot the Horse ( Til You Know How to Drive 
the Tractor) by Herb Mather 

Faith-Sharing: Dynamic Christian Witnessing by 
Invitation by George E. Morris and H. Eddie Fox 

Foundations: Shaping the Ministry of Christian 
Education in Your Congregation 

Lay Speaking Ministry: Basic Course 1993-96 by 
Jack Gilbert and Nan Zoller 

Quest for Quality in the Church: A New Paradigm by 
Ezra Earl Jones 

United Methodist Member's Handbook by George E. 
Koehler 

UMYF Handbook 

Vision 2000: Planning for Ministry Into the Next 
Century by Joe Harding and Ralph Mohney 

In late 1992-1993, Discipleship Resources 
conducted a study and developed new approaches for 
the distribution of our resources, including order entry, 
packaging and shipping, and accounts receivable. DR 
discovered new cost-effective methods in which to get 
our resources into the hands of our customers. Under 
the guidance and service of a third-party vendor, 
Discipleship Resources is utilizing the most up-to-date 
technology related to warehousing, order entry, order 
picking, packing, shipping, and the handling of 
customer accounts. The relationship with this 
third-party vendor has provided increased customer 
satisfaction, as well as significant savings for DR 

The success of Discipleship Resources during the 
present quadrennium and the decisions of management 
will provide the foundation for product development, 
marketing and distribution for the next quadrennium. 
The organization will continue to be an effective vehicle 
for delivering products to local congregations who look 
to the General Board of Discipleship for help in their 
ministry of making disciples of Jesus Christ 

Response to 1992 General 
Conference Referrals: 

Our Board's emphasis on the primary task of the 
congregation supports the implementation of the 
theme, "Celebrate and Witness: God's Grace-Witness 
for Jesus Christ" (Calendar items 23 & 214). Leader 
training materials and events focus on this theme and 
support its use in congregations and annual 
conferences. The three special programs have been 
supported by our Board in these ways: 



Discipleship 



223 



Campus ministry: Our staff works with the Campus 
Ministry Office of the General Board of Higher 
Education and Ministry to support this program. Efforts 
include Covenants on Campus, a covenant discipleship 
model for college campuses. 

Peace with Justice: The work team on community 
and outreach ministries have developed resources to 
support this program. A specific example of their work 
is found in the new prison ministries packet and in the 
AIDS/HIV resource for Spanish-speaking faith 
communities. In addition, the United Methodist Men's 
Division continues to sponsor an annual World Peace & 
World Order Congressional Conference in Washington, 
DC 

Substance Abuse and Related Violence: Church 
School Publications has produced the Revival of Hope 
curriculum materials, which deal with substance abuse. 

Developing Congregations for Deaf Ministries 
(Calendar item 33) has addressed issues and ministries 
related to deaf, deafened, and hard of hearing persons. 
The staff has supported the use of two videos produced 
by Church School Publications: 'The Gospel of Mark in 
Ainerican Sign Language" and 'That All May 
Understand." Also a brochure entitled, "It's Time to 
Listen," developed by the National Council of Churches 
in Christ Committee on Deaf Ministries has been made 
avjdlable for distribution by annual conferences to all 
churches. 

Church School Publications produced Challenge: 
Christian Perspectives on Social Issues, Vol. 6, Health, 
which addresses concerns related to genetic science 
and health (Calendar item 114). 

Church School Publications developed the study 
document. The Church Studies Homosexuality, in 
response to the Report on the Study of Homosexuality 
(Calendar item 190). This document includes a leader's 
guide and participant's book. 

A Committee on Older Adult Ministries has been 
organized and meets annually (Calendar item 198) . The 
Committee's recommendations are incorporated into 
planning for training support and resource 
development. Also, the Committee recommends a 
process be developed for certifying church workers 
with older adults. 

Christian Home month has been celebrated during 
the month of May (Calendar item 206) . The quadrennial 
theme was "Living as Disciples in our Household." 
Specific emphases for each year were: 1993-Nurturing 
Christian Growth in the Home; 1994-Extending 
Hospitality; 1995-Practicing Stewardship; and 
1996-Growing in Love: Learning to Serve. Two new 
resources were developed by Board staff: Family 
Matters, a congregational planning guide, and Claiming 
Our Time with God and Each Other, a family devotional 
guide. Church School Publications produced three 
resources to support this emphasis: "Parenting," in the 



Lifesearch series; Stones of Promise, a video-based 
resource celebrating the African-American family; 
Invitation Parent Newsletter, to encourage and support 
faith discussions and worship in the home. 

Staff supported prison ministries through 
participation on the Interagency Committee on Prison 
Ministry/Prison Reform and the production of a prison 
ministries study guide packet in 1995 (Calendar item 
208). 

A variety of new resources were developed to 
support the emphasis on Strengthening the Small 
Membership Church (Calendar item 209). Church 
School Publications' New Invitation curriculum 
introduced materials for the One Room Sunday School 
and additional materials for after school programs, 
vacation Bible school, and resources for Korean and 
Spanish speakers in small membership churches. Staff 
of the General Board of Discipleship produced a training 
guide for small membership congregations using 
Foundations: Shaping the Ministry of Christian 
Education in Your Congregation; a videotape. Teaching 
Children in the Small Membership Church; a series of 
reproducible leaflets on Christian education in small 
membership churches; Collaborating in Ministry: 
Letters to Laity and Pastors of Smaller Churches; worship 
and liturgy resources for use in small membership 
churches; and articles related to the needs of small 
membership congregations in Leader in the Church 
School Today, Interpreter, Circuit Rider, and other 
general Church publications. Certification for leaders in 
small membership church education continued to be 
revised and strengthened. The network of these lab 
leaders met for recertification and renewal twice during 
the quadrennium. A specific component for small 
membership congregations was added to Vision 2000. 
The worship staff is giving particular attention to the 
music needs of smaller congregations, especially how to 
discover, train, and utilize volunteer musicians. A staff 
work team relating to pastors of small membership 
churches was formed to gather data on and prepare 
needed resources. In addition. Guidelines for Leading 
Your Church: Administrative Council, 1993-1996 
supports the organizational and ministry structure of 
most small membership churches. Staff conducted 
learning options, workshops, and consultations at 
various events during the quadrennium. 

Resources and materials to support ministry with 
persons and families affected by AIDS/HIV have been 
developed in cooperation with the Interagency Task 
Force on AIDS (Calendar items 221 & 388). This task 
force has recommended that The United Methodist 
Church observe December 1 as World AIDS Day, as 
established by the World Health Organization. The 
General Board of Discipleship voted to support this 
recommendation of the Interagency Task Force. 
Church School Publications addressed the HIV/ Aids 
health issue in Youth!, October, 1992, and "AIDS," in the 
To The Point series. 



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Education on alcohol and substance abuse 
(Calendar item 413) has been addressed by working 
with the United Methodist Publishing House in the 
development of curriculum, Revival of Hope. Materials 
and videotapes are provided for children, youth and 
adults. Leadership training models have been created, 
tested, and implemented across the Church 
connectional system. 

A series of referrals were made to the Board 
concerning The United Methodist Hymnal (Calendar 
item 428). Some wanted additional hymns included; 
some wanted hymns or verses deleted; some objected 
to language usage or changes. The worship staff 
discussed these referrals with staff of the United 
Methodist Publishing House. None of the 
recommended changes were supported-some on the 
basis of the content and some on the basis of the 
technical and legal difficulties in changing the published 
hymnal. 

The development of Black leadership at all levels of 
the Church (Calendar item 433) has been supported by 
our staff work with funding efforts through the Ethnic 
Local Church Concerns Committee. In addition, the 
Ethnic Church Resource and Training project has 
provided consultation and training support for Black 
leadership training. Staff have participated in a number 
of training events in congregations, districts and annual 
conferences in order to address this concern for 
leadership development. 

A special committee supported by the Board and 
the United Methodist Publishing House was 
established to develop a Spanish language hymnal 
(Calendar item 438). The hymnal. Mil Voces Para 
Celebrar, has been produced and is being submitted to 
the 1996 General Conference for approval. 

By Water and the Spirit, a study guide on the Report 
of the Baptism Study Committee, was made available to 
congregations through Church School Publications 
(Calendar item 515) . The Baptism Study Committee has 
been facilitated by the processing of data from this 
church wide study. The Board has provided staff 
support for this work. The final report of the Baptism 
Study Committee was reviewed by the Board in the fall 
of 1995 and has been forwarded to the 1996 General 
Conference for action. 

Staff have supported the Special Days of the Church 
with specific resources for Laity Sunday and Christian 
Education Sunday and through training and 
consultation (Calendar items 549 & 550) . 

Two representatives (one voting member and one 
staff person) from the Board have been full members of 
the Committee on the Native American Comprehensive 
Plan (Calendar item 570). The Committee has 
developed a statement for submission to the 1996 
General Conference. Native American history/culture 
as related to church participation (Calendar item 571) 
was addressed by staff as they served as speakers, 



lecturers and worship leaders. They specifically 
addressed the issue of Native American culture as it 
impacts the church and church participation. 

The National Hispanic Plan (Calendar item 581) has 
been supported by the General Board of Discipleship 
through resource development and training in 
cooperation with the General Boards of Global 
Ministries, Church and Society, and Higher Education 
and Ministry. The Board has hosted a number of 
consultations with the other program agencies and 
Hispanic leaders to design three modules of the 
Training Program for Lay Missioners and 
Pastors/Mentors: the basic instrumental module, basic 
knowledge module, and continuing education module. 
The Board has assumed full responsibility for 
production of Modules I and II in Spanish and English 
language versions. The Board has developed continuing 
education module workshops in the areas of 
evangelism, stewardship, worship, family, youth, 
HIV/AIDS ministry, and spiritual formation. New 
resources have been developed: resources for church 
school extension, a study guide to selected Psalms, lay 
missioners directory and newsletter, youth ministry, 
family ministry, a handbook on spiritual formation, 
faith-sharing guides, evangelism planning handbooks, 
mobilization and interpretation kit for annual 
conferences, money management, worship planning 
handbook, music for faith communities, the 
Spanish-language hymnal, stewardship planning 
handbook, and a resource for assisting non-Hispanic 
congregations for Hispanic ministries. Other resources 
include adaptations of Vision 2000, Foundations for 
Christian Education, a resource on the Methodist class 
meeting and another on civic youth serving agencies. 
Church School Publications developed Aventuras, a new 
bilingual (Spanish and English) resource for children, 
ages three to eleven, with teacher book, full-color 
student books, class pak, and audio cassette with music. 

In collaboration with the National Coordinator and 
the other program agencies, staff participated in the 
training of a core group of national trainers who 
provided leadership for six regional training events in 
1995 and 1996. Staff have also supported Lay Missioner 
training at Perkins School of Theology, the New York 
Conference Hispanic School of Theology, and the 
Southeastern Jurisdiction Hispanic Institute. In 
addition, staff have interpreted the National Plan for 
Hispanic Ministries. Staff have developed an 
agency-wide committee to support the work of the 
National Plan. Staff have hosted a Hispanic writers 
conference in order to support the development of 
additional resources. 

In order to address the Rural Crisis: Special 
Concern (Calendar item 583) , staff sent a representative 
to the Rural Crisis and Violence meeting in Phoenix. A 
resource for small membership churches has been 
produced as a result of this meeting. Staff have 
addressed this concern in workshops and in continuing 



Discipleship 



225 



education events for town and country congregational 
leaders. 

One staff person from the stewardship staff and one 
from the evangelism staff have devoted a major portion 
of their time to working with Black congregations and 
developing special training settings to support 
Resourcing Black Churches in Urban Communities 
(Calendar item 584). 

Basic rural worth has been affirmed by staff who 
have led workshops, consultations and continuing 
education events (Calendar item 590) . Collaborating in 
Ministry by Herb Mather and Terrence Hayes also 
addresses this issue. 

Encouraging tent building ministries to help small 
membership churches has been the work of the General 
Board of Higher Education and Ministries. Staff have 
supported their efforts in supporting the concept of 
pastors who work part time (Calendar item 591). 

Rural chaplaincy as a ministry to laity and clergy was 
addressed by staff who have worked with the General 
Board of Global Ministries to address this item 
(Calendar item 632). 

Higher Education training and scholarships 
(Calendar item 699) is a concern of the General Board 
of Higher Education and Ministry. This resolution has 
been distributed to staff of the General Board of 
Discipleship for information and action, when 
appropriate. 

The United Methodist Book of Worship has been 
actively marketed and promoted (Calendar item 842). 
Training events have been held to facilitate the use of 
the book. It has been well received and accepted 
throughout the denomination. 

Vision 2000 has been accepted in over 40 annual 
conferences (Calendar item 869) . Major launch events 
have been held in these conferences. Many developed 
follow-up training events. Some conferences are now 
into their third and fourth years of involvement with 
Vision 2000. 

Making Evangelism the Number One Priority for 
1993-1996 was referred to all of the general agencies 
(Calendar item 870) . As is the case with most references 
that have a broad reference without specific instruction, 
most of the general agencies do not engage in the 
specifics of an evangelism priority. The Board's 
response in the area of evangelism has been detailed 
above. This work, including several new resources, 
indicates the additional emphasis given to evangelism 
during the quadrennium. 

The Upper Room held a Consultation on Spiritual 
Direction in The United Methodist Church in February 
1995 (Calendar item 871) . Its purpose was to explore the 
role of spiritual direction in the Church today and to 
begin offering support to those within The United 
Methodist Church who are called to the ministry of 



spiritual guidance. The consultation, which consisted of 
a dialogue among twenty invited leaders, was followed 
by a Conference on Spiritual Guidance in the Church in 
November 1995. The conference, which was open to all, 
focused on the United Methodist heritage of spiritual 
guidance, the art of one-on-one direction and spiritual 
guidance in the congregation. 

Staff have worked to enlist and involve youth in the 
life of the church (Calendar item 874). This item has 
been addressed by workshops and plenary sessions at 
Forum (youth leader training events in 1994 and 1996), 
at Youth 95 (an international gathering for youth held in 
1995) and in varieties of workshops at the 
congregational, district, annual conference, and 
jurisdictional levels. This concern is addressed in new 
resources, Reality Check, Just the Facts: A Handbook for 
United Methodist Youth Ministries, and in curriculum 
resources. 

The Upper Room is launching a new devotional 
magazine for youth with the May/June 1996 issue 
(Calendar item 877). Aimed at readers 13-18, it is 
designed to help youth grow in faith and explore the 
relevancy of the Christian faith for the issues they face 
in their daily lives. The magazine, both youth-and 
adult-written, contains daily but undated devotions 
along with other features. 

A Native American School of Evangelism was held 
in 1994 with about 600 persons in attendance (Calendar 
item 879). 

Research projects, training, and resourcing for 
Black Family Ministry Consultants who have been 
identified and trained through the Black Family 
Ministries Project all address the need for resource 
development to assist churches in developing programs 
of mentoring to strengthen African American family life 
(Calendar item 890) . Staff have provided consultation 
services. Print resources are being developed. 

The Board's Committee on Ethnic Local Church 
Concerns has supported the continuation of GCOM 
Ethnic Local Church Concerns (Calendar item 970). 
This Committee has continued its processes of funding 
and evaluation cycles. 

Christian education staff support Mission and 
Aging of the Global Population (Calendar item 992). A 
series of articles on global aging were written and 
distributed to local congregations in 1996. 

The Joint Committee on Congregational 
Development (General Board of Discipleship and the 
General Board of Global Ministries) provide training 
and orientation to pastors of new congregations and 
training for conference leaders in new congregational 
development. Many annual conferences have developed 
a set of strategies for new congregational development. 
The two Boards continue to provide resources and 
direction. Strategies and primary funding for the 



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building of new churches essentially reside in the 
annual conferences (Calendar item 994). 

The Ethnic Church Resource and Training program 
has provided Resources and Pastoral Support to 
Cultivate Black Church Growth (Calendar item 1107). 
Staff provide consultation teams who listen to the 
concerns of participants. Specific training follows as 
tactical teams respond with workshops and 
consultations. 

Continue to Support and Strengthen Ethnic 
Minority Local Churches in the 1992-1996 quadrennium 
(Calendar item 1115) has been accomplished through 
the Ethnic Local Church Concerns funding cycle 
process and through the Ethnic Church Resource and 
Training program. Staff have provided varieties of 
workshops, consultations, and referral services for 
ethnic churches across the denomination. 

Evaluation of the General Agencies Effectiveness in 
Strengthening Black Churches from 1972-1993 has 
been supported by staff participation on the GCOM 
committee (Calendar items 1116 & 1413). The 
committee will report to the General Conference. 

Resources for congregational study of Native 
American Culture and Traditions have been developed 
(Calendar item 1411). Voices: Native American Hymns 
and Worship, Vie Good Mind, and Flight of the Eagles 
have been produced by Church School Publications. 
These resources have been recommended and 
supported by General Board of Discipleship staff. 

Care Giving Teams for AIDS victims and families in 
churches (Calendar item 1527) has been addressed by 
the creation of a data bank which has supplied data to 
leaders in congregations. Videotapes that depict the 
diversity of people with AIDS are promoted. Resources 
are provided for those inquiring about information and 
education about HIV/AIDS. 

The impacts of environmental racism (Calendar 
item 1528) are recognized by the Board's staff. When 
pertinent, staff provide information and consultation 
related to appropriate action by congregations, districts, 
or annual conference. 

Literacy, the Right to Learn: A Basic Human Right 
(Calendar item 1538) has been addressed by the 
development of a file of resources on literacy and ways 
churches can start literacy programs. Materials are 
supplied to those requesting them. This issue is 
addressed in workshops and speeches dealing with 
justice issues needing to be addressed by the church. 

The concern related to accessibility of handicapped 
persons to parsonages and churches has been written 
into the Guidelines for Leading Your Church: Trustees 
(Calendar item 1549) . This is the resource prepared at 
the beginning of each quadrennium for persons serving 
as local church trustees. 



The Church's Response to Changing Rural Issues 
(Calendar item 1554) has been addressed by leadership 
in workshops and training events for leaders in small 
membership churches. A national convocation on this 
issue is being considered. 

Membership in Clubs or Organizations Practicing 
Exclusiveness (Calendar item 1561) has been 
addressed by providing a study guide, "When Hate 
Groups Come to Town," as requested. This issue is 
addressed in presentations and workshops dealing with 
justice issues and the church. 

The concern related to local church annual 
accessibility audit has been written into the Guidelines 
for Leading Your Church: Trustees (Calendar item; 
1731). 

Call to Bishops to Undergird Cooperative Parish 
Ministries (Calendar item 1732) has been addressed by 
the officers of the Small Membership Church Task 
Force meeting with a committee of the Council of 
Bishops. This issue formed a great deal of the 
fi-amework of that conversation with the Bishops. 

Recruitment and Development of a Plan for local 
Black pastors has been addressed by staff as they 
support the work of the General Board of Higher 
Education and Ministry in their efforts to recruit and 
provide resources for Black pastors (Calendar item 
1855). 

Conclusion 

The General Board of Discipleship has responded 
to God's call for service. Thf Hoard has responded to 
the directives of the General Conference. The Board has 
communicated the redemptive love of Jesus Christ. 
Under the guidance of the Holy Spirit, the Board 
pledges that it will continue in this discipleship and 
service. 

The Board believes that the spirit and power of God 
is resident in United Methodist members and 
congregations. This power must be released, 
transformed and transmitted. Through the remainder of 
this decade, it is the intention of the Board to thoroughly 
explore and respond to the potential for transforming 
leadership and congregational ministries. It is the 
sincere hope of the Board that this decade will see 
throughout The United Methodist Church a major 
outpouring of interest in and energy for a ministry that, 
on the one hand, will transform the Church itself and, 
on the other hand, will transform the world which it 



David J. Lawson, President 

Ezra Earl Jones, General Secretary 



Discipleship 



227 



By Water and the Spirit: 
A United Methodist Understanding of Baptism 

A Report of the Baptism Study Committee 



Petition Number: 21464-DI-NonDis-O; GBOD 

Contemporary United Methodism is attempting to 
recover and revitalize its understanding of baptism. To 
do this, we must look to our heritage as Methodists and 
Evangelical United Brethren and, indeed, to the 
foundations of Christian tradition. Throughout our 
history, baptism has been viewed in diverse and even 
contradictory ways. An enriched understanding of 
baptism, restoring the Wesleyan blend of sacramental 
and evangelical aspects, will enable United Methodists 
to participate in the sacrament with renewed 
appreciation for this gift of God's grace. 

Within the Methodist tradition, baptism has long 
been a subject of much concern, even controversy. John 
Wesley retained the sacramental theology which he 
received from his Anglican heritage. He taught that in 
baptism a child was cleansed of the guilt of original sin, 
initiated into the covenant with God, admitted into the 
church, made an heir of the divine kingdom, and 
spiritually born anew. He said that while baptism was 
neither essential to nor sufficient for salvation, it was the 
"ordinary means" that God designated for applying the 
benefits of the work of Christ in human lives. 

On the other hand, although he affirmed the 
regenerating grace of infant baptism, he also insisted 
upon the necessity of adult conversion for those who 
have fallen from grace. A person who matures into moral 
accountability must respond to God's grace in 
repentance and faith. Without personal decision and 
commitment to Christ, the baptismal gift is rendered 
ineffective. 

Baptism for Wesley, therefore, was a part of the 
lifelong process of salvation. He saw spiritual rebirth as 
a twofold experience in the normal process of Christian 
development — to be received through baptism in 
infancy and through commitment to Christ later in life. 
Salvation included both God's initiating activity of grace 
and a willing human response. 

In its development in the United States, Methodism 
was unable to maintain this Wesleyan balance of 
sacramental and evangelical emphases. Access to the 
sacraments was limited during the late eighteenth and 
early nineteenth centuries when the Methodist 
movement was largely under the leadership of 
laypersons who were not authorized to administer them. 
On the American frontier where human ability and 
action were stressed, the revivalistic call for individual 
decision-making, though important, was subject to 



exaggeration. The sacramental teachings of Wesley 
tended to be ignored. In this setting, while infant 
baptism continued not only to be practiced, but also to 
be vigorously defended, its significance became 
weakened and ambiguous. 

Later toward the end of the nineteenth century, the 
theological views of much of Methodism were 
influenced by a new set of ideas which had become 
dominant in American culture. These ideas included 
optimism about the progressive improvement of 
humankind and confidence in the social benefits of 
scientific discovery, technology, and education. 
Assumptions of original sin gave way before the 
assertion that human nature was essentially unspoiled. 
In this intellectual milieu, the old evangelical insistence 
upon conversion and spiritual rebirth seemed quaint 
and unnecessary. 

Thus the creative Wesleyan synthesis of 
sacramentalism and evangelicalism was torn asunder 
and both its elements devalued. As a result, infant 
baptism was variously interpreted and often reduced to 
a ceremony of dedication. Adult baptism was sometimes 
interpreted as a profession of faith and public 
acknowledgment of God's grace, but was more often 
viewed simply as an act of joining the church. By the 
middle of the twentieth century, Methodism in general 
had ceased to understand baptism as authentically 
sacramental. Rather than an act of divine grace, it was 
seen as an expression of human choice. 

Baptism was also a subject of concern and 
controversy in the Evangelical and United Brethren 
traditions that were brought together in 1946 in The 
Evangelical United Brethren Church. Their early 
pietistic revivalism, based upon belief in the availability 
of divine grace and the freedom of human choice, 
emphasized bringing people to salvation through 
Christian experience. In the late nineteenth and early 
twentieth centuries, both Evangelical and United 
Brethren theologians stressed the importance of 
baptism as integral to the proclamation of the gospel, as 
a rite initiating persons into the covenant community 
(paralleling circumcision) , and as a sign of the new birth, 
that gracious divine act by which persons are redeemed 
from sin and reconciled to God. The former Evangelical 
Church consistentiy favored the baptism of infants. The 
United Brethren provided for the baptism of both infants 
and adults. Following the union of 1946, The Evangelical 
United Brethren Church adopted a ritual that included 
services of baptism for infants and adults, and also a 
newly created service for the dedication of infants that 



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had little precedent in official rituals of either of the 
former churches. 

The 1960-64 revision of The Methodist Hymnal, 
including rituals, gave denominational leaders an 
opportunity to begin to recover the sacramental nature 
of baptism in contemporary Methodism. The General 
Commission on Worship sounded this note quite 
explicitly in its introduction to the new ritual in 1964: 

In revising the Order for the Administration of 
Baptism, the Commission on Worship has endeavored to 
keep in mind that baptism is a sacrament, and to restore 
it to the Evangelical-Methodist concept set forth in our 
Articles of Religion.. ..Due recognition was taken of the 
critical reexamination of the theology of the Sacrament of 
Baptism which is currently taking place in ecumenical 
circles, and of its theological content and implications. 

The commission provided a brief historical 
perspective demonstrating that the understanding of 
baptism as a sacrament had been weakened, if not 
discarded altogether, over the years. Many in the 
Church regarded baptism, both of infants and adults, as 
a dedication rather than as a sacrament. The 
commission pointed out that in a dedication we make a 
gift of a life to God for God to accept, while in a sacrament 
God offers the gift of God's unfailing grace for us to 
accept. The 1964 revision of the ritual of the sacrament 
of baptism began to restore the rite to its original and 
historic meaning as a sacrament. 

In the 1989 The United Methodist Hymnal, the 
Services of the Baptismal Covenant I, II and IV (taken 
from the 1984 official ritual of the denomination as 
printed in The Book of Services) continue this effort to 
reemphasize the historic significance of baptism. These 
rituals, in accenting the reality of sin and of 
regeneration, the initiating of divine grace and the 
necessity of repentance and faith, are consistent with the 
Wesleyan combination of sacramentalism and 
evangelicalism. 

United Methodism is not alone in the need to 
recover the significance of baptism nor in its work to do 
so. Other Christian communions are also reclaiming the 
importance of this sacrament for Christian faith and life. 
To reach the core of the meaning and practice of 
baptism, all have found themselves led back through the 
life of the church to the Apostolic Age. An ecumenical 
convergence has emerged from this effort, as can be 
seen in the widely acclaimed document. Baptism, 
Eucharist, and Ministry (1982) . 

Established by the General Conference of 1988 and 
authorized to continue its work by the General 
Conference of 1992, the Committee to Study Baptism is 
participating in this process by offering a theological and 
functional understanding of baptism as embodied in the 
ritual of The United Methodist Church. In so doing, the 
broad spectrum of resources of Scripture, Christian 
tradition, and the Methodist-Evangelical United 



Brethren experience has been taken into account. The 
growing ecumenical consensus has assisted us in our 
thinking. 

We Are Saved by God's Grace 

The Human Condition. As told in the first chapters 
of Genesis, in creation God made human beings in the 
image of God — a relationship of intimacy, dependence, 
and trust. We are open to the indwelling presence of God 
and given freedom to work with God to accomplish the 
divine will and purpose for all of creation and history. To 
be human as God intended is to have loving fellowship 
with God and to reflect the divine nature in our lives as 
fully as possible. 

Tragically, as Genesis 3 recounts, we are unfaithful 
to that relationship. The result is a thorough distortion 
of the image of God in us and the degrading of the whole 
of creation. Through prideful overreach or denial of our 
God-given responsibilities, we exalt our own will, invent 
our own values, and rebel against God. Our very being 
is dominated by an inherent inclination toward evU 
which has traditionally been called original sin. It is a 
universal human condition and affects all aspects of life. 
Because of our condition of sin, we are separated fi^om 
God, alienated from one another, hostile to the natural 
world, and even at odds with our own best selves. Sin 
may be expressed as errant priorities, as deliberate 
wrongdoing, as apathy in the face of need, as 
cooperation with oppression and injustice. Evil is cosmic 
as well as personal; it afflicts both individuals and the 
institutions of our human society. The nature of sin is 
represented in Baptismal Covenants I, II and IV in The 
United Methodist Hymnal by the phrases "the spiritual 
forces of wickedness" and "the evil powers of this 
world," as well as "your sin." Before God all persons are 
lost, helpless to save themselves, and in need of divine 
mercy and forgiveness. 

The Divine Initiative of Grace. While we have 
turned from God, God has not abandoned us. Instead, 
God graciously and continuously seeks to restore us to 
that loving relationship for which we were created, to 
make us into the persons that God would have us be. To 
this end God acts preveniently, that is, before we are 
aware of it, reaching out to save humankind. The Old 
Testament records the story of God's acts in the history 
of the covenant community of Israel to work out the 
divine will and purpose. In the New Testament story, we 
learn that God came into this sinful world in the person 
of Jesus Christ to reveal all that the human mind can 
comprehend about who God is and who God would have 
us be. Through Christ's death and resurrection, the 
power of sin and death was overcome and we are set free 
to again be God's own people (1 Peter 2:9) . Since God is 
the only initiator and source of grace, all grace is 
prevenient in that it precedes and enables any 
movement that we can make toward God. Grace brings 
us to an awareness of our sinful predicament and of our 



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inability to save ourselves; grace motivates us to 
repentance and gives us the capacity to respond to 
divine love. In the words of the baptismal ritual: "All this 
is God's gift, offered to us without price" {The United 
Methodist Hymnal, page 33) . 

The Necessity of Faith for Salvation. Faith is both a 
gift of God and a human response to God. It is the ability 
and willingness to say "yes" to the divine offer of 
salvation. Faith is our awareness of our utter 
dependence upon God, the surrender of our selfish 
wills, the trusting reliance upon divine mercy. The 
candidate for baptism answers "I do" to the question "Do 
you confess Jesus Christ as your Savior, put your whole 
trust in his grace, and promise to serve him as your 
Lord...?" (The United Methodist Hymnal, page 34). Our 
personal response of faith requires conversion in which 
we turn away from sin and turn instead to God. It entails 
a decision to commit our lives to the Lxjrdship of Christ, 
an acceptance of the forgiveness of our sins, the death 
of our old selves, an entering into a new life of the 
Spirit — being bom again Qohn 3:3-5, 2 Corinthians 
5: 17) . All persons do not experience this spiritual rebirth 
in the same way. For some, there is a singular, radical 
moment of conversion. For others, conversion may be 
experienced as the dawning and growing realization 
that one has been constantly loved by God and has a 
personal reliance upon Christ. John Wesley described 
his own experience by saying, "I felt my heart strangely 
warmed. I felt I did trust in Christ, Christ alone for 
salvation; and an assurance was given me that he had 
taken away my sins, even mine, and saved me from the 
law of sin and death." 

The Means by Which God's Grace 
Comes to Us 

Divine grace is made available and effective in 
human lives through a variety of means or "channels," 
as Wesley called them. While God is radically free to 
work in many ways, the church has been given by God 
the special responsibility and privilege of being the Body 
of Christ which carries forth God's purpose of 
redeeming the world. Wesley recognized the church 
itself as a means of grace — a grace-filled and 
grace-sharing community of faithful people. United 
Methodism shares with other Protestant communions 
the understanding that the proclamation of the Word 
through preaching, teaching, and the life of the church 
is a primary means of God's grace. The origin and rapid 
growth of Methodism as a revival movement occurred 
largely through the medium of the proclaimed Gospel. 
John Wesley also emphasized the importance of prayer, 
fasting, Bible study, and meetings of persons for support 
and sharing. 

Because God has created and is creating all that is, 
physical objects of creation can become the bearers of 
divine presence, power, and meaning, and thus become 
sacramental means of God's grace. Sacraments are 



effective means of God's presence mediated through the 
created world. God becoming incarnate in Jesus Christ 
is the supreme instance of this kind of divine action. 
Wesley viewed the sacraments as crucial means of grace 
and affirmed the Anglican teaching that "a sacrament is 
an outward sign of inward grace, and a means whereby 
we receive the same.'" Combining words, actions, and 
physical elements, sacraments are sign-acts which both 
express and convey God's grace and love. Baptism and 
the Lord's Supper are sacraments that were instituted 
or commanded by Christ in the Gospels. 

United Methodists believe that these sign-acts are 
special means of grace. The ritual action of a sacrament 
does not merely point to God's presence in the world, 
but also participates in it and becomes a vehicle for 
conveying that reality. God's presence in the sacraments 
is real, but it must be accepted by human faith if it is to 
transform human lives. The sacraments do not convey 
grace either magically or irrevocably, but they are 
powerful channels through which God has chosen to 
make grace available to us. Wesley identified baptism as 
the initiatory sacrament by which we enter into the 
covenant with God and are admitted as members of 
Christ's church. He understood the Lord's Supper as 
nourishing and empowering the lives of Christians and 
strongly advocated frequent participation in it. The 
Wesleyan tradition has continued to practice and 
cherish the various means through which divine grace 
is made present to us. 

Baptism and the Life of Faith 

The New Testament records that Jesus was 
baptized by John (Matthew 3:13-17), and he 
commanded his disciples to baptize and teach in the 
name of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit (Matthew 
28:19). Baptism is grounded in the life, death, and 
resurrection of Jesus Christ; the grace which baptism 
makes available is that of the atonement of Christ which 
makes possible our reconciliation with God. Baptism 
involves dying to sin, newness of life, union with Christ, 
receiving the Holy Spirit, and incorporation into Christ's 
church. United Methodists affirm this understanding in 
their official documents of faith. Article XVII of the 
Articles of Religion (Methodist) calls baptism "a sign of 
regeneration or the new birth"; the Confession of Faith 
(EUB) states that baptism is "a representation of the 
new birth in Christ Jesus and a mark of Christian 
discipleship." 

77je Baptismal Covenant. In both the Old and New 
Testament, God enters into covenant relationship with 
God's people. A covenant involves promises and 
responsibilities of both parties; it is instituted through a 
special ceremony and expressed by a distinguishing 
sign. By covenant God constituted a servant community 
of the people of Israel, promising to be their God and 
giving them the Law to make clear how they were to live. 
The circumcision of male infants is the sign of this 



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covenant (Genesis 17:1-14, Exodus 24:1-12). In the 
death and resurrection of Jesus Christ, God fulfilled the 
prophecy of a new covenant and called forth the church 
as a servant community Qeremiah 31:31-34, 1 
Corinthians 11:23-26) . The baptism of infants and adults, 
both male and female, is the sign of this covenant. 

Therefore, United Methodists identify our ritual for 
baptism as 'The Services of the Baptismal Covenant" 
(The United Methodist Hymnal, pages 32-54). In baptism 
the Church declares that it is bound in covenant to God; 
through baptism new persons are initiated into that 
covenant The covenant connects God, the community 
of faith, and the person being baptized; all three are 
essential to the fulfillment of the baptismal covenant. 
The faithful grace of God initiates the covenant 
relationship and enables the community and the person 
to respond with faith. 

Baptism by Water and the Holy Spirit. Through the 
work of the Holy Spirit — the continuing presence of 
Christ on earth — the church is instituted to be the 
community of the new covenant. Within this 
community, baptism is by water and the Spirit Gohn 3:5, 
Acts 2:38) . In God's work of salvation, the mystery of 
Christ's death and resurrection is inseparably linked 
with the gift of the Holy Spirit given on the day of 
Pentecost (Acts 2). Likewise, participation in Christ's 
death and resurrection is inseparably linked with 
receiving the Spirit (Romans 6:1-11, 8:9-14). The Holy 
Spirit who is the power of creation (Genesis 1:2) is also 
the giver of new life. Working in the lives of people 
before, during, and after their baptisms, the Spirit is the 
effective agent of salvation. God bestows upon baptized 
persons the presence of the Holy Spirit, marks them 
with an identifying seal as God's own, and implants in 
their hearts the first installment of their inheritance as 
sons and daughters of God (2 Corinthians 1:21-22). It is 
through the Spirit that the life of faith is nourished until 
the final deliverance when they will enter into the 
fullness of salvation (Ephesians 1:13-14). 

Since the Apostolic Age, baptism by water and 
baptism of the Holy Spirit have been connected (Acts 
9:17). Christians are baptized with both, sometimes by 
different sign-actions. Water is administered in the 
name of the triune God (specified in the ritual as Father, 
Son, and Holy Spirit) by an authorized person, and the 
Holy Spirit is invoked with the laying on of hands in the 
presence of the congregation. Water provides the 
central symbolism for baptism. The richness of its 
meaning for the Christian community is suggested in 
the baptismal liturgy which speaks of the waters of 
creation and the flood, the liberation of God's people by 
passage through the sea, the gift of water in the 
wilderness, and the passage through the Jordan River 
to the promised land. In baptism we identify ourselves 
with this people of God and join the community's 
journey toward God. The use of water in baptism also 
symbolizes cleansing from sin, death to old life, and 
rising to begin new life in Christ. In United Methodist 



tradition, the water of baptism may be administered by 
sprinkling, pouring, or immersion. However it is 
administered, water should be utilized with enough 
generosity to enhance our appreciation of its symbolic 
meanings. 

The baptismal liturgy includes the biblical symbol 
of the anointing with the Holy Spirit — the laying on of 
hands with the optional use of oil. This anointing 
promises to the baptized person the power to live 
faithfully the kind of life that water baptism signifies. In 
the early centuries of the church, the laying on of hands 
usually followed immediately upon administration of the 
water and completed the ritual of membership. 
Because the laying on of hands was, in the Western 
Church, an act to be performed only by a bishop, it was 
later separated from water baptism and came to be 
called confirmation. (See page 233.) In confirmation the 
Holy Spirit marked the baptized person as God's own 
and strengthened him or her for discipleship. In the 
worship life of the early church, the water and the 
anointing led directly to the celebration of the Lord's 
Supper as part of the service of initiation, regardless of 
the age of the baptized. The current rituals of the 
Baptismal Covenant rejoin these three elements into a 
unified service. Together these symbols point to, 
anticipate, and offer participation in the life of the 
community of faith as it embodies God's presence in the 
world. 

Baptism as Incorporation into the Body of Christ. 
Christ constitutes the church as his Body by the power 
of the Holy Spirit (1 Corinthians 12:13, 27) . The church 
draws new persons into itself as it seeks to remain 
faithful to its commission to proclaim and exemplify the 
Gospel. Baptism is the sacrament of initiation and 
incorporation into the Body of Christ. An infant, child, 
or adult who is baptized becomes a member of the 
catholic (universal) church, of the denomination, and of 
the local congregation. (See page 233.) Therefore, 
baptism is a rite of the whole church, which ordinarily 
requires the participation of the gathered, worshiping 
congregation. In a series of promises within the liturgy 
of baptism, the community affirms its own faith and 
pledges to act as spiritual mentor and support for the 
one who is baptized. Baptism is not merely an 
individualistic, private, or domestic occasion. When 
unusual but legitimate circumstances prevent a baptism 
from taking place in the midst of the gathered 
community during its regular worship, every effort 
should be made to assemble representatives of the 
congregation to participate in the celebration. Later, the 
baptism should be recognized in the public assembly of 
worship in order that the congregation may make its 
appropriate affirmations of commitment and 
responsibility. 

Baptism brings us into union with Christ, with each 
other, and with the church in every time and place. 
Through this sign and seal of our common discipleship, 
our equality in Christ is made manifest (Galatians 



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231 



3:27-28) . We affirm that there is one baptism into Christ, 
celebrated as our basic bond of unity in the many 
communions that make up the Body of Christ 
(Ephesians 4:4-6) . The power of the Spirit in baptism 
does not depend upon the mode by which water is 
administered, the age or psychological disposition of the 
baptized person, or the character of the minister. It is 
God's grace that makes the sacrament whole. One 
baptism calls the various churches to overcome their 
divisions and visibly manifest their unity. Our oneness 
in Christ calls for mutual recognition of baptism in these 
communions as a means of expressing the unity that 
Christ intends (1 Corinthians 12:12-13). 

Baptism as Forgiveness of Sin. In baptism God offers 
and we accept the forgiveness of our sin (Acts 2:38). 
With the pardoning of sin which has separated us from 
God, we are justified-freed from the guilt and penalty of 
sin and restored to right relationship with God. This 
reconciliation is made possible through the atonement 
of Christ and made real in our lives by the work of the 
Holy Spirit. We respond by confessing and repenting of 
our sin, and affirming our faith that Jesus Christ has 
accomplished all that is necessary for our salvation. 
Faith is the necessary condition for justification; in 
baptism, that faith is professed. God's forgiveness 
makes possible the renewal of our spiritual lives and our 
becoming new beings in Christ. 

Baptism as New Life. Baptism is the sacramental 
sign of new life through and in Christ by the power of 
the Holy Spirit. Variously identified as regeneration, 
new birth, and being born again, this work of grace 
makes us into new spiritual creatures (2 Corinthians 
5:17). We die to our old nature which was dominated by 
sin and enter into the very life of Christ who transforms 
us. Baptism is the means of entry into new life in Christ 
Gohn 3:5; Titus 3:5), but new birth may not always 
coincide with the moment of the administration of water 
or the lajdng on of hands. Our awareness and 
acceptance of our redemption by Christ and new life in 
him may vary throughout our lives. But, in whatever way 
the reality of the new birth is experienced, it carries out 
the promises God made to us in our baptism. 

Baptism and Holy Living. New birth into life in 
Christ, which is signified by baptism, is the beginning 
of that process of growth in grace and holiness through 
which God brings us into closer relationship with Jesus 
Christ, and shapes our lives increasingly into conformity 
with the divine will. Sancttfication is a gift of the gracious 
presence of the Holy Spirit, a yielding to the Spirit's 
power, a deepening of our love for God and neighbor. 
Holiness of heart and life, in the Wesleyan tradition, 
always involves both personal and social holiness. 

Baptism is the doorway to the sanctified life. The 
sacrament teaches us to live in the expectation of further 
gifts of God's grace. It initiates us into a community of 
faith that prays for holiness; it calls us to life lived in 
faithfulness to God's gift. Baptized believers and the 
community of faith are obligated to manifest to the world 



the new redeemed humanity which lives in loving 
relationship m\h God and strives to put an end to all 
human estrangements. There are no conditions of 
human life (including age or intellectual ability, race or 
nationality, gender or sexual identity, class or 
handicapping conditions) that exclude persons from the 
sacrament of baptism. We strive for and look forward to 
the reign of God on earth, of which baptism is a sign. 
Baptism is fulfilled only when the believer and the 
church are wholly conformed to the image of Christ. 

Baptism as God's Gift to Persons of Any Age. There 
is one baptism as there is one source of salvation — the 
gracious love of God. The baptizing of a person, whether 
as an infant or an adult, is a sign of God's saving grace. 
That grace — experienced by us as initiating, enabling, 
and empowering — is the same for all persons. All stand 
in need of it and none can be saved without it. The 
difference between the baptism of adults and that of 
infants is that the Christian faith is consciously being 
professed by an adult who is baptized. A baptized infant 
comes to profess her or his faith later in life, after having 
been nurtured and taught by parent(s) or other 
responsible adults and the community of faith. Infant 
baptism is the prevailing practice in situations where 
children are born to believing parents and brought up 
in Christian homes and communities of faith. Adult 
baptism is the norm when the church is in a missionary 
situation, reaching out to persons in a culture which is 
indifferent or hostile to the faith. While the baptism of 
infants is appropriate for Christian families, the 
increasingly minority status of the church in 
contemporary society demands more attention to 
evangelizing, nurturing, and baptizing adult converts. 

Infant baptism has been the historic practice of the 
overwhelming majority of the church throughout the 
Christian centuries. While the New Testament contains 
no explicit mandate, there is ample evidence for the 
baptism of infants in Scripture (Acts 2:38-41, 16:15,33) 
and in early Christian doctrine and practice. Infant 
baptism rests firmly on the understanding that God 
prepares the way of faith before we request or even 
know that we need help (prevenient grace). The 
sacrament is a powerful expression of the reality that all 
persons come before God as no more than helpless 
infants, unable to do anything to save ourselves, 
dependent upon the grace of our loving God. The 
faithful covenant community of the church serves as a 
means of grace for those whose lives are impacted by its 
ministry. Through the church, God claims infants as 
well as adults to be participants in the gracious covenant 
of which baptism is the sign. This understanding of the 
workings of divine grace also applies to persons who for 
reasons of handicapping conditions or other limitations 
are unable to answer for themselves the questions of the 
baptismal ritual. While we may not be able to 
comprehend how God works in their lives, our faith 
teaches us that God's grace is sufficient for their needs 
and, thus, they are appropriate recipients of baptism. 



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The church affirms that children being bom into the 
brokenness of the world should receive the cleansing 
and renevwng forgiveness of God no less than adults. 
The saving grace made available through Christ's 
atonement is the only hope of salvation for persons of 
any age. In baptism infants enter into a new life in Christ 
as children of God and members of the Body of Christ. 
The baptism of an infant incorporates him or her into 
the community of faith and nurture, including 
membership in the local church. 

The baptism of infants is properly understood and 
valued if the child is loved and nurtured by the faithful 
worshiping church and by the child's own family. H a 
parent or sponsor (godparent) cannot orwill not nurture 
the child in the faith, then baptism is to be postponed 
until Christian nurture is available. A child who dies 
without being baptized is received into the love and 
presence of God because the Spirit has worked in that 
child to bestow saving grace. If a child has been baptized 
but her or his family or sponsors do not faithfully nurture 
the child in the faith, the congregation has a particular 
responsibility for incorporating the child into its life. 

Understanding the practice as an authentic 
expression of how God works in our lives. The United 
Methodist Church strongly advocates the baptism of 
infants within the faith community: "Because the 
redeeming love of God, revealed in Jesus Christ, 
extends to all persons and because Jesus explicitly 
included the children in his kingdom, the pastor of each 
charge shall earnestly exhort all Christian parents or 
guardians to present their children to the Lord in 
Baptism at an early age" (1992 Book of Discipline, ^ 221) . 
We affirm that while thanksgiving to God and dedication 
of parents to the task of Christian child-raising are 
aspects of infant baptism, the sacrament is primarily a 
gift of divine grace. Neither parents nor infants are the 
chief actors; baptism is an act of God in and through the 
church. 

We respect the sincerity of parents who choose not 
to have their infants baptized, but we acknowledge that 
these views do not coincide with the Wesleyan 
understanding of the nature of the sacrament. The 
United Methodist Church does not accept either the 
idea that only believer's baptism is valid or the notion 
that the baptism of infants magically imparts salvation 
apart from active personal faith. Pastors are instructed 
by The Book of Discipline to explain our teaching clearly 
on these matters, so that parent(s) or sponsors might be 
free of misunderstandings. 

The United Methodist Book of Worship contains "An 
Order of Thanksgiving for the Birth or Adoption of tiie 
Child" (pages 585-87), which may be recommended in 
situations where baptism is inappropriate, but parents 
wish to take responsibility publicly for the growth of the 
child in faith. It should be made clear that this rite is in 
no way equivalent to or a substitute for baptism. Neither 
is it an act of infant dedication. If the infant has not been 



baptized, the sacrament should be administered as soon 
as possible after the Order of Thanksgiving. 

God's Faithfulness to the Baptismal Covenant. Since 
baptism is primarily an act of God in the church, the 
sacrament is to be received by an individual only once. 
This position is in accord with the historic teaching of 
the church universal, originating as early as the second 
century and having been recentiy reaffirmed 
ecumenically in Baptism, Eucharist and Ministry. 

The claim that baptism is unrepeatable rests on the 
steadfast faithfulness of God. God's initiative establishes 
the covenant of grace into which we are incorporated in 
baptism. By misusing our God-given freedom, we may 
live in neglect or defiance of that covenant, but we 
cannot destroy God's love for us. When we repent and 
return to God, the covenant does not need to be remade, 
because God has always remained faithful to it. What is 
needed is renewal of our commitment and reaffirmation 
of our side of the covenant. 

God's gift of grace in the baptismal covenant does 
not save us apart from our human response of faith. 
Baptized persons may have many significant spiritual 
experiences, which they will desire to celebrate publicly 
in the worship life of the church. Such experiences may 
include defining moments of conversion, repentance of 
sin, gifts of the Spirit, deepening of commitment, 
changes in Christian vocation, important transitions in 
the life of discipleship. These occasions call not for 
repetition of baptism, but for reaffirmations of baptismal 
vows as a witness to the good news that while we may 
be unfaithful, God is not. Appropriate services for such 
events would be "Confirmation or Reaffirmation of 
Faith" (see Baptismal Covenant I in The United 
Methodist Hymnal) or "A Celebration of New 
Beginnings in Faith" {The United Methodist Book of 
Wors/z?/), pages 588-90). 

Nurturing Persons in the Life of Faith. If persons are 
to be enabled to live faithfully the human side of the 
baptismal covenant, Christian nurture is essential. 
Christian nurture builds on baptism and is itself a means 
of grace. For infant baptism, an early step is instruction 
prior to baptism of parent(s) or sponsors in the Gospel 
message, the meaning of the sacrament, and the 
responsibilities of a Christian home. The pastor has 
specific responsibility for this step {The Book of 
Discipline, % 439. l.b.). Adults who are candidates for 
baptism need careful preparation for receiving this gift 
of grace and living out its meaning {The Book of 
Discipline, ^216.1.). 

After baptism, the faithful church provides the 
nurture which makes possible a comprehensive and 
lifelong process of growing in grace. The content of this 
nurturing will be appropriate to the stages of life and 
maturity of faith of individuals. Christian nurture 
includes both cognitive learning and spiritual formation. 
A crucial goal is the bringing of persons to recognition 
of their need for salvation and their acceptance of God's 



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233 



gift in Jesus Christ. Those experiencing conversion and 
commitment to Christ are to profess their faith in a 
public ritual. They will need to be guided and supported 
throughout their lives of discipleship. Through its 
worship life, its Christian education programs, its 
spiritual growth emphases, its social action and mission, 
its examples of Christian discipleship, and its offering of 
the various means of grace, the church strives to shape 
persons into the image of Christ. Such nurturing 
enables Christians to live out the transforming potential 
of the grace of their baptism. 

Profession of Christian Faith and Confirmation. The 
Christian life is a djmamic process of change and 
growth, marked at various points by celebrations in 
rituals of the saving grace of Christ. The Holy Spirit 
works in the lives of persons prior to their baptism, is at 
work in their baptism, and continues to work in their 
lives after their baptism. When persons recognize and 
accept this activity of the Holy Spirit, they respond with 
renewed faith and commitment. 

In the early church, baptism, the laying on of hands, 
and eucharist were a unified rite of initiation and new 
birth for Christians of all ages. During the Middle Ages 
in Western Europe, confirmation was separated from 
baptism in both time and theology. A misunderstanding 
developed of confirmation as completing baptism, with 
emphasis upon human vows and initiation into church 
membership. John Wesley did not recommend 
confirmation to his preachers or to the new Methodist 
church in America. Since 1964 in the former Methodist 
Church, the first public profession of faith for those 
baptized as infants has been called Confirmation. In the 
former Evangelical United Brethren Church, there was 
no such rite until union with The Methodist Church in 
1968. With the restoration of confirmation-as the laying 
on of hands-to the current baptismal ritual, it should be 
emphasized that confirmation is what the Holy Spirit 
does. Confirmation is a divine action, the work of the 
Spirit empowering a person "born through water and 
the Spirit" to "live as a faithful disciple of Jesus Christ." 

An adult or youth preparing for baptism should be 
carefully instructed in its life-transforming significance 
and responsibilities. Such a person professes in the 
sacrament of baptism his or her faith in Jesus Christ and 
commitment to discipleship, is offered the gift of 
assurance, and is confirmed by the power of the Holy 
Spirit (see Baptismal Covenant I, sections 4, 11, and 12). 
No separate ritual of confirmation is needed for the 
believing person. 

An infant who is baptized cannot make a personal 
profession of faith as a part of the sacrament. Therefore, 
as the young person is nurtured and matures so as to be 
able to respond to God's grace, conscious faith and 
intentional commitment are necessary. Such a person 
must come to claim the faith of the church proclaimed 
in baptism as her or his own faith. Deliberate 
preparation for this event focuses on the young person's 



self-understanding and appropriation of Christian 
doctrines, spiritual disciplines, and life of discipleship. 
It is a special time for experiencing divine grace and for 
consciously embracing one's Christian vocation as a 
part of the priesthood of all believers. Youth who were 
not baptized as infants share in the same period of 
preparation for profession of Christian faith. For them, 
it is nurture for baptism, for becoming members of the 
church, and for confirmation. 

When persons who were baptized as infants are 
ready to profess their Christian faith, they participate in 
the service which United Methodism now calls 
Confirmation. This occasion is not an entrance into 
church membership, for this was accomplished through 
baptism. It is the first public affirmation of the grace of 
God in one's baptism and the acknowledgment of one's 
acceptance of that grace by faith. This moment includes 
all the elements of conversion-repentance of sin, 
surrender and death of self, trust in the saving grace of 
God, new life in Christ, and becoming an instrument of 
God's purpose in the world. The profession of Christian 
faith, to be celebrated in the midst of the worshiping 
congregation, should include the voicing of baptismal 
vows as a witness to faith and the opportunity to give 
testimony to personal Christian experience. 

Confirmation follows profession of the Christian 
faith as part of the same service. Confirmation is a 
dynamic action of the Holy Spirit that can be repeated. 
In confirmation the outpouring of the Holy Spirit is 
invoked to provide the one being confirmed with the 
power to live in the faith that he or she has professed. 
The basic meaning of confirmation is strengthening and 
making firm in Christian faith and life. The ritual action 
in confirmation is the laying on of hands as the sign of 
God's continuing gift of the grace of Pentecost. 
Historically, the person being confirmed was also 
anointed on the forehead with oil in the shape of a cross 
as a mark of the Spirit's work. The ritual of the baptismal 
covenant included in The United Methodist Hymnal 
makes clear that the first and primary confirming act of 
the Holy Spirit is in connection with and immediately 
follows baptism. 

When a baptized person has professed her or his 
Christian faith and has been confirmed, that person 
enters more fully into the responsibilities and privileges 
of membership in the church. Just as infants are 
members of their human families, but are unable to 
participate in all aspects of family life, so baptized infants 
are members of the church-the family of faith-but are not 
yet capable of sharing everything involved in 
membership. For this reason, statistics of church 
membership are counts of professed/confirmed 
members rather than of all baptized members. 

Reaffirmation of One's